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Dermot Healy a new found Treasure.

 Dermot HealyThe first I heard of Dermot Healy was in June 2014. A friend of mine was asked to read through poems to be considered for selection in the Dermot Healy International Poetry Competition. The next day, it was reported on the national news that he had passed away. It had been remarked by another one of my of friends that his work never got the recognition and success it deserved, that he was a much more “interesting” writer than his peers. Interesting can sometimes mean, “you’re not going to understand this…. You thickie!”. I began reading Long Time, No See. Immediately, I got a jolt: the words on the page were formatted like poetry and none of the dialogue was in inverted commas.  I was reluctant to continue as my eyes and brain were in for a different exercise regime. However, my desire to be a know-it-all won through and I’m so glad I persevered.  This is one of the best books I have ever read. Set in an Irish coastal rural community,it starts slowly with a young man visiting his grand uncle.

Searching for Faces of the Past

Man taking part in 1961 Clean the Beach ActI am a student at Trinity College Dublin pursuing my Master’s degree in Public History and Cultural Heritage. I am currently working on a project which will bring both the past and present into focus. It will revitalize photographs of the past and place them into terms of modernity. The attached three images are of people I would like to learn more about and if possible, speak with in order to learn more about their lives, their personal history and memory, and the circumstances of when the photographs were taken. This project will eventually become part of an online image gallery and perhaps a newspaper article. 

Left: The photo was taken in 1961 as a part of Clean the Beach Act. (click to enlarge)

Meet Anne Enright: First Laureate for Irish Fiction

The Forgotten Waltz by Anne EnrightOn Thursday, 29 January, author Anne Enright was named the inaugural Laureate for Irish Fiction. The honour was presented at a ceremony at the Arts Council by Taoiseach Enda Kenny. 

As the Laureate, Enright will have a three-year term, during which she will teach creative writing  for one semester at University College Dublin and one at New York University, as well as participating in numerous public talks and appearances. In addition, as Laureate she will deliver an annual lecture which will be broadcasted, published, or both. These duties will be bestowed on the future Laureates as well.

The objective of the Laureate will be to encourage a stronger interaction with Irish literature, and the intention of these obligations and appearance is to bring the Laureate more into the public sphere. Each Laureate will also receive €150,000 for their three-year term.

Gilbert Lecture - Pictures

Kevin WhelanThe 18th annual Sir John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture, 'Dublin as a global city: through time and space' was given by Kevin Whelan, Director, Keough-Naughton Institute, Notre Dame Centre in Dublin at the Dublin City Library & Archive on Thursday 22 January at 6pm.

A slideshow of photographs from the event is posted below.

 

Special Dance Performance at Ballyfermot Library

A specially commissioned dance performance for 10-15 year olds took place in the Ballyfermot Library. See video below.

Video: Paul Daly

'H is for Hawk' is the 2014 Costa Book of the Year

H is for Hawk And the overall winner of the 2014 Costa Book Awards is... H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald! 

Winner of the 2014 Samuel Johnson Prize, "H is for Hawk is a record of a spiritual journey - an unflinchingly honest account of Macdonald's struggle with grief during the difficult process of the hawk's taming and her own untaming. At the same time, it's a kaleidoscopic biography of the brilliant and troubled novelist T. H. White, best known for The Once and Future King . It's a book about memory, nature and nation, and how it might be possible to try to reconcile death with life and love." (book description).

What the judges said: "A unique and beautiful book with a searing emotional honesty, and descriptive
language that is unparalleled in modern literature."

World Health Organization Collection. How far have we come?

World Health OrganisationThe Business Information Centre houses a repository of World Health Organization material known as the WHO Collection - there are 592 items here to date - a figure which is slowly growing. The WHO Collection dates back to 1980 and contains a large collection of books, pamphlets and magazines which they self publish.

More Crime Reads to Savour

Gone GirlIn recent months I have continued apace with my crime fiction reading, and here I share with you just some of those reads, they being books by Gillian Flynn, Donna Leon, Thomas Enger and Fred Vargas. So read on!

Who at this stage is not familiar to some degree with the story that is 'Gone Girl' 4.5 stars seeing how the film version was such a hit? Gillian Flynn's book, upon which the film is based, has proved a huge success, being the 25th bestselling adult fiction title of all time and spending 8 weeks at the top of the New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list. 'Gone Girl' is the classic tale of a wife going missing and the finger of suspicion regarding her disappearance pointing at her husband. Where is Amy Dunne, and has loving husband Nick got something to do with her disappearance?

Workshop worth attending!

The expert in anything was once a beginner The Business Information Centre are delighted to announce another gripping workshop aimed specifically at all those wishing to "find the job they always wanted in 2015". This event takes place on Tuesday, 27th January at 1.30pm in the Central Library, Ilac Shopping Centre, Dublin 1 and booking is recommended to avoid disappointment.

Please contact (01) 873 3996 to secure your place. Remember the one who hesitates is lost.

Danger, Danger READ All About It!

Bookcover:  Danger is Everywhere by David O'DohertyHave you ever wondered is your teacher a vampire or is your pet cat in fact a dangerous tiger? This spring we are inviting boys and girls in Dublin to become qualified ‘dangerologists’ by reading Danger is Everywhere by David O’Doherty as part of our Citywide Reading Campaign for Children. This fun handbook points out the dangers of everyday objects from your schoolbag and pet cat to the dangers of having a party or brushing your teeth.

This book has great illustrations by Chris Judge and will appeal to both girls and boys of mixed reading abilities. There will be an author and illustrator visit to public libraries as well as city-centre based events to promote this campaign. The final event of the campaign will take place as part of the St. Patrick’s Festival.

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