crime-thriller

Anthony Horowitz in Conversation with Sinéad Crowley

Anthony HorowitzListen back to bestselling author Anthony Horowitz in conversation with author and RTÉ correspondent Sinéad Crowley, recorded in Dublin City Library & Archive, Pearse St on Thursday 14 September 2017 at 7pm. Hear the wonderfully entertaining Anthony Horowitz​ read from his latest novel 'The Word is Murder' and talk to Sinéad Crowley about what he reads, how he writes and the way he's seeking to change the classic template for murder mysteries.

We love this quote where Anthony remembers when he first discovered libraries and reading as a young boy at boarding school:
"I found a library and I began to read books. And books became to me much more than just a read, they became a lifeline, they became an escape"
 Anthony read from, and talked about his latest novel The Word is Murder, which is the first of a brilliant new detective series set in London featuring Detective Michael Hawthorne.

CWA Dagger Winners for 2016 Announced

CWA logoA little behind on this one, as the winners were announced in London on the 11th October last. But never too late to bring your attention to the books making the news and winning the accolades. Should you be wondering, the CWA (Crime Writers’ Association) Daggers, awarded annually, celebrate the best in crime and thriller writing.

DodgersProbably the standout winner this year is first-time American novelist Bill Beverly who has won the Crime Writers’ Association’s Gold Dagger for the best crime novel of the year as well as the John Creasey New Blood Dagger for the best debut crime novel. One award is good, two is better! Well done him.

The Diamond Dagger, which some might deem the Crime Writers' Association's highest honour, and awarded for "a career's outstanding contribution to crime fiction", was actually announced last January and went to Peter James. James has written 28 novels and sold over 18 million books worldwide, and is best known for his series of crime books featuring Detective Superintendent Roy Grace.

Echoland is Dublin: One City, One Book 2017 Choice!

EcholandWe are delighted to announce that Echoland by Joe Joyce, published by Liberties Press, is the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2017. Echoland is the first novel in the Echoland series by Joe Joyce. Set in Dublin in the 1940s, with the threat of British or German invasion hanging over the country, it features young lieutenant Paul Duggan, who is tasked with investigating a suspected German spy. An addictive thriller about the double-dealing world of spies and politics, it shines a light on an exciting period in Ireland’s history.

The announcement follows a highly successful Dublin: One City One Book Festival in 2016, when the book choice was Fallen by Lia Mills, and the festival became Two Cities One Book, when it twinned with Belfast for the commemorative year.

Crime Fiction Anyone?

Donna LeonCrime fiction books are forever popular, as a look at any weekly bestsellers list will demonstrate. Think 'The Girl on the Train' (which I've just finished reading, and enjoyed), it's been a bestseller for umpteen weeks. Liz Nugent was topping the Irish bestsellers for a number of weeks recently with 'Lying in Wait', while James Patterson's name features regularly on such lists, albeit with books penned by other authors.

Right: Donna Leon in Dubray Bookshop, Dublin, April 2013. (See larger image)

Most of my reads are of crime novels in translation, as I like to travel the world a bit, at least in print. This literary journey recently took me even as far as Argentina and new-to-me author Claudia Pineiro (see below), an author I might not have discovered if it weren't for the International Dublin Literary Award. The inclusion of novels in translation adds greatly to the standing of this Award and differentiates it from most other book awards, and you could do worse than visit the Award site where you will be presented with hundreds of books to choose from, many in translation.

Nails, Axes, Mirrors. And Love! Much ado about Crime

crime titlesIt is all too infrequent these days that I get a chance to post here on the blog regarding my crime fiction reads. It's not to say that I haven't been reading of late, far from it, but it does mean that I can struggle a little to recall the story line details of the many books I have read since my last post and how exactly I felt about them. But let me try at any rate. The following five books are either of an Italian, Thai, French or South African flavour, and I'm glad to say that none of them will disappoint. So read on!

Irish Crime Fiction Award Time!

Unravelling OliverThe Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards shortlists were announced on Thursday (5th Nov) , and one of the categories I'm delighted to say is crime fiction. I wrote back in October 2013  about how Irish Crime Fiction (was) in a Healthy State, and I think it safe to say that hasn't changed.

Right: Last year's winner, Unravelling Oliver by Liz Nugent

This year's shortlist is:-

Henning Mankell Passes, RIP

Henning MankellHenning Mankell, that giant of Swedish, indeed European, crime fiction writing, has sadly passed away at the age of 67. He had been suffering from cancer. Though not exclusively a crime writer, his Kurt Wallander (pronounced vahl lahń’ der) crime series are known the world over and are must-reads for all fans of the crime fiction genre. The Wallander TV series has also proved a big success, viewers in this country may have been lucky enough to view the series on BBC 4.

Crime Reads can be Guilty Pleasures

crime titlesIt's been some time since I've had the chance to share with you my crime reads, so when I do get the chance there is guilty pleasure aplenty. This time round I am focusing on books from the Nordic region, with titles in translation from Swedish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Danish authors. Now this concentration might be no surprise to anyone who follows my posts here on the library blog, as I am an avid reader of crime titles in translation, Nordic writers having a particular appeal for me. But not exclusively, as you will see next time round when I will venture further south to France and Italy and even to Thailand and South Africa!

But back to the present, and I have to start with a BIG favourite of mine, Norway's Karin Fossum, and the 7th title in the Inspector Sejer Series, The Murder of Harriet Krohn 4.5 stars.

Lemaitre's Camille wins the CWA International Dagger

Camille'Camille' by Pierre Lemaitre (translated by Frank Wynne, published by Quercus, March 2015) was last night announced as the winner of the Crime Writers' Association (CWA)  International Dagger. For my part I am delighted with the selection, even though I haven't yet read this, the third in the trilogy starring Commandant Camille Verhoeven (what an admission!). The first two titles I can highly recommend, and if 'Camille' is anything like as good then I have no hesitation in saying that the selection is well justified. Let me quickly add that I presently await the arrival of my library copy; I expect it any day now.

More Crime Reads to Savour

Gone GirlIn recent months I have continued apace with my crime fiction reading, and here I share with you just some of those reads, they being books by Gillian Flynn, Donna Leon, Thomas Enger and Fred Vargas. So read on!

Who at this stage is not familiar to some degree with the story that is 'Gone Girl' 4.5 stars seeing how the film version was such a hit? Gillian Flynn's book, upon which the film is based, has proved a huge success, being the 25th bestselling adult fiction title of all time and spending 8 weeks at the top of the New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list. 'Gone Girl' is the classic tale of a wife going missing and the finger of suspicion regarding her disappearance pointing at her husband. Where is Amy Dunne, and has loving husband Nick got something to do with her disappearance?

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