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Séamus Ennis HIR Blog

Historians in ResidenceThis year marks the centenary of the birth of Séamus Ennis, the renowned musician, singer, folklorist and broadcaster who left behind, to quote from one obituary, “a priceless heritage of Irish tradition to the nation”. Inspired by on-going centenary events taking place across Dublin and at the Séamus Ennis Arts Centre, this blog briefly examines Ennis’s final years and death.

Womens National Health Association HIR Blog

Monica's BabyclubThis photograph (larger image below) from the Dublin City Library and Archive shows groups of women with their babies and young children outside St Monica’s Babies Club in St. Augustine Street, close to John’s Lane Church in the heart of Dublin’s Liberties.  This club, - one of about 170 set up throughout Ireland - opened in 1909 and aimed to educate mothers in the overall care of their infants by holding classes and appropriate lecture series on the premises.

Dora Maguire Historian In Residence Blog

Black and White portrait of DoraThis week I have had the great pleasure of visiting Massachusetts and presenting a paper at the annual national meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies held in Boston. It was my second time attending such a gathering, having also presented a paper on Dublin poet Maeve Cavanagh MacDowell two years ago, when ACIS met in Kansas City, Missouri. This time around I spoke about the life of Dora Maguire, another woman who happened to be profiled in R. M. Fox’s 1935 book of essays Rebel Irishwomen.

Collinstown Aerodrome Raid 1919

Old Photo of Dublin AirportThe Soloheadbeg Ambush in January 1919 did not lead to a wide scale conflict immediately. For much of 1919, the Irish Volunteers embarked on a mainly defensive campaign, primarily searching for arms. As a result, some skirmishes broke out leading to some deaths.

Grangegorman HIR Blog

Henrietta Entrance Kings InnLast month I was in the King’s Inns building for the launch of a remarkable short film. Trish McAdams directed and wrote Confinement for the Grangegorman Development Agency, who asked her to create a public art project. The film’s 30-minute running time evokes three hundred years of the history of the King’s Inns, Henrietta Street and the Grangegorman Asylum. The story is told through the imagined voice of Tony Rudenko, an artist who lived in Henrietta Street until his death in 2014, who was also a friend of the director.

New Titles For March

Magic of FictionNew books at Dublin City Public Libraries this month. There's a grand aul stretch in the evenings and the sun is beginning to show more of  itself every day. We're celebrating the arrival of Spring with some fabulous new books.

A Look Back in Books 2018

Staff Picks logoA selection of staff favourites from 2018.

One of the great things about working in a library is seeing all the wonderful new books as they arrive in. It probably won’t surprise you to hear that we do love our books in Dublin City Public Libraries, and so we’ve drawn together a selection of titles that we enjoyed in 2018. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did.

Hoonuit

Hoonuit LogoThe online resource we are looking at this week is Hoonuit  is a web-based repository of online, on demand, technology tutorials. It offers unlimited library member access to video-based software training on hundreds of common software applications and devices, including Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite, Google Docs, and iPad.

History Document of the Month: Rally round the banner boys!

Banner Boys FlyerGerald Crofts (1888–1934) was one of a small group of musicians and lyricists who made a huge contribution to the Irish independence movement in the early 20th century. He came from Capel Street originally, where his family had a shop and he was a popular singer. His brother Joseph was a composer who arranged the words and music for this marching song, which was dedicated to Crofts.

National Shell Factory

Shell FactoryThe National Shell Factory in Parkgate Street  was set up during the First World War following lobbying by various business and engineering interests, who came together in 1915 to form the Dublin Armaments Committee. The site of the factory was chosen by Captain Fairbairn Dowie, who had been seconded from the London Scottish Regiment to take charge of the operation. The factory had been a woolen mill prior to the war.

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