The Irish Volunteer Monument, Phibsboro'

The Irish Volunteer Monument in Phibsboro' commemorates members of the Dublin Brigade of the Irish Volunteers who fought and died during the Easter Rising (1916) and the War of Independence (1919-21). The monument depicts a soldier and below the soldier scenes from Irish mythology and ancient Irish history: the arrival of the Milesians (the first inhabitants of Ireland), Cuchulainn fighting at the ford and the death of King Brian Boru at Clontarf in 1014.

This video is designed as a resource for primary and post-primary students up to Junior Certificate.

The Irish Volunteer Monument, Phibsboro'

Across the road from Phibsboro' Library, Blackquire Bridge, North Circular Road stands a monument with a soldier prepared for battle. He represents those members of the Dublin Brigade of the Irish Volunteers who fought and died during the Easter Rising (1916) and the War of Independence (1919–21).

The limestone monument was made by Leo Broe (1899–1966) who himself had been a member of the Volunteers. It was unveiled on 19 February 1939 and over three thousand people attended.

Beneath the soldier are scenes from Irish mythology and ancient Irish history: the arrival of the Milesians (the first inhabitants of Ireland), Cuchulainn fighting at the ford, and the death of King Brian Boru at Clontarf in 1014.

The monument was vandalised in the 1970s and the soldier’s rifle was taken. It was fully restored by Dublin City Council in 1991.

Comments

My grandfather was a member of C Co. 1st battalion Dublin Brigade during the war of independence. He actually posed as the model for the monument, so there is a direct link between the monument and those who actually fought in the war. His name was Feilim (Felix) Gallagher, although for some reason he also used an alias at the time - Peadar Meehan. He was interned in Ballykinlar Concentration Camp towards the end of the war and later fought on the anti treaty side during the Civil War.

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