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Dublin Pubs

Brazen Head“Good puzzle would be cross Dublin without passing a pub”
      James Joyce, Ulysses

This gallery consists of images of Public Houses from the Dublin City Photographic Collection. Some of these pubs are still open for business but most have vanished from our streets. It is hoped that these images will serve as ‘memory triggers’ for those Dubliners who frequented them, passed them by, or avoided them.

Vanishing Dublin

Wood QuayView the 'Vanishing Dublin' Image Gallery Collection. Fifteen images displayed per page. When there, click on first image to start slideshow of images on page, then select pages 2,3, etc., and do same. Options with slideshow: pause, view image details, download original. Selecting text link beneath thumbnail in gallery links to image details. Many of the image details pages contain Google street view image of location beneath photograph for comparison with today.

'For Dublin keeps on changing, 
And nothing stays the same…' 
Pete St John, Dublin in the Rare Oul Times

Treasures from the Collections

W.B. Yeats poemThe Special Collections of Dublin City Public Libraries contains a wealth of rare and beautiful material spanning centuries of Dublin’s history. The collections encompass a wide range of material; from the first Dublin newspapers to hand-tinted maps, from 18th century manuscripts to early editions of the works of Jonathan Swift, from propaganda leaflets of the Civil War period to exquisite examples of the craft of Dublin bookbinders. Highlights include a unique Yeats collection and the complete library of the historian John T. Gilbert.

Capital Letters

The Happy PrinceAs a city, Dublin has always punched well above its weight in terms of the number and quality of the writers it has produced. Its literary heritage is world famous and was recognised in 2010 when it was awarded the status of City of Literature by UNESCO. It has also always had more than its fair share of enthusiastic and sometimes critical readers, a group which has been well served by the public library service of Dublin since its foundation in the late 19th century.

Dublin Bombings of 1974

Welcome Inn, Parnell StreetThis collection of 148 images of the aftermath of the Dublin bombings of May 1974 provides a valuable source of information on the tragedy. The material is of particular relevance to second-level students studying Northern Irish history and provides the basis for original research.

On the evening of May 17th 1974 Dublin city centre was rocked by three explosions. The first, at 5.28 pm, was in Parnell Street and resulted in the death of eleven people. The second explosion, which took place almost immediately after the first, was in Talbot Street. This blast killed fourteen people. The third explosion, in South Leinster Street, which occurred just after 5.30 pm, was responsible for the death of two more.

Just before 7.00pm that evening, there was a further explosion in Monaghan Town in which seven people were killed.

Pembroke Library Re-Opens

Pembroke LibraryPembroke Branch Library re-opened after extensive refurbishment on Monday August 16th 2010!

Following the completion of improvement works, Dublin City Public Libraries were pleased to announce new and improved services at Pembroke Library, providing welcome ease of access for all. Improvements include:

Celebrating Dublin as the European Capital of Sport 2010

Carruth and McCulloughDublin City was awarded the title of European Capital of Sport 2010 by the European Capital of Sports Association (ACES). In recognition of this honour, Dublin City Public Libraries present a small selection of photos from the Dublin City Council Photographic Collection celebrating the proud sporting heritage of Dublin.

View Sports' Images from the Dublin City Council Photographic Collection.

2010 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award Shortlist and Winner

The TwinThe 2010 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award judging panel chose 8 titles to be shortlisted for the 2010 Award. These were selected from a (very) longlist of 156 novels, nominated by libraries all over the world. 

The shortlisted titles were

North Strand Bombing 1941

NSB06 North Strand RoadOn the night of 31 May 1941, four high-explosive bombs were dropped by German aircraft on the North Strand area of Dublin City. The casualties were many: 28 dead and 90 injured, with 300 houses damaged or destroyed. Charleville Mall Public Library was designated as the headquarters for the bombed area and City Architect Horace O’Rourke was in charge of the clearance project.

Search and Browse the North Strand Bombing Photographic Collection online.

Dublin City Library and Archive houses a collection of 57 photographs illustrating the aftermath of the North Strand Bombing, May 1941.

Treasures of the Irish Language: Some early examples from Dublin City Public Libraries

first book by the Franciscan Archbishop of Tuam, founder of St Anthony’s College, LouvainThe first book printed in the Irish language did not appear until 1571, over one hundred years after Gutenberg’s invention. The earliest works printed in Irish and using the Irish typeface were religious works commissioned by Queen Elizabeth I which aimed to convert Irish speakers to the reformed church. The first book published using the type specially cut for the printing of Irish was Aibidil Gaeidheilge agus Caiticiosma, by John O’Kearney, printed in 1571.

View Treasures of the Irish Language Image Gallery

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