book awards

2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award Longlist

Irish books on longlistSeven Irish novels are among 147 titles that have been nominated by libraries worldwide for the International DUBLIN Literary Award.  Nominations include 43 novels in translation with works by 43 American, 23 British, 14 Canadian, 10 Australian, 5 New Zealander and 4 Dutch authors.

The 2017 Award was launched today, 21 November by Lord Mayor, Brendan Carr, Patron of the Award, who praised the International DUBLIN Literary Award for its promotion of excellence in world literature as well as for the opportunity to promote Irish writing internationally. “Like every year”, he said, “readers will find new books and new authors through the Award, and they can pit themselves against the international panel of judges and pick their own favourite novel, before I announce the winner on 21 June next year”.

Irish Book Awards 2016 winners announced

Book coversCongratulations to Mike McCormack, Marian Keyes, Graham Norton, Paul O'Connell, Paul Howard, Liz Nugent,Tana French and E.M. Reapy and all the winners of the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards.  We thinks these terrific books will prove popular winners, already having garnered interest and praise amongst DCPL readers and book clubs. Voting is open for the overall Irish Book of the Year award, so don't forget to vote for your favourite winning book on the award website!

Mike McCormack's Solar Bones has recently been awarded the Goldsmith Prize, which celebrates innovative fiction.  The Glass Shore edited by Sinéad Gleeson featuring short stories by Northern Irish women writers is sure to be delightful as The Long Gaze Back. It's great to see Stephen and David Flynn scoop the cookbook of the year, we salute their enthusiastic message to eat well and make food our medicine - even if we can't quite forgo the chocolate biscuits! And not forgetting the winning children's books: Dave Rudden's 'Knights of the Borrowed Dark' is the chosen book for the 2017 Citywide Reading Campaign for children and Kathleen Watkins' Pigín of Howth is full of warmth and fun. With Christmas just around the corner these books would make ideal presents for readers of all ages and tastes.   And of course all titles are available to borrow/reserve from your local library!

Irish Book Awards 2016 shortlists announced

Bord Gais shortlisted booksIt's that time of year again, when the eagerly awaited shortlists for the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards are announced. As you can see it has been a great year for Irish books. There is something for every taste across twelve adult categories and two children's categories, so that is a lot of reading inspiration! Voting is open for each category so don't forget to vote for your favourites on the award website!

The Irish Book Award categories and shortlisted titles are as follows (with links to our catalogue):-

Goldsmiths Prize 2016 Shortlist Announced

Goldsmiths PrizeThe shortlist for the 2016 Goldsmiths Prize has just been announced and includes Irish authors Mike McCormack and (previous winner) Eimear McBride, as well as Irish-Canadian Anakana Schofield. Indeed McCormack is the only male on the shortlist of six, testimony to the strength of contemporary women's writing.

Eimear McBride's shortlisted novel 'The Lesser Bohemians' is only her second book and tells the story of a young Irish woman who goes to drama school in London and of her intense relationship with an older man. Mike McCormack's 'Solar Bones' is set in the west of Ireland as the recession is about to strike and tells the story of one man's experience as his world falls apart. Anakana Schofield's 'Martin John' traces the lives of a sex offender and his mother as they try to keep him on the straight and narrow.

2016 Man Booker Shortlist

Man Booker Prize 2016There's a certain symmetry to the Man Booker Shortlist this year: three men, three women; two British, two Canadian and two US authors. However, this is where any similarity ends. As you will see, these six novels are set apart by distinct themes and subjects, including the relationship between mother and daughter, a murder in 19th century Scotland,  classical music in Revolutionary China and obsession and crime in 1960s Boston.  Amanda Foreman, chair of judges praised the shortlisted books, commenting that they, "reflect the centrality of the novel in modern culture – in its ability to champion the unconventional, to explore the unfamiliar, and to tackle difficult subjects." We have a couple of months to explore these fascinating themes and subjects - so let's get reading!

Here's the 2016 shortlist (with links to library catalogue):

The Rooney Prize Winner in its 40th Year is... Doireann Ní Ghríofa

ClaspBilingual poet Doireann Ní Ghríofa was this evening awarded the €10,000 Rooney Prize for Irish Literature. The prize is awarded annually to an emerging Irish writer under forty years of age for a body of work that the selection committee considers shows exceptional promise.

She was presented with the award at a special ceremony in Trinity College this evening.

Dublin Literary Award Winner Akhil Sharma Reading and Q&A

Akhil Sharma & Niall MacMonagleOn the evening of Friday, 10 June, literary award winner Akhil Sharma gave a reading, followed by a Q&A session, introduced and moderated by Niall MacMonagle,  in Dublin City Library & Archive, Pearse Street. Sharma was announced the winner of the 2016 International DUBLIN Literary Award for his novel Family Life at a ceremony in Dublin’s Mansion House on Thursday, 9th June 2016.

Transcript

Listen to the reading and interview [play time: 48:56 minutes]:

 

Literary Award Winner's Acceptance Speech

Akhil SharmaOn Thursday, 9 June 2016, in the Mansion House in Dublin, Family Life by Akhil Sharma was announced as the winner of the 21st International DUBLIN Literary Award. Akhil Sharma was born in Delhi, India, and moved with his family to the United States when he was eight. He is also the author of An Obedient Father, winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He lives in New York City and is an assistant professor of English at Rutgers University, Newark.

Commenting on his win, Akhil Sharma said: “To be acknowledged by people I respect is a strange thing. I can’t say I fooled them. I feel abashed by this honor.”  

Watch Akhil deliver his acceptance speech:

Lisa does it again! Desmond Elliott Prize Winner!

Lisa McInerneyLisa McInerney just can't stay out of the news! Having just recently won the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction with 'The Glorious Heresies', last evening the book was declared winner of the 2016 Desmond Elliott Prize. Two big accolades in the space of a fortnight! Our heartiest congratulations to Lisa.

The Glorious Heresies is Lisa's first novel. It is set in post-boom Cork and her protagonists inhabit the darker edge of society; Ryan, a 15 year old drug dealer and his alcoholic father, Georgie, a prostitute; and Maureen, whose son is a gangster, has just accidentally murdered someone.  McInerney's energetic comic style and her interesting characters lift the book from its setting and make for a colourful, fresh read.

Well Done Sarah Crossan, Carnegie Medal Winner!

One by Sarah CrossanMany congratulations to Irish young adult and children's author Sarah Crossan on winning the UK's premier children's book award, the CILIP Carnegie Medal 2016. One, her winning novel in verse form, is the original and sensitive story of 16 year old conjoined twins Grace and Tippi.

Congratulations must also go to illustrator Chris Riddell for winning the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2016 for his wonderful illustrations in 'The Sleeper and the Spindle', written by Neil Gaiman. This is his third win.

The winners were announced today, Monday 20th June.

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