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Internship at Dublin City Libraries and Archives

My internship in the web department at Dublin City Libraries started on Monday the 18th of June 2018 and ended on Friday the 24th of August 2018. This means that by the end of this period I will have spent 10 weeks working in the web unit. I was appointed three different tasks: create twitter content, write guides and reports on Google and Twitter analytics and to work on the Jacob’s Biscuit Factory project.
#thingstodoinDUBLINwhenyoureDEAD

Access the Ireland Collection Online

JSOR logoThe Ireland Collection is an interdisciplinary collection of journals and other materials. The Collection contains titles and resources across the arts, humanities, and sciences, in disciplines such as music, art, history, literature, archaeology, mathematics, and biology. Materials span from the 1780s to the present.

May Public Holiday Arrangements

Cherry blossomDublin City Public Libraries will be closed from Saturday 5 May to Monday 7 May 2018 (inclusive).   Branch libraries will re-open on Tuesday 8 May 2018.

Access eResources 24/7

Don't forget you can access our collection of eBooks, eAudiobooks, digital magazines, comics, graphic novels and databases over the May public holiday: www.dublincity.ie/library-eresources

Plus explore Dublin's history through our digital repository with its vast collection of old photos, maps and ephemera.

Online Renewals<--break->

Dubliners by James Joyce

DublinersDubliners is Joyce at his most direct and his most accessible. Any reader may pick it up and enjoy these fifteen stories about the lives, loves, small triumphs and great failures of its ordinary citizens without the trepidation that might be felt on opening, say, Ulysses, famed for its impenetrability and stream-of-consciousness hyperbole. At the same time, although simply written, there is great depth and many levels to the stories, in which the characters – young, middle-aged and old – are revealed, to themselves, or sometimes only to the reader, in all their frail humanity.

Yeats in Translation

Swedish translationThe Dublin City Library's Collection of W.B. Yeats's books holds about 200 translations which I have gathered together during my work on a new bibliography of his writings

W.B. Yeats's works have been translated into and published in dozens of languages, four dozen plus one and a couple of dialects at my present count, and maybe more we don't know about. The alphabetical list looks impressive -

Ireland's Harp: shaping a nation's identity

Irish HarpMary Louise O’Donnell gave a talk and recital titled "Ireland's Harp: shaping a nation's identity" in the Central Library, Ilac Centre on 12 March. Her talk traces the history and evolution of this treasured national emblem and glorious musical tradition. You can listen to a recording of the event below or download to listen to offline.

The image of the harp – symbolic of the political and cultural landscape of Ireland for centuries – evokes strong sentiments in the collective Irish imagination. This iconic instrument became the emblem on Irish coinage in the sixteenth century. Since then it has been symbolic of Irish culture, music, and politics – finally evolving into a significant marker of national identity in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

The funerals of W. B. Yeats, 1939 and 1948

WB YeatsWilliam Butler Yeats (1865-1939), poet and dramatist, senator of the Irish Free State, Nobel Prize laureate, founder of the Abbey Theatre and guiding light of the Irish literary revival, died at Rocquebrune, in the hills above Monaco, in the South of France on 28 January 1939. Yeats was a delicate child, and as an adult he suffered from a series of complaints; on medical advice his spent many of his winters in Italy and the South of France from 1927 onwards. In the winter of 1938 he left Ireland for the Riviera as his health was failing, and his death occurred the following January. His funeral and burial took place at Rocquebrune.

Muc from Twigín visits Cabra Library!

MucMuch to our delight, Muc the pig visited Cabra Library on the 9th June with the RTÉjr crew to do some filming! If you didn't already know (shame on you!), Muc is one of the characters in the TV programme 'Twigín'.

Muc took great delight in paging through some of our picture books (hoping we expect to see himself in one. Those film stars!). No mucking about there!

Solar-Powered Lego at Coolock Library!

Coolock lego eventIn Coolock Library recently children from a local school learned how to produce solar-powered electric cars using lego! The photo slideshow below will give you some idea as to the fun that was had, not to mind the knowledge acquired!

They were taking part in a Renewable Energy Lego Workshop involving Codema and Learnit that is also taking place in our branch libraries in Ballymun, Cabra and Raheny this June for invited classes.

Elsie's Letter - Extracts

Elsie McDermidOn Wednesday, 27th May last, Dublin City Council’s Public Library Service took possession of a copy of a rare eye-witness account of the outbreak of the 1916 Easter Rising. The account was in the form of a letter written by Elsie McDermid, a popular opera singer of the era, to her mother in England on the occasion of Elsie's visit to Dublin. She was in Dublin to perform in Gilbert and Sullivan Shows at Dublin’s Gaiety Theatre with the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company. However, the performances were cancelled as a result of the dramatic outbreak of the Easter Rising on Monday 24th April 1916. Elsie wrote the 26-page letter and in it she relates, among other things, the digging of trenches in St. Stephen’s Green and eye-witness accounts of the first casualties on the streets of Dublin.

Here are some extracts from Elsie's letter:

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