The Red Stables

The red stables in St Anne's Park were built in 1885 by Arthur Edward Guinness, Lord Ardilaun. The stables now house an arts and crafts centre with room for artists, a gallery and a café. Every Saturday there is a food and crafts market in the courtyard.

This video is designed as a resource for primary and post-primary students up to Junior Certificate.

The Red Stables, Clontarf

Have you ever been to the playground in St Anne’s Park? If you have, you probably passed by some beautiful red buildings near the entrance of St Anne’s Park off Mount Prospect Avenue in Clontarf. These are the Red Stables. They got their name from the red brick they were made from.

The stables were built in 1885 by Arthur Edward Guinness. He was the great-grandson of the first Arthur Guinness who had started the Guinness brewery and had been given the title Lord Ardilaun.

Lord Ardilaun had inherited the large part of land between Raheny and Clontarf which is now called St Anne’s Park in 1868. Over the following decades, he bought more land in the area and added a number of buildings including the new stables. The Red Stables were designed by George Ashlin who also built All Saints’ Church at the northern edge of the park.

The stables were built around three sides of a courtyard, had two storeys and contained stables for Lord Ardilaun’s horses, sheds for his coaches as well as hay lofts and living quarters for the grooms.

In 1939, Dublin Corporation bought the land and the Parks Department used the stables to store equipment until 2006 when the building was beautifully restored by Dublin City Council. It now houses an arts and crafts centre with room for artists, a gallery and a café. Every Saturday there is a food and crafts market in the courtyard.

Add new comment

Feedback