Speed Review - Frequently Asked Questions:

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  1. Why is Dublin City Council carrying out this Public Consultation?
  2. 30km/h Zone Expansion
  3. What is the purpose of this public consultation?
  4. What is the public being asked to do?
  5. What is the benefit of lower speed limits, particularly in residential areas and around schools?
  6. Where are the 30km/hr speed limits in Dublin at present?
  7. Do the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19) affect the arterial roads in and out of Dublin City Centre?
  8. Why not all the arterial roads were made 30 km/h?
  9. Where can I have access to the info on the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19)/and where can I submit my representation?
  10. If the Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws are adopted, when will the rollout of the expanded 30km/hr happen?
  11. Is there any additional Road Safety measures being progressed to compliment the proposed bye-laws?
  12. How will we monitor the affects of the proposed bye-laws should they be introduced?
  13. How do the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws become Law?
  14. Why are submissions from the public important?
  15. Where can get more information on road safety and the impact of lower speed limits?
  16. What other countries or cities are introducing 30km/hr speed limits or the equivalent?

Why is Dublin City Council carrying out this Public Consultation?

COVID19 has radically changed transport in our City. Dublin City Council and the National Transport Authority have had to put a Strategic Programme together to get Dublin ready for when more people are coming back into the City.

Due to COVID19 restrictions reduced traffic levels have resulted in many positive impacts including cleaner air, less noise pollution and an increase in people walking and cycling in their local neighborhoods. Less people will be able to travel on public transport and more people will need to be accommodated on other modes. Consequently, there will be many more people cycling each day as well as an increase in the numbers walking and, as happens at the moment, people stepping out into the carriageway to socially distance from other pedestrians.

The goal of this programme is to allow the city to function under the new arrangements arising from the COVID19 public health emergency, both in terms of providing space for safe movement plus business activities, and in accommodating the changed transport patterns.

As outlined at the Interim Mobility Intervention Programme for Dublin City, Dublin City Council has committed to a review speed limits in the city.

The measures developed in response to a new and unprecedented emergency caused by the COVID19 pandemic are being implemented on a temporary/emergency basis to respond to the urgent and immediate needs of the city.

In line with other European cities consideration is been given to reducing vehicular speed limits on many of the routes to 30 km/h, in order to protect the larger numbers of pedestrians, cyclists and vulnerable road users moving around in these areas and on the road carriageway.

30 km/h Zone Expansion:

Having reviewed the network around the city, taking factors such as road legibility, road classification, length of road, speed limits of the roads that intersect with the other Local Authorities boundaries (i.e. Fingal, South Dublin and Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Councils), etc into account, Dublin City Council is proposing a new concept for the speed reduction within this phase.

At present all roads in the Dublin City Council area have a default speed limit of 50 kilometres per hour, where the posted speed limit varies from this speed the roads are specifically listed in the Speed Bye Laws, for example roads with 80, 60 and 30 kms/hour are listed individually but not the roads with 50 km/h, as this is the default.

It is now proposed to change the default speed limit from 50 kilometres per hour to 30 kilometres per hour and this would now be the default speed limit on all roads in the Dublin City Council administrative area as specified in the attached map, except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws. This will aid in clarity for all road users as except where specifically signed, all roads should now be assumed to have a 30km/h limit.

This expansion will not only focus on the core reasons for the speed limit but also take cognisance of the many representations received over the course of the pandemic. This measure will build on the 30km/h zones already established, make it safer for more people to walk and cycle and will also assist in making the city a safer place for everyone. It is planned to proceed where possible and grow the zones organically providing consistency throughout various areas as motorists move through them.

Dublin City Council wish to engage through public consultation with members of the public with regard to the expansion of the 30km/h speed limit in all roads of the city, except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws. 

The application of special speed limits is being undertaken in accordance with the ‘Guidelines for Setting & Managing Speed Limits in Ireland’ (March 2015), published by the Department of Transport Tourism & Sport. The Road Traffic Act of 2004 (Section 9) http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/2004/act/44/section/9/enacted/en/html sets out the current legislative basis for the setting of speed limits.

What is the purpose of this public consultation?

Dublin City Council is to seek public feedback for the introduction of proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19) which include the expansion of 30km/hr in all roads of the city, except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws.

What is the public being asked to do?

We are requesting the public to inform this consultation process as to their preference to see the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19) being adopted or not.  Should these Bye-Laws be adopted, that will initiate the rollout of 30km/hr speed limit in all roads of the city, except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws, as identified on the following map.

In addition, we request members of the public within Dublin City Council’s area, to indicate their comments in relation to the further review of speed limits on all roads and streets in the Dublin City Council area which will inform future proposals for managing speed limits, for example; additional 30km/hr zones.

What is the benefit of lower speed limits, particularly in residential areas and around schools?

Dublin City Council is constantly working for and with the people of Dublin to improve road safety on all streets of the City. Therefore, traffic speed reduction for all vehicles plays a crucial role in improving road safety on City streets.

Speed is a major contributory factor to road deaths in the Republic of Ireland. Over 40% of fatal collisions are caused by excessive or inappropriate speed. Between 1997 and 2012, excessive speed contributed to 21% of our road deaths. This is equivalent to 1,162 lives (source: RSA).

Speed has been identified as a key risk factor in road traffic injuries, influencing both the risk of a road crash as well as the severity of the injuries that result from crashes

A 5km/h difference in speed could be the difference between life and death for a vulnerable road user like a pedestrian.

  • Hit by a car at 60km/h, 9 out of 10 pedestrians will be killed
  • Hit by a car at 50km/h, 5 out of 10 pedestrians will be killed
  • Hit by a car at 30km/h, 1 out of 10 pedestrians will be killed

Figure 1: Illustration from the Road Safety Authority showing the impact of vehicle speeds on pedestrian fatalities.

In order to protect the larger numbers of pedestrians, cyclists and vulnerable road users moving around in these areas and on the road carriageway. The introduction of  30km/h speed limit in all roads of the city except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws will make the city safer for more people to walk and cycle and will also assist in making the city a safer place for everyone.

Where are the 30km/hr speed limits in Dublin at present?

Dublin City Council has progressively introduced a 30km/h speed limit to many areas of the city. The implementation of special speed limits is being undertaken by the ‘Guidelines for Setting & Managing Speed Limits in Ireland’ (March 2015), published by the Department of Transport Tourism & Sport.

While road safety is important to all road users, cyclists and pedestrians are amongst those who are the most at risk of sustaining injuries in accidents. The extent and severity of injuries are linked to vehicle speed. The higher the speed, the more serious injuries are sustained. Therefore, traffic speed reduction for all vehicles plays a crucial role in improving road safety on the City Streets.

In response to this, Dublin City Council took a proactive approach and implemented 30km/h speed limits for all residential areas of Dublin. Most recent Dublin City Council’s Bye-Laws were adopted at the January 2020 Council meeting.

Please see the following map showing the existing 30 km/h implemented in Dublin City to date and the adopted by Council proposed expansion of 30 km/h as part of the Phase 4 Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020.)

NOTE: The installation of signage’s of the phase 4 part B and part C has been postponed until the outcome of this proposal for phase 5 Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19)

Do the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19) affect the arterial roads in and out of Dublin City Centre?

Yes. As part of the proposed (Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19)), it is proposed that the majority of the arterial routes that have a default speed limit of 50km/hr will be reduced to 30 km/h in order to protect pedestrians cyclist and vulnerable users of the road (except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws).

With COVID19, Dublin City Council is on the way to achieve one of it’s corporate high level goals where pedestrians and cyclists have the priority. Road Safety Section message is that we want to make people to understand that Dublin City urban fabric has changed and people’s perception of city mobility has changed with it. Therefore, the priority is now for people who walk, cycle and use public transport.

As part of Phase 5, all roads and streets are subject to review in this Public Consultation and should members of the public wish to submit their feedback in relation to the current speed limits on arterial roads, then this is a time for it.

Why not all the arterial roads were made 30 km/h?

The Road safety section reviewed all the roads in Dublin City, and as a result, the roads mentioned in the appendix, due to their geometry or existing characteristics didn’t qualify for the reduction to 30 km/h in this speed limit review. These roads can be considered for speed reduction in the future. It is important that speed limits are set in a realistic way and that they can be enforced efficiently and effectively.

Where can I have access to the info on the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19)/and where can I submit my representation?

The proposals can be viewed on Dublin City Council’s website www.dublincity.ie/speedreview

Details and drawings for this proposal Phase 5 Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19) are available for inspection from 2nd July 2020 to 13th August 2020 at:

  • The public counter in the Civic Offices, Wood Quay, Dublin 8;
  • Dublin City Council libraries;
  • Dublin City Council Area Offices.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, please contact your nearest opened library or Area Office for more instructions before visiting the premises. Please make yourself familiar with these proposals and let us know your views.

Submissions may be made online, on or before 5pm on Thursday 13th August 2020. Submissions can also be made in writing marked “Speed Limit Review” to the Senior Engineer, Transport Operations, Environment & Transportation Department, Dublin City Council, Civic Offices, Wood Quay, D08 RF3F, or via email to speedreview@dublincity.ie

If the Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws are adopted, when will the rollout of the expanded 30km/hr happen?

On completion of this Public Consultation, we will present a report on its outcome to the Elected Members for their consideration (expected September 2020). Should the Special Speed Limits be adopted, the Transportation Department of Dublin City Council will begin the installation of the required infrastructure for the erection of the speed signs. This process is expecting to be completed by the end of 2020.

Is there any additional Road Safety measures being progressed to compliment the proposed bye-laws?

To complement the proposed bye-laws the following measures are proposed:

PR Campaign

A strong media/social media campaign will be on all platforms of Dublin City Council and will encourage all the citizens to increase the level of compliance with the 30km/h speed limit.

The ultimate goal of DCC for this strategy is to try to influence changing people’s behaviour on how to share the road with all road users (behind the wheel/cycling/walking) and people’s perception about mobility around the city where pedestrians and cyclists have a priority.

Road Safety Strategy

Dublin City Council is working on the updating the Road Safety Strategy. This will supersede our current Road Safety Plan and its associated actions.  This will include various initiatives and actions to highlight and further inform the public of the importance of road safety. Also this review of speed limits is being carried out in close consultation with An Garda Siochána to ensure their input into our proposals and their assistance in informing the public of any changes to the speed limits.

Capital Works Contract

Each year the Transportation Department of Dublin City Council implements their Capital Works Contract (engineering solutions). This contract is to introduce various traffic infrastructures to improve the safety of our roads and streets.  These works may include; additional street signage, revised parking layouts, tightening the corners at junctions or installing speed ramps.

 

How will we monitor the affects of the proposed bye-laws should they be introduced?

Dublin City Council will carry out speed surveys in some of the areas included in the proposed please add the file as a link (Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws 2020 (COVID19)).  Should the Bye-Laws be adopted by the Elected Members, Dublin City Council will carry out a "before and after" analysis, an evaluation of areas where the speed limits have been changed. The results of our monitoring and evaluation will inform our annual investments in our annual Capital Works Contract.

How do the proposed Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws become Law?

The Road Traffic Act 2004 (Section 9) provides the legislative basis for speed limits, providing for the application of default speed limits in respect of various road types.  Default speed limits can only be changed by making Special Speed Limit Bye-Laws. The power to do so is vested in the Elected Members of Local Authorities.

On completion of this Public Consultation, the Transportation Department of Dublin City Council will present a report on its outcome to the Elected Members for their consideration and decision to adopt the Bye-Laws or otherwise. We expect to have the report with the Elected Members for their consideration in September of this year.

Why are submissions from the public important?

This Public Consultation is a statutory process.  Importantly, it provides Dublin City Council with the perspective and experiences of the public.  It is critical and right to engage in a meaningful way with the Public to understand your opinion on the speed limits and associated matters in your area.

If 30km/hr speed limits are to be introduced in all roads of the city (except roads specifically listed in the bye-laws), it is crucial to our decision making process that there is community support for a change in speed limits. The overriding principle that must inform any decision to change a default speed limit should be Road Safety.  In addition, to be effective, a speed limit should be self-regulating (self-explaining) and regarded as appropriate by road users and should not be imposed on a road unless there is a clear justification for doing so.

Where can get more information on road safety and the impact of lower speed limits?

What other countries or cities are introducing 30km/hr speed limits or the equivalent?

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