Latest from our Blog

Pembroke Library Re-Opens

Pembroke LibraryPembroke Branch Library re-opened after extensive refurbishment on Monday August 16th 2010!

Following the completion of improvement works, Dublin City Public Libraries were pleased to announce new and improved services at Pembroke Library, providing welcome ease of access for all. Improvements include:

Celebrating Dublin as the European Capital of Sport 2010

Carruth and McCulloughDublin City was awarded the title of European Capital of Sport 2010 by the European Capital of Sports Association (ACES). In recognition of this honour, Dublin City Public Libraries present a small selection of photos from the Dublin City Council Photographic Collection celebrating the proud sporting heritage of Dublin.

View Sports' Images from the Dublin City Council Photographic Collection.

2010 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award Shortlist and Winner

The TwinThe 2010 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award judging panel chose 8 titles to be shortlisted for the 2010 Award. These were selected from a (very) longlist of 156 novels, nominated by libraries all over the world. 

The shortlisted titles were

North Strand Bombing 1941

NSB06 North Strand RoadOn the night of 31 May 1941, four high-explosive bombs were dropped by German aircraft on the North Strand area of Dublin City. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. Charleville Mall Public Library was designated as the headquarters for the bombed area and City Architect Horace O’Rourke was in charge of the clearance project.

Search and Browse the North Strand Bombing Photographic Collection online.

Dublin City Library and Archive houses a collection of 57 photographs illustrating the aftermath of the North Strand Bombing, May 1941.

Treasures of the Irish Language: Some early examples from Dublin City Public Libraries

first book by the Franciscan Archbishop of Tuam, founder of St Anthony’s College, LouvainThe first book printed in the Irish language did not appear until 1571, over one hundred years after Gutenberg’s invention. The earliest works printed in Irish and using the Irish typeface were religious works commissioned by Queen Elizabeth I which aimed to convert Irish speakers to the reformed church. The first book published using the type specially cut for the printing of Irish was Aibidil Gaeidheilge agus Caiticiosma, by John O’Kearney, printed in 1571.

View Treasures of the Irish Language Image Gallery

Dublin Buildings

A selection of histories of Dublin buildings. These videos are designed as a resource for primary school children and second level students up to Junior Certificate.

Dublin Buildings on YouTube

Dublin's Foundations: A Viking Legacy

Viking skeletonFor three centuries, the Viking raiders of the North were the most feared pirates to haunt Europe's shores. At the end of the 8th century the great longboats slipped out of Scandinavia's fjords to begin a reign of terror. Thanks to their primary victims, the priests and monks of the early Christian churches, we have firsthand accounts of the pervasive fear the Viking threat instilled in medieval Europe. To be sure, the Vikings were fearsome warriors but the popular image of their murderous, pillaging ways only provides part of the picture!

Dublin: UNESCO City of Literature

Dublin UNESCO City of Literature logoDublin was formally designated as a UNESCO City of Literature on Monday, 26 July, 2010.

Dublin is one of only seven cities in the world with the designation of UNESCO: City of Literature.

The sought-after accolade was bestowed by the Director General of UNESCO and recognises Dublin’s cultural profile and its international standing as a city of literary excellence.

The Ireland Collection

JSTOR logoThe Ireland Collection is an interdisciplinary collection of journals and other materials. The Collection contains titles and resources across the arts, humanities, and sciences, in disciplines such as music, art, history, literature, archaeology, mathematics, and biology.

North Strand Bombing and the Emergency in Ireland

Photograph showing the damage following bombing of North Strand on 31st May 1941.The bombing of Dublin's North Strand by Nazi aircraft on 31st May 1941 was an assault on Ireland's neutrality. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. The North Strand Bombing and the Emergency in Ireland seminar featured talks about various aspects of the bombing including censorship, compensation, and the role of the emergency services. This full day seminar to commemorate the tragedy was held at Dublin City Library & Archive on Saturday 29th May 2010.

Volume 2 of the North Strand Bombings Oral History Project was also launched at the seminar. Initiated in 2009, the North Strand Bombing Oral History Project aims to collect eyewitness accounts of that fateful night and its aftermath. Search and browse the North Strand Bombing Oral History Project online.

Dublin City Archives hold a collection of 57 photographs illustrating the aftermath of the North Strand Bombing, May 1941. Search and browse the North Strand Bombing Photographs online. The photographs were commissioned by Dublin Corporation as evidence for the assessment of insurance claims. Read more about North Strand Bombing, 1941.

Feedback