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Dublin Buildings

A selection of histories of Dublin buildings. These videos are designed as a resource for primary school children and second level students up to Junior Certificate.

Dublin Buildings on YouTube

Dublin's Foundations: A Viking Legacy

Viking skeletonFor three centuries, the Viking raiders of the North were the most feared pirates to haunt Europe's shores. At the end of the 8th century the great longboats slipped out of Scandinavia's fjords to begin a reign of terror. Thanks to their primary victims, the priests and monks of the early Christian churches, we have firsthand accounts of the pervasive fear the Viking threat instilled in medieval Europe. To be sure, the Vikings were fearsome warriors but the popular image of their murderous, pillaging ways only provides part of the picture!

Dublin: UNESCO City of Literature

Dublin UNESCO City of Literature logoDublin was formally designated as a UNESCO City of Literature on Monday, 26 July, 2010.

Dublin is one of only seven cities in the world with the designation of UNESCO: City of Literature.

The sought-after accolade was bestowed by the Director General of UNESCO and recognises Dublin’s cultural profile and its international standing as a city of literary excellence.

North Strand Bombing and the Emergency in Ireland

Photograph showing the damage following bombing of North Strand on 31st May 1941.The bombing of Dublin's North Strand by Nazi aircraft on 31st May 1941 was an assault on Ireland's neutrality. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. The North Strand Bombing and the Emergency in Ireland seminar featured talks about various aspects of the bombing including censorship, compensation, and the role of the emergency services. This full day seminar to commemorate the tragedy was held at Dublin City Library & Archive on Saturday 29th May 2010.

Volume 2 of the North Strand Bombings Oral History Project was also launched at the seminar. Initiated in 2009, the North Strand Bombing Oral History Project aims to collect eyewitness accounts of that fateful night and its aftermath. Search and browse the North Strand Bombing Oral History Project online.

Dublin City Archives hold a collection of 57 photographs illustrating the aftermath of the North Strand Bombing, May 1941. Search and browse the North Strand Bombing Photographs online. The photographs were commissioned by Dublin Corporation as evidence for the assessment of insurance claims. Read more about North Strand Bombing, 1941.

Drumcondra Library Re-opens

Drumcondra LibraryDrumcondra Branch Library re-opened after extensive refurbishment on Monday May 24th!

Following the completion of improvement works, Dublin City Public Libraries are pleased to announce new and improved services at Drumcondra Library – providing welcome ease of access for all.

Improvements include:

Youth Zones

Games night at Coolock LibraryYouth Zones are now active in Cabra, Ballymun and Coolock libraries. The facilities are popular with all users who appreciate the comfortable seating, the extra study space and the new stock of books, magazines, music CDs and DVDs.

A dog is for life

Dog Trust Visit

Jillian Saunders and Coco from Dog Trust with children at Pembroke library.There was a hushed air of anticipation in Pembroke Library during one of our 'All In' summer events when Jillian Saunders with her dog Coco from the Dogs Trust visited. The children had never seen a dog in the library before and they gathered round not knowing what to expect and whether this kind of thing was allowed. After a few initial barks, Coco settled in and the children watched closely to see what part he would play in the event.

Becoming John Gray

Bookcover: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeListen to a talk by Jerusha McCormack on John Gray and celebrity culture. The lecture was held at Dublin City Library & Archive on 26 April 2010 as part of Dublin: One City, One Book 2010.

John Gray was an ordinary working-class man who, as the alleged model for the “Dorian” of Oscar Wilde’s novel, became a household name. How did this happen? Did Wilde in fact invent John Gray? What forces colluded to help manufacture this new kind of fame –known to us now as “celebrity culture” – and what was its price? By retelling the story of the man who became Dorian Gray, Jerusha McCormack seeks to throw new light on the power of Wilde’s novel: to create as well as to destroy those around him – and finally to conscript the very life of the author himself.

Listen to the talk [play time: 58:38 minutes]:

125 years of Dublin City Libraries 1884-2009

Dublin City Library & ArchiveOpening of the Public Libraries. 
The Freeman’s Journal, Thursday, October 2, 1884.

"Yesterday, at four o’clock, escorted by mounted police and the mace and sword-bearer, with the insignia of their office, the Right Hon. The Lord Mayor M.P, opened at 100 Capel Street the first public library and reading room, under the Public Libraries Act of 1855, which has been built in Dublin ...At a quarter to five o’clock his lordship, accompanied by his private staff and the civic officers, and escorted as before, arrived at 23 Thomas Street, where the second free library [was] situated ..In declaring it also open ...he hoped that all would be found sitting side by side, furnishing storing their minds with that knowledge, the possession of which ensured success."

The beginnings of Dublin’s public libraries can be traced to the Public Libraries (Ireland) Act of 1855 which empowered councils of municipal boroughs and towns with populations in excess of 5,000 or more, to establish free public libraries and also museums or schools of science and, or art.

Leabhair Gaeilge

Old and modern books in Irish held in the collections of Dublin City Library and Archive.

Leabhair Gaeilge idir sean agus nua i Leabharlann agus Cartlann Chathair Bhaile Átha Cliath.

SEE Dublin and Irish Collections.

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