McKee Memorial, Finglas

At the crossroads in Finglas village stands a stone memorial that was erected to the memory of a man called Richard McKee. He was a member of the Irish Volunteers, a group of men who fought in the Easter Rising and the War of Independence.

This video is designed as a resource for primary and post-primary students up to Junior Certificate.

McKee Memorial

At the crossroads in Finglas village where the village green used to be, stands a stone memorial, which was erected to the memory of a man named Richard McKee.

Richard ‘Dick’ McKee was born in 1893 on the Phibsboro Road. He joined the Irish Volunteers, a group of men who fought the British in the Easter Rising and the War of Independence.

He was captured after the Easter Rising of 1916 and sent to prison in England and Wales. In 1918 he was released and he returned to Ireland to become Commander of the Dublin Brigade of the Irish Volunteers. He trained their soldiers including Liam Mellowes, Conor Clune, Peadar Clancy and Martin Savage after whom some roads in Finglas were named.

In 1920 Dick McKee was betrayed and then captured by the British Army. He was tortured in Dublin Castle, and still showed how brave he was as he would not tell the British soldiers the names of his comrades. He was shot on 21 November 1920 while trying to escape. Dick McKee is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery. McKee Barracks on the North Circular Road is named after him.

The McKee Memorial was unveiled by President Eamon De Valera on 10 June 1951.

Comments

Dick McKee was not born in Finglas. He was born in 1893 on the Phibsborough Rd near the junction with the North Circular Rd. By 1901 the family were living in Drumshanbo, Co Leitrim. They moved to live in Finglas Bridge in 1911 after his father died. Ref: Royal Irish Academy Dictionary of Irish Biography

Many thanks for notifying us of this error. I have corrected the text and will arrange to re-record the audio as soon as possible.

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