archives

Marx, Engels and Ireland Historian In Residence Blog

Karl MarxAs the world commemorates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Karl Marx, it may come as some surprise to hear that both Marx and Fredrich Engels, authors of The Communist Manifesto and creators of modern-day Marxist thought, were both strong proponents of Irish independence. In November 1867 Marx wrote that what Ireland really required was ‘Self-government and independence from England, an agrarian revolution and protective tariffs against England’.

Anna Manahan and The Rose Tattoo

Anna Manahan PortraitIn advance of the Irish Theatre Archive moving to its new home in the planned new City Library at Parnell Square Cultural Quarter, Dublin City Archives are focusing on cataloguing their backlog of theatre collections. I began working as the theatre archivist in July of this year and the first collection I tackled was the Anna Manahan Papers. One of the most interesting incidents in her career was her performance of the lead role in the Irish premiere of The Rose Tattoo in 1957. The run proved to be a historic moment for Irish theatre and in Anna’s words sent her career “rocketing”.

The German Arms Plot 1918 and the Mansion House Meeting, 1918

On Friday 17 May 1918 the British government ordered the arrest and imprisonment of all leading members of Sinn Fein. They claimed they were involved in a plan to import arms from Germany. Among those arrested were Countess Markievicz, Eamon de Valera, Arthur Griffith and W.T. Cosgrave. They were quickly removed from Dublin and lodged in prisons across Wales and England. The arrests did dislocate Sinn Fein’s organisation but did not paralyse it; for example, Michael Collins was one of those who avoided capture.

Woolen Mill on North Great Clarence Street

Woollen Mill, Clarence StreetRecently, I was asked if I knew anything about the woolen mill on North Great Clarence Street. I had to admit that I had never heard of one but immediately resolved to find out more about it. The premises in question (No. 46) now houses the D-Lightg Studios, described on their website as ‘a creative, multi-functional space housed in a converted woolen mill’.

 

Mellows Bridge Historian In Residence Blog

Child at Mellows BridgeMellows bridge, situated towards the Heuston Station end of the quays, sits on the site of one of the oldest bridges in Dublin city. The original was built in 1688, was named Arran bridge and it collapsed in 1763. Its replacement, completed in 1768, was known as the Queen’s Bridge and has been renovated several times since. In the post-independence rush to rebrand structures with imperial connections, the Dublin Municipal Council renamed the bridge after Queen Maeve of Connacht in 1922.

Political Cartoons (1885-1894)

The following political cartoons come from the United Ireland and the Weekly Freeman and the National Press, Irish nationalist newspapers that commented on the last few decades of nineteenth-century Ireland. These cartoons illustrate Irish nationalist sentiments at the time by commenting on political events and figures, in particular the Home Rule Movement, the Land War, and the 1892 General Election.

"Doing their Bit": Irish Women and the First World War

Irish SuffragettesThis fab exhibition, on display in Charleville Mall Library from 1 July  to 10 August, tells a multitude of Irish women’s stories during the First World War from Voluntary Aid Detachment nurses to munitions workers, home front volunteers, anti-enlistment activists and separation women. It draws on the archival records of the Royal Dublin Fusilers Association Archive and is curated by Dublin City Library and Archive and funded by Dublin City Council Decade of Commemoration.

Lord Mayor’s Certificate in Local Studies, 2018 - 2019

PosterThe Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies will be offered at Dublin City Library and Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street, D2 on Tuesday evenings from September 2018 until April 2019.

The course consists of 100 hours part time and will equip participants with skills in researching local history and in the preparation of a dissertation. The closing date for course applications is 5.00 p.m. on Friday 24 August 2018.

Father O'Flanagan's Suppressed Speech 1918

SpeechThis flyer is an extract from a speech given by Fr. Michael O’Flanagan to 10,000 people at Ballyjamesduff, Co. Cavan on Sunday May 26, 1918. O’Flanagan mentions the arrest of De Valera, the suppression of Arthur Griffith’s newspaper, and the ‘poison-gas of lies’ spun by ‘the Little Welsh spider’ (Prime Minister David Lloyd George) against the Irish people in the ‘German Plot’.

Kate Middleton Curtis

Kate Middleton CurtisIt is fitting on International Nurses Day 2018 to remember one of the most notable figures in Irish nursing before and during the First World War. Katherine Elizabeth Middleton Curtis was born in London in 1860 and married to the noted Engineer and Merchant William Charles Middleton Curtis. Moving to Ireland, she became a member of the Blackrock Nursing Division of the St John Ambulance Brigade in Dublin and was a regular contributor to the Irish Times on nursing and medical matters. Always an innovator, Kate was involved in various public initiatives to raise public awareness of hygiene and health; she ran first aid courses for women from 1911 and was also involved in Kingstown ‘Health Week’, held in April 1913. Kate was one of the best-known members of St John Ambulance and noted in her diary on 20 October 1914 that she was also ‘the oldest ambulance lady in Ireland.’

Feedback