Dublin City Library & Archive

William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

WB YeatsWilliam Butler Yeats, known to friends and family as Willie, was born in Sandymount Avenue, Dublin, on 13 June 1865. He was the eldest son of John Butler Yeats, portrait painter, and his wife Susan Pollexfen, whose family came from County Sligo. The family moved to London when Willie was a baby and remained there until 1880, but he spent his summers with his mother’s family in Sligo. When the family returned to Dublin he attended the High School in Harcourt Street. He originally studied art at the Metropolitan School of Art and the Royal Hibernian Academy School, but later decided to devote himself to literature, especially poetry and drama.

Computer/Internet Access Affected, Finglas Library, 21 May

Finglas LibraryTo facilitate Surfbox printer installation, there is no computer access in Finglas Library on Thursday, 21st May. Internet access is via Wi-Fi only. Our sincere apologies.

Print - Scan - Copy. Improved Printing Service.

In addition to using a library computer to have your document printed, the Surfbox service allows you to email the job, upload it to the web or use the HP ePrint app on your phone or tablet. Read more about the Surfbox printing service.

Contact Finglas Library.

Tragedy off the south coast – Sir Hugh Lane one of the casualties

Freeman JournalDublin, Monday, 10 May 1915. Following the tragic loss of RMS Lusitania, on Friday afternoon 7 May, off the south coast of Ireland near the Old Head of Kinsale, in which 1,198 passengers and crew were drowned, it is reported that Sir Hugh Lane, benefactor to this city, is among the casualties. The ship, en route from New York to Liverpool, with civilian passengers, seems to have been torpedoed by a German U-Boat.

Remembering Gallipoli - Books and Exhibitions

Memorial Book CollectionTwo complementary exhibitions were launched yesterday in the Dublin City Library and Archive. These are the 'Çanakkale: Road to Peace out of War' and the 'Fragments: Stories from Gallipoli 1915' displays which will appear in the Dublin City Public Library and Archive from Wednesday, 22 April, 2015 until Friday, 29 May, 2015.

The 'Fragments: Stories from Gallipoli 1915' exhibition, curated by Dublin City Archives, draws mainly on sources from the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association Archive which is held at Dublin City Library and Archive. It gives an overview of the failed 1915 Campaign by the Allies and highlights the personal experiences of a number of Irish-born World War I soldiers who fought in Gallipoli by utilising diaries, photographs and correspondences.

Picturing Dublin in the late 20th century

 Screen Cinema A remarkable collection of photographs held at Dublin City Library and Archive brings Dublin of the late 20th century to life. The Donal McEnroe Photographic Collection, comprising some 17,000 images, puts the spotlight on life in the capital from the late 1970s to the early 2000s. Covering people, places, events, transport, shops, social issues and Dublin by night, the collection captures everyday life in the city. The range and quality of the images makes this collection very suitable for digitisation.

Gilbert Lecture - Pictures

Kevin WhelanThe 18th annual Sir John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture, 'Dublin as a global city: through time and space' was given by Kevin Whelan, Director, Keough-Naughton Institute, Notre Dame Centre in Dublin at the Dublin City Library & Archive on Thursday 22 January at 6pm.

A slideshow of photographs from the event is posted below.

 

Art and Architecture of Ireland, 5 Volume Set

Dublin City Library & Archive is delighted to receive a donation of the full 5 Volume Set of 'Art & Architecture of Ireland' from the Royal Irish Academy. The Volumes can be accessed in the Reading Room in the Dublin City Library & Archive in Pearse Street, Dublin 1.

5 Volume set of Art & Architecture in Ireland

(Click above image to view larger version)

'Art and Architecture of Ireland' is a five-volume scholarly work which spans the period from medieval times through to the end of the twentieth century. The complete set includes: Volume I: Medieval c.400-1600, Volume II: Painting 1600-1900, Volume III: Sculpture 1600-2000, Volume IV: Architecture, and Volume V: Twentieth century.

Christmas at the Front: Insights from the Monica Roberts Collection

Christmas CardThe Monica Roberts Collection Database is well-worth examining for insights into the personal stories of Irish soldiers fighting at the Front and their experiences at Christmas time.

Dublin at War

UniformsView 'Dublin at War' Image Gallery.

The period 1914 to 1918 was the last time Ireland was involved as a combatant in war on an international scale. Though we cannot say that Ireland has been a country at peace, during the past hundred years it has not suffered from the fear of invasion, the loss of thousands of young lives and the hardship of full-scale war.

At the time of the outbreak of World War I, nationalist Ireland was eagerly awaiting the introduction of Home Rule, while unionists were preparing to use all means within their power to prevent it. When the war began, Irishmen were called on to join the fight against the German Empire, placing national politics to one side for the duration of the war, with the promise of Home Rule at the end of it. At local level, Dublin, a city suffering great poverty, rife with disease and almost uninhabitable slums, had these major civic issues pushed into the background by the outbreak of war. Dublin was also a city with a tradition of having a strong military presence, and during the war years Dubliners bore witness to thousands of soldiers passing through their streets to embark for England for training or to return to the Front.  In terms of everyday life, the coming of war also resulted in food and fuel shortages and more restricted movement in terms of social life and entertainment.

Mount Street Club: A unique response to unemployment in Dublin

Exhibition Room at Dublin City Library and ArchiveA fascinating new exhibition about the Mount Street Club was launched on Monday 1 Dec at Dublin City Library and Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street, D2 and is now open to public until 23 December 2014.The exhibition was curated by Dominic and Sarah Perrem on behalf of the Mount Street Club Trust and it provides an illustrated chronology of the work of the  Club over an 80 year period.

The original items on display in glass cabinets are  from the archives of the Mount Street Club  held at Dublin City Library and Archive.  It also includes photographs from the Dublin City Photographic Collection  which highlight the poor living conditions of many Dubliners in 1930s-1960s and an RTÉ documentary about the history of the Club.

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