Blog

Raheny Library Closure, 25 May

Raheny LibraryReferendum Notice. Raheny Library will be closed all day on Friday, 25 May, as the premises will be in use as a polling station. 

The children's library will re-open as normal at 10am on Saturday, 26 May. We hope to have the adult library open again by 12 noon on Saturday, 26 May, or as soon as possible after that.

We regret any inconvenience.<--break-><--break->

Online Renewals<--break->

May Public Holiday Arrangements

Cherry blossomDublin City Public Libraries will be closed from Saturday 5 May to Monday 7 May 2018 (inclusive).   Branch libraries will re-open on Tuesday 8 May 2018.

Access eResources 24/7

Don't forget you can access our collection of eBooks, eAudiobooks, digital magazines, comics, graphic novels and databases over the May public holiday: www.dublincity.ie/library-eresources

Plus explore Dublin's history through our digital repository with its vast collection of old photos, maps and ephemera.

Online Renewals<--break->

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

Le FanuThe official name of the Ballyfermot Dublin City Council park, known to the locals as The Lawns,  is Le Fanu Park and a nearby road also carries the same unique name.  

But who was Le Fanu, and why is his unusual name used in Ballyfermot?

Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu (24 August, 1814 – 7 February, 1873) was a newspaper publisher and writer who is best remembered for his classic ghost stories.  Born at 45 Lower Dominick Street in Dublin, his family were a mix of Huguenot, English and Irish ancestry.  His great-uncle was the playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan. 

Furry Friends at Rathmines Library

My Cat GingerDuring February 2018, Rathmines Library hosted Tarsila Kruse’s exhibition 100 days of Dogs, which features gorgeous illustrations of man's best friend from her new book.  Inspired by Tarsila's exhibition, Rathmines Library decided to hold an art competition, inviting children to draw their own companion animal – whether it was one from a story, an imaginary beast or their own pet.  We were delighted with the results!  The competition entries, which reveal artistic skill, a love for animals, and a sense of fun, went on display in Rathmines Library during March.

Many thanks to all the children who submitted pictures and congratulations to the winners:

Tweet Day 2018 in Dublin City Public Libraries & Archive

Books inOn 10 April 2018 we joined colleagues around the country to highlight the diverse range of services provided by City and County Councils using the hashtags #ourcouncilday and #ÁrLáSaChomhairle on Twitter.

From organising and hosting exhibitions and events like toddler groups, author readings, film clubs; to creating book displays, processing books, magazines & DVDs, facilitating online courses, welcoming school visits, creating podcasts and assisting with research queries libraries are busy places. Scroll down to take a look at a typical day at Dublin City Public Libraries and Archives!  (P.S. Here's a link if you'd like to know more about joining your library!)

Women’s Voices 1914-1918

Nora Guilfoyle2018 marks the 100th anniversary of World War 1 Armistice. From working in munitions factories, V.A.D. nursing, supporting the war effort through charitable works, and leading the anti-conscription movement, World War 1 led to a multitude of different experiences for Irish women. Here we read from some archival sources from Dublin City Library and Archive to highlight four Irish women whose lives were impacted by the First World War in very different ways.

The four women featured are Anna Haslam, Nora Guilfoyle (pictured right), Monica Roberts and Maeve Cavanagh.

The Conscription Crisis

Conscription CrisisThe Conscription Crisis – After Russia’s withdrawal from the First World War, Germany started an offensive on the western front in March 1918. The British Government subsequently introduced the Military Services Act in April 1918, extending conscription to every Irish male between the ages of 18 and 50. Most strands of Irish life vigorously opposed conscription, leading to a retreat from the British authorities some months later.

Na Fianna article by Countess Markieviecz – January 1916 Digital.libraries.dublincity.ie

Clear it Out!

bagsWhen you open your wardrobe do you risk life and limb from the ensuing avalanche of clothing that you have kept since your first communion? Are you afraid to look in your attic lest you discover, behind the heaving boxes of ancient Christmas decorations, the earthly remains of Shergar? Would your shoe collection make Imelda Marcos weep tears of sheer joy? Do your kitchen cupboards make you speculate, like Disney’s Ariel, as to ‘How many wonders can one cavern hold?’

If so then help is at hand! For the month of April Rathmines library will be hosting a display of books on de-cluttering your home to help you get rid of all the junk and unwanted bits and bobs that you may have accumulated over the years so you can create more space and enjoy a more organised, harmonious environment.

Suffrage Stalwarts: Anna and Thomas Haslam

Haslam benchStrolling around the centre of St. Stephens Green, amongst the flowers, swans, tourists and lunchtime-time sandwich eaters, stands an unassuming seat which you might easily pass-by without noticing. Going in for a closer look, the curious onlooker will note that this bench is dedicated to one Anna and Thomas Haslam for their tireless work campaigning for equal rights for women.

 

Two Irish Novelists Make the International Dublin Literary Award Shortlist

Literary Award 2018Two novels by Irish authors and six novels in translation are among the 10 shortlisted for the 2018 International DUBLIN Literary Award.  The two novels by Irish authors are The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride and Solar Bones by Mike McCormack; the six novels in translation hail from France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Mexico and South Korea, while the remaining two come  from South Africa and the USA.

The International DUBLIN Literary Award is worth €100,000 to the winner. If the book has been translated the author receives €75,000 and the translator received €25,000. The award, sponsored by Dublin City Council and managed by the City Library Service. was launched on 7th April 1995 and is now in its 23rd year.

Feedback