archives

Dublin City Treasurer's Account Book (1540-1613)

GrotesqueOn 16 November 1538, the Monastery and lands of All Hallows were surrendered by Prior Walter Handcocke to Henry VIII as part of the Dissolution of the Monasteries.  The house and lands of All Hallows were granted by the king to the Mayor, Bailiffs, Commons and Citizens of Dublin on 4 February 1539. The lands included properties in counties Dublin, Meath, Kildare, Louth, Tipperary, Kilkenny and elsewhere.  The grant of All Hallows more than doubled the city’s land-bank and led to a reorganization of the Dublin City Treasurer’s office to cope with the increased revenue from leases of All Hallows land.  This, the earliest known City Treasurer’s Account Book begins in 1540 largely as a way of ensuring that all moneys from letting this land bank were accounted for.

Image: Grotesque, City Treasurer's Account Book. Dublin City Library & Archive MR/35 (1540-1613)

Exploring Georgian Dublin

Charlemont HouseThe Georgian period was an important era in the development of Dublin city. Beginning in 1714 with the coronation of King George I and ending with the the death of King George IV in 1830, it has left a lasting impression on the landscape of the city. We immediately think of the Georgian architecture of Mountjoy Square, Merrion Square, Fitzwilliam Square and Henrietta Street and of great architects such as James Gandon, Edward Lovett Pearce and William Chambers.

During Heritage Week 2016 we are celebrating this influential era with a free full day seminar, 'Living in Georgian Dublin', which will explore a wide range of topics including the architecture, shops, street paving and the politics of the period. Speakers include Harold Clarke, Liz D'Arcy, Dr Patricia McCarthy, Dr Finnian O'Cionnaith, Dr Sarah Foster, Dr. Diarmuid O Grada and William Cumming.

Image: Charlemont House, Rutland Square. Engraving from the Dublin Penny Journal. View larger image

Battle of the Somme: 100th Anniversary

Somme photograph1 July 2016 marks the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme which lasted until November 1916.  Over a million soldiers from both sides were killed during the carnage, which included over 3,500 Irish soldiers fighting for the Allies in World War 1.

Image:  Detail from DCLA/RDFA1.09.047A, photo of soldiers marching across war-torn area of the trenches & battlefield. Caption: "War 1914-15-16... in the Somme French Offensive Relieving the trenches at Dompierre" (see larger image).

The Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association Archive held at Dublin City Library and Archive, includes the personal papers of various Irish soldiers who experienced the Battle of the Somme and all of its horrors. An exhibition based on these resources will be launched in our Dublin Room exhibition space in October 2016.  Here's a sample of some of the remarkable stories that can be researched at Dublin City Library and Archive:

Book Launch: Dublin Civic Portrait Collection

Dublin Civic PortraitOn Tuesday 14 June, at 7.00pm, 'The Dublin Civic Portrait Collection: patronage, politics and patriotism, 1603–2013' by Dublin City Archivist Dr. Mary Clark will be launched in the Oak Room of Dublin's Mansion House. Lord Mayor of Dublin Críona Ní Dhálaigh will officially launch the book and Professor Christine Casey, Department of the History of Art & Architecture, Trinity College Dublin will be a guest speaker.

Please join us to celebrate the publication of this unique and momentous book. Booking required in order to attend, please email info@fourcourtspress.ie.

9th June 2016 marks International Archives Day #IAD2016

Charter of Henry IIThe celebration is a global opportunity for archivists to connect with colleagues, donors, users, volunteers, partners and decision makers as well as the public at large. Archive services around the world will be tweeting using #iad2016 on International Archives Day, and we thought we would join in the fun at our twitter handle @dclareadingroom.

Image: Charter of Henry II 1171/72, the earliest Norman document in Ireland

Dublin City Archives has been providing an archive service to the city of Dublin since 1980 and has a acquired a huge number of archival treasures dating from 1171. The records relate to civic administration, theatre, archaeology, business, sport, landed estates, oral history and much more.  Researchers are welcome to delve into our collections at Dublin City Library and Archive Reading Room under the watchful eye of Nelson’s Head. For those who won’t have an opportunity to visit us in person, we have created a slide show of some of our more unusual items:

North Strand Bombing, 75th Anniversary

Damaged buildingOn the eve of the 75th Anniversary of the North Strand Bombings, a set of files relating to compensation claims for property that was damaged or destroyed by the bombings  have been catalogued by Dublin City Archives and  can now be accessed by members of the public for the first time in our Reading Room.

The North Strand Bombing occurred on the night of 30/31 May 1941, when four bombs were dropped over the North Strand area by German aircraft. The impact of the bombing was strongly felt in the city of Dublin as it resulted in the death of 28 people, injured over 90 and caused the destruction of 300 houses.

Elizabeth O’Farrell and the 1916 Proclamation

1916 ProclamationDublin City Council holds an original 1916 Proclamation which belonged to Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell and was kindly donated by her family.  This Proclamation has been conserved and is now on display in The Story of the Capital exhibition at City Hall. To commemorate the family’s generosity, Dublin City Council held a seminar in the Council Chamber at City Hall on Monday 25 April 2016. We've recorded all three talks so you can listen back here if you missed this special event commemorating one of Ireland's most important documents and a truly remarkable woman.

WSC Map Conservation Project 2016

Heritage Council LogoDublin City Archives is delighted to announce that we have received a €4,000 grant from the Heritage Council of Ireland under the Heritage Management Project Scheme 2016 to conserve 23 Wide Street Commission Maps.

The maps date from the eighteenth century and document the work of the Wide Street Commissioners in moulding the development of Georgian Dublin. It includes maps relating to Sackville street (present day O’Connell street), College Green, and Dame street. The maps are historically significant, not only from a local and national perspective, but also because they reflect the European Age of Enlightenment and the Commissioners constant attempts to improve the city by the rational application of scientific and aesthetic principals.

Kevin Street Library Collection (1899-1995)

Kevin Street LibraryThe archives of Kevin Street Library were accessioned by Dublin City Library and Archive in 2012. It is an important collection for exploring the history of Dublin Public Libraries, Cumann na Leabharlann, and also includes materials relating to the 1916 Rising and the Emergency Period in Ireland. The collection has recently been catalogued, with part-funding provided by Dublin City Council Decade of Commemoration Fund.  The Kevin Street Library archives can now be accessed by members of the public in the Reading Room of Dublin City Library and Archive.

Dear Friends and Fellow-Sailors, an introductory blog from Nelson's Head

Nelson's PillarDear Friends and Fellow-Sailors

I have recently been celebrating my 10th anniversary in Dublin City Library and Archive, where I have very comfortable quarters. I have a stout plinth for my head and a view across the Reading Room – it’s my job to keep my one good eye on the students – who are all very hardworking - maybe thanks to my supervision! They tell me I’m a valued member of staff and they couldn’t do without me – good to know I’m still so useful as I’m 207 years old.

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