Rathmines Library

Furry Friends at Rathmines Library

My Cat GingerDuring February 2018, Rathmines Library hosted Tarsila Kruse’s exhibition 100 days of Dogs, which features gorgeous illustrations of man's best friend from her new book.  Inspired by Tarsila's exhibition, Rathmines Library decided to hold an art competition, inviting children to draw their own companion animal – whether it was one from a story, an imaginary beast or their own pet.  We were delighted with the results!  The competition entries, which reveal artistic skill, a love for animals, and a sense of fun, went on display in Rathmines Library during March.

Many thanks to all the children who submitted pictures and congratulations to the winners:

Clear it Out!

bagsWhen you open your wardrobe do you risk life and limb from the ensuing avalanche of clothing that you have kept since your first communion? Are you afraid to look in your attic lest you discover, behind the heaving boxes of ancient Christmas decorations, the earthly remains of Shergar? Would your shoe collection make Imelda Marcos weep tears of sheer joy? Do your kitchen cupboards make you speculate, like Disney’s Ariel, as to ‘How many wonders can one cavern hold?’

If so then help is at hand! For the month of April Rathmines library will be hosting a display of books on de-cluttering your home to help you get rid of all the junk and unwanted bits and bobs that you may have accumulated over the years so you can create more space and enjoy a more organised, harmonious environment.

Witnesses to War

Suite FrancaiseAs 2018 marks the centenary of the end of the First World War, Rathmines Library will host a book display called Witnesses to War throughout the month of March. This will include both fiction and non fiction works. These titles include personal accounts that document the callousness, cruelty and tragedy of war while others demonstrate how the experience of war continues to inform a writer’s work long after a war has ended.

Two of our chosen authors, Irene Nemirovsky and Anne Frank did not survive the wars they witnessed. Their accounts demand our attention and demonstrate the enduring power of the human imagination and spirit over the bleak realities, and sense of hopelessness that accompanies war.

Dogs Days in Rathmines

dog by Tarsila KruseFor the month of February, Rathmines Library will be going to the dogs, or rather, the dogs will be coming to us!  Tarsila Kruse’s exhibition, 100 days of Dogs, will be visited by 200 local schoolchildren, we will be running a Paws and Claws Animals in Literature Quiz and Canine Capers, two doggy-themed films, will be shown  in the library on the afternoons of 16th and 17th February.

For schools, we will have some very special visitors to library. Their minders will also be along  tell us about the valuable work they do in the community.

Rathmines Readers – looking back

Rathmines Library 1978Rathmines Library has been sent a poem by one of its users – it gives a real sense of the “old days” in the library, which has always had a particular ambience of its own. There will be many of us who remember the old newspaper room and the spiral staircase with great affection.  Here’s an extract from the poem, the work of the writer Berni Dwan, who has kindly given us permission to publish it:

My Saturday pilgrimage to the object of my love, to
the blushing sarcophagus of printed matter, starts early afternoon.
My destination – Rathmines Library, gifted to Dubliners by altruistic Carnegie;
opened in October 1913 in the maelstrom of the Lockout. Its classical
façade a perfect street companion for the Marrakech pink town hall across the road.

THINK! Book display at Rathmines for the month of November

Think!In an online world that is connected 24/7 we have never had access to so much information; so much so that people sometimes feel overwhelmed. We are constantly subjected to conflicting messages from pundits, advertisers, politicians and talking heads and many ideas in public and political discourse are greatly contested, such as global warming or the safety of vaccines. Additionally, much public debate has arisen concerning the veracity of many information sources often accompanied by claims of ‘fake news’.

For the month of November Rathmines library will be hosting a book display featuring many titles on the topic of critical thinking which will aid readers in discerning just how reliable many of the claims with which we are constantly bombarded really are.

The Irish Revolution 1917-1923 - Maeve Casserly

The Irish RevolutionWhat happened in Ireland after the 1916 Rising? How did the political, economic and social landscape change and what brought about independence in 1922? Listen back to a three-part lecture series delivered by Maeve Casserly Dublin City Council’s Historians-in-Residence for the South East Area.  The lecture topics are:

  • Lecture 1 - Ireland in 1917
  • Lecture 2 - What was the War of Independence?
  • Lecture 3 - What was the Civil War?

Notes from Underground

Rathmines basement booksRathmines Library staff are digging deep to let their readers know about some of the great books hidden in the library basement! Readers may not be aware that there is a whole floor of books stored below the library – though they may have seen “Basement” marked in bright yellow letters on some of the books they have requested.

Feeling the itch to get writing?

Dublin in the Coming TimesBookings are now being taken for a series of Creative Writing Workshops in Rathmines Library. The sessions will be held at 6.00pm on the 8, 15 and 22 May, courtesy of the Dublin in the Coming Times initiative. We are hoping to form a regular creative writing group from those attending the workshops, so if you have ever felt the yen to get your thoughts down on paper or start that novel that has been brewing inside for years, why not come along?

Got Talent - Young Illustrator’s Exhibition

Life of PiDuring January, children between the ages of eight and twelve were invited to send in illustrations for their favourite book to Rathmines Library.

There were many wonderful drawings and paintings submitted, and staff had a hard time making a choice, but in the end the winner was Alice Lenehan  with “The Sky of Pi” (we loved the title), an illustration for the book The Life of Pi. Special mention must also be made of Coco O’Driscoll’s illustration of Michael Morpurgo’s book, Sparrow. And given the wide age range involved, we thought it only fair to give an extra prize in the under ten category. The winner here was Max Egan for his illustration from The Salmon of Knowledge legend, called The Catch.

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