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Gardeners' World: Digital magazine of the month

Gardener's WorldGardeners' World is packed with practical advice from your favourite gardening experts.

Gardeners' World Magazine includes regular contributions and features from the top names in BBC gardening. In this month's issue design duo Joe Swift and Nick Bailey share their wisdom, to help us make our gardens - however small - spaces that we can enjoy all year round.

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Anne Kennedy Photograph Collection

AK0084 Children musicansAnne Kennedy was a notable poet, writer, and photographer. She was born Anne Spaulding on 19 March 1935 in Los Angeles, California to Beatrice Clarke and Easton Spaulding. She attended the prestigious Marlborough School in Beverley Hills as Anne Hoag after her mother’s marriage to her second husband, Hallack Hoag.  At age 16, Anne went to study English at Stanford University. In 1955, she married Donald Nealy, with whom she had two daughters, Allison (1956) and Catherine (1957). After her divorce from her first husband, Anne returned to Los Angeles where she met her second husband, Lewis Judd. They married in upstate New York in 1961 and had a daughter, Stephanie, in 1963, by which time they had moved back to Los Angeles. During the 1960s, Anne worked as a high school teacher and lived in the Laurel Canyon area of Los Angeles. As a lifelong lover of jazz, together with her close friend and jazz trumpeter Rex Stewart, she interviewed many jazz musicians living in the L.A. area during this time. The oral material they gathered was contributed to the Duke Ellington archive at the Smithsonian Museum of American History, Washington, D.C. in 1993.

View Anne Kennedy Photographic Collection Image Gallery.

Evolution of the Computer: from mainframes to current technologies

boardAn evolution has occurred with bit / byte data that has transformed the IT world over the last 60 years. The logic of inputting a code to a system, processing that code and then producing a result, or the arithmetic / logical operation was the basic groundings for the first bit-serial binary computer in the late 1940s.

The first computing generation occurred from 1942 to 1955 with the Mainframe Computer, a machine which used vacuum tube technology to make electronic digital computers. The first bit-serial binary computer was the BINAC which was launched in 1949. It could calculate data in milliseconds. Next was the ‘ENIAC - a first electronic general-purpose computer which could solve ‘a large class of numerical problems’ through reprogramming. Other computer manufacturers followed suit.

Notes from Underground

Rathmines basement booksRathmines Library staff are digging deep to let their readers know about some of the great books hidden in the library basement! Readers may not be aware that there is a whole floor of books stored below the library – though they may have seen “Basement” marked in bright yellow letters on some of the books they have requested.

Manuscript of the Month: Reformation 01

Reformation 01The Monastery of All Saints (usually called All Hallows) was founded by Dermot Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster, in 1166 – it is said, as an act of penance for eloping with Dervorgilla, wife of Tiernan O’Rourke.  It was an Augustinian foundation, and the monastery buildings were situated to the east of Dublin City, outside the city walls.  This was a precarious location, and the monastery and its immediate lands were sacked by the O’Byrnes and O’Tooles of Wicklow on a regular basis.  Nevertheless, All Hallows quickly became the wealthiest monastery in the Dublin area, as it received donations from pious benefactors of land in counties Dublin, Meath, Kildare, Louth, Tipperary and Kilkenny. In 1478, the Prior of All Hallows was appointed as Admiral of the Port of Baldoyle, a most prestigious position. At the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the surrender of the Priory and lands of All Hallows to King Henry VIII was undertaken by Prior Walter Handcock (16 Nov 1538) with (18 Nov 1538) memorandum attesting to the voluntary nature of the surrender witnessed by Symon Geoffrey, rector of Howth, Thomas Alen, gentleman, and others.  (DCLA/Recorder’s Book, entry No. 12-12a).  It was noted that at the time of surrender there were only four monks in All Hallows.

News from Nelson: Absent Friends

filming nelsonWhen you reach my age – 209 and counting - you start to think about your old friends and long to meet up with them for a chat.  So I was delighted when Ken Dolan called in to see me the other morning. It was an important occasion – we were both being interviewed by the BBC for ‘The One Show’ which is hugely popular.   Nowadays Ken is a distinguished academic at the National College of Art and Design but in 1966 he was an impecunious student there and like many young men he was eager for the craic.  At that stage I had been blown off my Pillar and was nursing my wounds amid the remnants of my dignity, in a Dublin Corporation storage depot. St. Patrick’s Day arrived and it was cold and wet as usual – when over the wall came seven fit young men.  Acting together, they managed to lift me  – I’m really very heavy – and then they scarpered off, bringing me with them.

The IRA in the Twilight Years

IRA, June 1932Listen back to Dr Brian Hanley discussing the IRA and Nazi Germany during the 1930s and 1940s.  Brian details the growth of the IRA during this era, looks at key IRA figures, and cites examples of conflict with 1932 Fianna Fáil government, the Blue Shirts and the Gardaí.  He discusses IRA contact with Germany in the hope of gaining support and arms to attack Britain. Brian also looks at how an escalating campaign of IRA violence led to politicians fearing it would cause problems for Irish neutrality during the Emergency. 

Brian Hanley is a historian and author. He has written widely on Irish republicanism and radicalism, including The IRA: A documentary history, 1916-2005, The IRA, 1926-36 and (with Scott Millar The Lost Revolution: the Story of the Official IRA and the Workers Party. He is currently Historian in Residence at Dublin City Library and Archives, 2017. His areas of expertise include society, politics and culture of 19th and 20th century Ireland, on the Irish Revolution and Civil War, on the IRA from 1923-2005.

Fun at the Rose Festival 2017

Rose FestivalWe had lots of fun in the library tent and mobile library at the Rose Festival in St Anne's Park Raheny on Saturday 15 and Sunday 16 July 2017. It was a busy day full of books and reading themed events, arts and crafts and performance.  Ruth Concannon, Reader in Residence at Dublin City Public Libraries read stories to younger children in our library tent and Book Advisors Patricia and Catherine enjoyed chatting to children about what they like to read and offering some book recommendations.  Lots of young readers dropped by to find out about the best summer reads and sign up for our Summer Stars Reading challenge.

Two Irish Authors on 2017 Man Booker Longlist

Barry McCormackCongrats to Sebastian Barry and Mike McCormack, who both make the 2017 Man Booker longlist. Of the thirteen authors longlisted, probably the most notable inclusion is Indian author Arundhati Roy who won the prize 20 years ago for her debut novel 'The God of Small Things', and who is now longlisted for her second only novel, 'The Ministry of Utmost Happiness'.

Sebastian Barry's novel 'Days Without End' was announced the winner of the Costa Book of the Year Award back in January of this year. Mike McCormack's' Solar Bones' was awarded the Goldsmith Prize in November 2016; this award celebrates innovative fiction. 'Solar Bones' was also chosen as the Eason Book Club Novel of the Year in the same month. The last Irish winner was Anne Enright in 2007 for 'The Gathering'.

Dublin and the Great War 1914-18

Dublin & WW1Listen back to a series of three talks on the topic of Dublin and the Great War hosted by Near FM in Coolock Library this April. The talks looked at a range of subjects including women in war time, anti-war agitation, the influence of the Russian Revolution and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and includes songs from the era performed by An Góilín Singers.

In the first talk, Near FM's Ciarán Murrary talks to Pádraig Yeates about the influence of the Russian Revolution and to John Dorney about anti-war agitation in Dublin, socialists, pacifists and republicans. Fergus Russell from An Góilín sings songs from the era. Recorded at Coolock Library on 5 April 2017.

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