Latest from our Blog

New Opportunity for Theatre Archivist

ITA/131/04/38aDublin City Council invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the position of Theatre Archivist (1-year contract) to work cataloguing collections which are part of the Irish Theatre Archive (ITA).

Photo: Michael Mac Liammoir with Jimmy O’Dea, Milo O’Shea watching. Irish Theatre Archive: Jimmy O’Dea Collection: ITA/131/04/38a

Irish author Kit de Waal on Women's Prize Longlist

The Trick to TimeThe 2018 Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist was announced on International Women's Day, 8 March. We were delighted to see Kit de Waal's second novel The Trick to Time featured on the 16 strong longlist. Her debut novel, the excellent My Name is Leon proved popular amongst readers and The Trick to Time is definitely one on our must read shelf! Set in Birmingham in the 1970s, a young Irish couple, Mona and William meet, fall in love and marry but tragedy soon forces them apart. Years later Mona pieces together her memories of this time in an effort to come to terms with her grief.

The longlist also features one of last year's most talked about novels, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine and the highly (and long) anticipated second novel from Arundhati Roy, author of much-loved God of Small Things.  Six debut novelists sit alongside established names such as Pulitzer Prize winning author Jennfier Egan, who won many fans for her 2010 novel A Visit from the Goon Squad. Nicola Barker's H(a)ppy has already been award the Goldsmith's Prize 2017 and will surely be in the running.

News from Nelson: Ropery

RopeMarch is always a difficult month for me, as the eighth is the anniversary of when I was blown off my Pillar.  Believe it or not, I’ve had a major headache ever since! So I prefer to dwell on happier times and now I’m thinking instead of when I was first placed on the Pillar.  It was my first view of Dublin, my new home, and when I swivelled my good eye around, I noted with satisfaction that I was looking over the River Liffey and the gorgeous new Custom House, designed by James Gandon (an incomer like myself) and completed in 1791. 

Although the economic boom of Georgian Dublin had vanished with the 1801 Act of Union, as you can see from the attached illustration, the port was still busy with  ships of all descriptions.  A fine place for an old salt like myself to settle down.<--break->

New opportunity for Musician in Residence

GuitarDublin City Public Libraries invites applications for Musician(s) in Residence from individuals or groups.  The residency is envisaged as part-time, to engage with different age groups to compose, produce and perform music at the Central Library’s Music Service, other Dublin City Public Libraries and in other Dublin City Council venues as required. The groups will be identified and selected by Dublin City Public Libraries.

Applicants should submit an expression of interest to include the following:

Witnesses to War

Suite FrancaiseAs 2018 marks the centenary of the end of the First World War, Rathmines Library will host a book display called Witnesses to War throughout the month of March. This will include both fiction and non fiction works. These titles include personal accounts that document the callousness, cruelty and tragedy of war while others demonstrate how the experience of war continues to inform a writer’s work long after a war has ended.

Two of our chosen authors, Irene Nemirovsky and Anne Frank did not survive the wars they witnessed. Their accounts demand our attention and demonstrate the enduring power of the human imagination and spirit over the bleak realities, and sense of hopelessness that accompanies war.

The Redmond-O'Brien Press Gang

RedmondJohn Redmond (1 September 1856 - 6 March 1918) was elected as MP in 1881 and became leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) in 1900. Redmond’s public support for the First World War meant the IPP became associated with the high Irish death toll, as depicted above. By 1918 both the party and Redmond himself were in terminal decline. He died of a heart attack on 6 March 1918 and the IPP was decimated in the election the following December.

St Patrick's Day Arrangements

St Patrick's Day PostcardDublin City Public Libraries will be closed from Saturday 17 March until Monday 19 March (inclusive).  Branch libraries will re-open on Tuesday, 20 March.

Image right: St Patrick's Day Souvenir Postcard from the Postcard Collection held at Dublin City Library & Archive.

Online Renewals

You may renew items on loan if they are not required by another library member. Your item record will indicate the current return date, the renewal date, and any fines outstanding on the item on display.

Dublin: One City One Book 2018

The Long Gaze BackArdmhéara Bhaile Átha Cliath Mícheál Mac Donncha, launches the 2018 Dublin: One City One Book programme of events today on the eve of International Women’s Day.

The Long Gaze BackAn Anthology of Irish Women Writers edited by Sinéad Gleeson, joins a long list of illustrious titles as this year’s featured book in the Dublin: One City One Book Festival. As suggested by the title, this book is rooted in the present with emerging writers, while looking back to the flag bearers of Irish women’s writing.

The month-long festival will feature dramatised readings, music, song and poetry, discussions with the featured authors, walking tours, talks on topics such as the tradition of women’s short fiction in Ireland, gender balance and anthologies, writing workshops, exhibitions and much more.  Many of the events are free. Check out Dublin: One City, One Book events on in our libraries.

Henry Campbell (Town Clerk of Dublin, 1893-1920)

Henry CampbellHenry Campbell was Private Secretary to Charles Stewart Parnell, leader of the Home Rule Party and supported him during ‘The Split’ arising from the controversy over the divorce of Mrs Kitty O’Shea. A native of Kilcoo, Co. Down, where he was born in 1856, Campbell was Home Rule MP for South Fermanagh in 1885 and 1886-92.  But when Parnell died suddenly in 1891, Campbell unexpectedly found himself without a job. He therefore applied for the post of Town Clerk of Dublin, which was the most senior post in Dublin Corporation.  Defeating seven other candidates, he was appointed on 24 May 1893 and, conscious that he did not have a background in local government, he said that he would leave no stone unturned to become a ‘capable and efficient servant in as short a time as possible.’

Drimnagh Castle, Dublin

Drimnagh CastleHidden from view by the more recent school buildings that share the name, Drimnagh Castle is a Norman Castle Keep located on the now named Long Mile Road, Drimnagh, Dublin.  The Castle was once home to the great Anglo-Norman Barnewall – also called deBarnwall or deBerneval -  family all of whom were descended from Hugh de Barnewall, who came to Ireland in 1212.  The influence of this family lasted over 400 years, and by 1395, when Reginald Barnewall held lands in Ballyfermot, Terenure, parts of Finglas as well as Drimnagh.

Drimnagh Castle, 1996. Dublin City Council Photographic Collection.