Moore Street

Moore Street is one of the best known outdoor markets in Dublin. It is famous for its meat, fish, fruit and vegetable stalls as well as the Dublin wit of its traders. No. 16 Moore Street was the last headquarters of the 1916 Rising, and it was here that the leaders held their last meeting before they surrendered.

This video is designed as a resource for primary and post-primary students up to Junior Certificate.

Moore Street

One of the best known outdoor markets in Dublin is in Moore Street. It is famous for its meat, fish, fruit and vegetable stalls as well as the Dublin wit of its traders, which means they might say something smart to you that will make you laugh.

The street takes its name from Henry Moore. The Moore family came to Ireland in the sixteenth century. They became owners of the land around St Mary’s Abbey, which was located off what is now Capel Street, and the surrounding area. In the eighteenth century they decided to divide their land by building streets through it.

Now Henry Moore, who was the Earl of Drogheda, felt he was an important man and he called four of these streets after himself: Moore Street, Henry Street, Earl Street and Drogheda Street. Drogheda Street was called Sackville Street later on and then became our O’Connell Street.

In the nineteenth century Moore Street became famous for its victuallers, poultry shops and butchers. A victualler is an old word for a grocery shop. Soon the number of fruit and vegetable stalls increased and Moore Street became the largest market in Dublin.

One of the people who lived in Moore Street at the beginning of the twentieth century was Seamus Scully. His father had a butcher shop at no 31 and Seamus describes what life was like growing up there. He says he could hear his father bargaining with the women over the price of pig’s cheek, backbones and ribs etc.

No. 16 Moore Street was the last headquarters of the 1916 Rising. The surviving leaders held their last meeting there before they surrendered.

There were many other markets around Moore Street: the Rotunda Market, Taaffe’s Market, the Norfolk Market, and Anglesea Market, which was famous for second-hand clothes, shoes and furniture. In 1972 all these markets were removed and the ILAC Centre was built in their place.

Moore Street still exists and thrives. Lately many people who have come from abroad to live in Ireland have started businesses in Moore Street and sell their types of foods there.

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