Can a Directly Elected Mayor work for Dublin?

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We want your opinion!
 
Dublin’s four Local Authorities are calling on you to have your say on the proposal of having a Directly Elected Mayor for Dublin.  A Mayor chosen by you!
 
To get this process underway The Lord Mayor of Dublin City, Mayors of Fingal and South Dublin  and Cathaoirleach of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown  are engaging in a public consultation from Monday, 16th September, 2013,  asking Dubliners or those with an interest in Dublin,  to complete a survey and/or make a submission on the topic at their Local Library, Council Office.

 
This survey will let us know if you would like to have a Directly Elected Mayor for Dublin and what kind of powers you would like this Mayor to have.  Would you like a Mayor with strong executive powers or a Mayor with a strong representational role with no executive powers? You can also make a short submission on the issue and avail of a background paper prepared by Dr. Philip Byrne, (Institute of Public Administration), which discusses some of the issues involved with a Directly Elected Mayor. A recent poll of Dubliners, ‘Your Dublin, Your Voice’, showed that 61% of those surveyed were in favour of the concept (see Notes to Editor).
 
Earlier this year, The Minister for Environment, Community and Local Government, in ‘Putting People First’, asked Dublin’s four Local Authorities to consider the options for the introduction of a Directly Elected Mayor for all of Dublin.  This public consultation forms part of that process. It is intended to ask Dublin voters if they agree to having a Directly Elected Mayor, or not, in a plebiscite in May 2014, during the local elections.
 
The closing date for completion of the survey and for making a submission is on or before Saturday, 12th October, 2013.
 
The Lord Mayor, Mayors and Cathaoirleach will formally launch the Public Consultation process and be available for interview at Mayor Square, Dublin 1 at 12 noon on Sunday, 15th September, 2013.
 
Please note website will not go live until Monday, 16th September, 2013.
 
 
ENDS
 
 
 
For further information contact:
 
Dublin City Council Media Relations Office T. (01) 222 2170

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council

Fingal County Council M. 087 4141580

South Dublin County Council T. ( 01) 4149285,  

Notes to the Editor:

Quotes

Lord Mayor of Dublin Oisín Quinn said “As the first citizen of Dublin City, I want to encourage all Dubliners to tell us what you think Dublin needs in a leader to promote the city on the world stage. I am especially pleased that by making submissions and filling out our survey, Dubliners are being offered an opportunity to have real input into the proposals for a Directly Elected Mayor for Dublin. I call on everyone to grasp this opportunity to get involved and help form a decision on Dublin's future.”

“I am delighted to be part of this process and I urge all residents of Dublin City and County to participate in the public consultation process.   Let your voice be heard by completing the survey, making a submission or attending a workshop or meeting”, said  Councillor Carrie Smyth, Cathaoirleach,  Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council at the launch of the public consultation for the proposed Directly Elected Mayor.

“A directly elected Mayor could mean significant change to how local government is delivered in our Capital”, said Mayor of Fingal, Cllr. Kieran Dennison.  “This proposal gives all Dubliners a vital opportunity to have a voice and tell us if they need or want a directly elected Mayor, and if so, what kind of Mayor Dublin should have,” the Mayor continued.  “Fingal residents will have a different perspective to those in the city and I encourage everyone in Fingal to take part in this important consultation to make sure their voice is heard”, the Mayor said.

"We have four local authorities and hundreds of communities from the Mountains to the North County, and from the Liffey Valley to Dublin Bay, but Dubliners are united in a sense of place; one county and one city. This process gives Dubs the chance to have our say in whether or not we should have a directly-elected Mayor, and what kind of Mayor that might be. There is huge interest from people across the city and county in issues of representation, governance and service provision. This is a unique opportunity for Dubliners and those interested in Dublin to have their say on the issue of the Directly-Elected Mayor, and one I believe will be taken up with great interest." said Cllr. Dermot Looney, Mayor, South Dublin County Council.
 
‘Your Dublin, Your Voice’ Survey Results (July 2013)

Respondents were asked if they thought that Dublin should have a DEM.

  • 61% felt that Dublin should have a DEM, 14% said it should not, while 25% were not sure;
  • Respondents from each of the 4 Dublin Local Authority Areas were asked to indicate their level of agreement with a series of statements relating to the possibility of having a DEM for Dublin.
  • 41% of respondents agreed or strongly agree with the statement “A directly elected mayor of Dublin would be able to attract investment into the Dublin region”.
  • 55% of respondents agreed or strongly agree with the statement “A directly elected mayor of Dublin would give the city an improved global identity”.
  • 52% of respondents agreed or strongly agree with the statement “A directly elected mayor would improve how Dublin is managed and run”.
  • 23% of respondents agreed or strongly agree with the statement “The rest of Ireland would benefit from Dublin having a directly elected mayor”.
  • 46% of respondents felt that a directly elected mayor of Dublin should govern the County Dublin area. 

Respondents who indicated that they did not think Dublin should have a directly elected mayor were asked to give their reasons for this.  These reasons were categorised after data collection and the breakdown of these categories is presented below.  40% (82 mentions) of those objecting to the idea of a directly elected mayor for Dublin cited the cost of implementing the role as the reason for their objection.  20% (41 mentions) felt it had no real power or impact. 12% (25 mentions) felt the role would be too political. 

Respondents were presented with a list of policy areas and asked which potential areas they felt a directly elected mayor of Dublin should have power or some power over.  Respondents could select as many of the policy areas as they wished.

  • 74% of respondents felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Community Services.
  • 69% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Transport.
  • 68% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Waste & Environment.
  • 64% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Planning.
  • 54% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Economic Development.
  • 53% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Housing.
  • 52% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Water Services.
  • 47% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Policing & Emergency Services.
  • 32% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over International Relations.
  • 25% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Education
  • 22% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Social Welfare & Services.
  • 19% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over Health.
  • 2% felt that a directly elected mayor should have power or some power over ‘Other’ Services
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