Dublin City Library & Archive

Irish Texts Society

Volume 1, 1899: Giolla an Fhiugha or the Lad of the Ferule, & Eachtra Clainne Rí na hIorua or Adventures of the King of Norway, edited, with translation and notes by Douglas HydeThe Irish Texts Society was founded in London in 1898. The initiative to establish the Irish Texts Society came from another Irish organisation based in London, the Irish Literary Society (ILS), founded in 1892. According to the 1895-6 annual report of the ILS “preliminary steps have been taken to form an Irish Texts Society for the publication of modern Irish works”. As a result a provisional sub-committee was appointed to investigate the project. By May of 1897 the sub-committee was in a position to address questions of finance, membership of the projected Society, the identification of suitable texts for editing, the appointment of editors and of a publisher.

Image right: Volume 1, 1899: Giolla an Fhiugha or the Lad of the Ferule, & Eachtra Clainne Rí na hIorua or Adventures of the King of Norway, edited, with translation and notes by Douglas Hyde (click on image for larger version)

Jobs for the girls!

Dublin City of Science 2012 logoInternational Women's Day logoApart from a little maths, the nearest thing to science I ever studied in school was Domestic Science. While knowing how to cook and sew is undoubtedly very useful, I am painfully aware that huge swathes of knowledge are beyond my comprehension and always will be.

There is always a chance I can answer a literature question on University Challenge, maybe even the odd music or film question, but science subjects are a complete mystery. Don't even understand the questions most of the time.

Yes, my knowledge of science is based entirely on what I have learned from watching 'The Big Bang Theory' - and while I have great sympathy for that cat in the box, I'm not sure I really get it.

North Strand Bombing, a Documentary

Why not pop along this Saturday (18 June) at 2.00 pm and view a screening of a new documentary on the North Strand Bombing at Charleville Mall Library? Entry is free and all are welcome.

About the North Strand Bombing

The bombing of Dublin's North Strand was the most serious atrocity inflicted on neutral Eire during the Second World War. Four high-explosive bombs were dropped by German aircraft on the North Strand area of Dublin City on 31 May 1941. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed.

Ceramics for the Senses

Visit  “Ceramics for the Senses”, a tactile exhibition by ceramic artist, Eleanor Swan at the Dublin City Library & Archive, 138-144 Pearse St. Dublin 2. Eleanor’s work comprises of ceramic pieces based on the portraits of Francis Bacon. They offer the opportunity to experience art through touch, and challenge our perceptions of art and how we display and experience it. These portraits can be enjoyed by everyone including blind people and people with all levels of visual capability.

North Strand Bombing 1941

NSB06 North Strand RoadOn the night of 31 May 1941, four high-explosive bombs were dropped by German aircraft on the North Strand area of Dublin City. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. Charleville Mall Public Library was designated as the headquarters for the bombed area and City Architect Horace O’Rourke was in charge of the clearance project.

Search and Browse the North Strand Bombing Photographic Collection online.

Dublin City Library and Archive houses a collection of 57 photographs illustrating the aftermath of the North Strand Bombing, May 1941.

Treasures of the Irish Language: Some early examples from Dublin City Public Libraries

first book by the Franciscan Archbishop of Tuam, founder of St Anthony’s College, LouvainThe first book printed in the Irish language did not appear until 1571, over one hundred years after Gutenberg’s invention. The earliest works printed in Irish and using the Irish typeface were religious works commissioned by Queen Elizabeth I which aimed to convert Irish speakers to the reformed church. The first book published using the type specially cut for the printing of Irish was Aibidil Gaeidheilge agus Caiticiosma, by John O’Kearney, printed in 1571.

View Treasures of the Irish Language Image Gallery

North Strand Bombing and the Emergency in Ireland

Photograph showing the damage following bombing of North Strand on 31st May 1941.The bombing of Dublin's North Strand by Nazi aircraft on 31st May 1941 was an assault on Ireland's neutrality. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. The North Strand Bombing and the Emergency in Ireland seminar featured talks about various aspects of the bombing including censorship, compensation, and the role of the emergency services. This full day seminar to commemorate the tragedy was held at Dublin City Library & Archive on Saturday 29th May 2010.

Volume 2 of the North Strand Bombings Oral History Project was also launched at the seminar. Initiated in 2009, the North Strand Bombing Oral History Project aims to collect eyewitness accounts of that fateful night and its aftermath. Search and browse the North Strand Bombing Oral History Project online.

Dublin City Archives hold a collection of 57 photographs illustrating the aftermath of the North Strand Bombing, May 1941. Search and browse the North Strand Bombing Photographs online. The photographs were commissioned by Dublin Corporation as evidence for the assessment of insurance claims. Read more about North Strand Bombing, 1941.

Leabhair Gaeilge

Old and modern books in Irish held in the collections of Dublin City Library and Archive.

Leabhair Gaeilge idir sean agus nua i Leabharlann agus Cartlann Chathair Bhaile Átha Cliath.

SEE Dublin and Irish Collections.

Dublin City Public Libraries 1884-2009

Charleville Mall Library'Dublin City Public Libraries 1884-2009: 125 years of service to the community', a talk by Deirdre Ellis-King, Dublin City Librarian commemorates 125 years of Public Library Service in Dublin City. The talk was part of Local History Day 26 September, 2009.

Image right: Charleville Mall Library

Transcript

Dublin in 1608

Early Modern Dubliners by Maighread Ní MhurchadhaDublin City has a remarkable collection of historical documents, many of which are under the care of Dublin City Public Libraries and Archive. Dr Maighread Ní Mhurchadha has drawn on the contents of these and other records to tell the stories of some of Dublin's residents during the Renaissance period in her book Early Modern Dubliners. Despite many difficulties, including plague, riots, the threat of war and serious religious differences, the citizens combined to maintain a spirit of independence, a belief in the importance of their city and a strong sense of community, often using unorthodox means to achieve their ends and, occasionally, even managing to enjoy themselves!

This talk marked the launch of the Early Modern Dubliners on the 28th August, 2008.

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