Pollinators in City Parks and Gardens

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Dublin City parks and gardens provide important habitat for pollinators - mainly insects and bats.  We in turn depend on pollinators for successful crops of fruits and vegetables and also for our native plants to survive.  Why not plant your garden with trees, shrubs, flowers and bulbs to attract these important animals? Our native Irish bee species are in decline, but are worth €85 million to the Irish economy each year, according to the Department of the Environment.

Parks for bees

Some of our parks have been surveyed in 2002 for bees by Dr. Mark Brown, TCD. Records show:

Bull Island:

  • Bombus lapidaries*
  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus muscorum*
  • Bombus pascuorum
  • Bombus lucorum agg

 

Eamonn Ceannt Park

  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus pascuorum
  • Bombus terrestris

 

Fairview Park

  • Bombus hortorum
  • Bombus lapidaries*
  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus muscorum*
  • Bombus pascuorum
  • Bombus pratorum
  • Bombus terrestris

 

Harold's Cross Park

  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus pascuorum
  • Bombus pratorum
  • Bombus terrestris

 

Merrion Square

  • Bombus hortorum
  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus pascuorum
  • Bombus pratorum
  • Bombus terrestris

 

Mountjoy Square

  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus pratorum
  • Bombus terrestris

 

St Anne's Park

  • Andrena bicolor
  • Bombus jonellus
  • Bombus lucorum agg
  • Bombus muscorum*
  • Bombus pascuorum
  • Bombus terrestris
  • Lasioglossum calceatum
  • Osmia rufa

*near threatened species

For more information

For more information on pollinators generally, or to submit records on bees you have seen in parks and gardens in Dublin, go to the National Biodiversity Data Centre's website: http://pollinators.biodiversityireland.ie/

Trinity College has an excellent website to promote awareness of bees in Ireland: http://www.tcd.ie/Zoology/research/

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