book awards

International Dublin Literary Award 2017 Shortlist

2017 Award10 novels have been shortlisted for the 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award, proudly sponsored by Dublin City Council and managed by Dublin City Libraries. The list includes The Green Road by Irish author Anne Enright, debut novel Under the Udala Trees, and six novels in translation from Angola, Austria, Denmark/Norway, Mexico, Mozambique and Turkey, and novels from Nigeria, Vietnam and the USA.

The International DUBLIN Literary Award is worth €100,000 to the winner and is the world’s most valuable annual literary award for a single work of fiction published in English.
The award was launched on 7th April 1995 and is now in its 22nd year.

The shortlisted titles are:

Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist announced

The Lesser BohemiansCongratulations to Irish author Eimear McBride whose second novel The Lesser Bohemians has been longlisted for the Baileys Prize for Fiction.  The Lesser Bohemians is about Eily, a young drama student who moves from rural Ireland to London in the mid nineties, and relishes the freedom, new experiences and temptations of this new life.

The longlist also features literary legends Margaret Atwood and Annie Proulx, as well as some new names, debut novelists Ayobami Adebayo, Emma Flint and Fiona Melrose.  Authors on the longlist who have previously won the prize are Linda Grant (2000) Rose Tremain (2008) and Eimear McBride (2014).

Here's the full longlist with links to the library catalogue:

Sebastian Barry wins Costa Novel Award for the second time

Days Without EndWe're delighted to hear that Sebastian Barry's novel Days Without End has won the Costa Novel Award 2016. It's Barry's second time to win the award, his novel The Secret Scripture was awarded both the Costa Novel Award and the overall Costa Book of the Year 2008. A Long, Long Way (2005) was the book choice for Dublin: One City, One Book 2007.

Two other winners have Irish connections: Scottish writer Brian Conaghan now lives in Dublin and the subject of Keggie Carew's winning biography, Dadland is her Irish father Tom Carew.

The overall Costa Book of the Year, chosen from the category winners will be announced on 31 January.

2016 category winners with links to the library catalogue:

 

CWA Dagger Winners for 2016 Announced

CWA logoA little behind on this one, as the winners were announced in London on the 11th October last. But never too late to bring your attention to the books making the news and winning the accolades. Should you be wondering, the CWA (Crime Writers’ Association) Daggers, awarded annually, celebrate the best in crime and thriller writing.

DodgersProbably the standout winner this year is first-time American novelist Bill Beverly who has won the Crime Writers’ Association’s Gold Dagger for the best crime novel of the year as well as the John Creasey New Blood Dagger for the best debut crime novel. One award is good, two is better! Well done him.

The Diamond Dagger, which some might deem the Crime Writers' Association's highest honour, and awarded for "a career's outstanding contribution to crime fiction", was actually announced last January and went to Peter James. James has written 28 novels and sold over 18 million books worldwide, and is best known for his series of crime books featuring Detective Superintendent Roy Grace.

2016 Costa Book Award Shortlists Announced

Costa logoThe 2016 Costa Book Award shortlists have been announced, and included in the novel category are Irish authors and former winners Sebastian Barry and Maggie O’Farrell. Also good to note the presence on the first novel shortlist of Kit de Waal and on the children's shortlist you will find Dublin-based author Brian Conaghan. Congrats to all four, indeed to all twenty shortlisted authors!

The shortlisted 20 authors, four in each of five categories, were selected from a total of 596 entries.  Of the 20 authors, 14 are women, and included are a former competitive ice skater (Susan Beale - first novel category), a hip-hop singer (Kate Tempest - poetry category) and a pop journalist (Sylvia Patterson - biography category). Indeed the poetry shortlist is all female, the first such occasion this has occurred,

2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award Longlist

Irish books on longlistSeven Irish novels are among 147 titles that have been nominated by libraries worldwide for the International DUBLIN Literary Award.  Nominations include 43 novels in translation with works by 43 American, 23 British, 14 Canadian, 10 Australian, 5 New Zealander and 4 Dutch authors.

The 2017 Award was launched today, 21 November by Lord Mayor, Brendan Carr, Patron of the Award, who praised the International DUBLIN Literary Award for its promotion of excellence in world literature as well as for the opportunity to promote Irish writing internationally. “Like every year”, he said, “readers will find new books and new authors through the Award, and they can pit themselves against the international panel of judges and pick their own favourite novel, before I announce the winner on 21 June next year”.

Irish Book Awards 2016 winners announced

Book coversCongratulations to Mike McCormack, Marian Keyes, Graham Norton, Paul O'Connell, Paul Howard, Liz Nugent,Tana French and E.M. Reapy and all the winners of the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards.  We thinks these terrific books will prove popular winners, already having garnered interest and praise amongst DCPL readers and book clubs. Voting is open for the overall Irish Book of the Year award, so don't forget to vote for your favourite winning book on the award website!

Mike McCormack's Solar Bones has recently been awarded the Goldsmith Prize, which celebrates innovative fiction.  The Glass Shore edited by Sinéad Gleeson featuring short stories by Northern Irish women writers is sure to be delightful as The Long Gaze Back. It's great to see Stephen and David Flynn scoop the cookbook of the year, we salute their enthusiastic message to eat well and make food our medicine - even if we can't quite forgo the chocolate biscuits! And not forgetting the winning children's books: Dave Rudden's 'Knights of the Borrowed Dark' is the chosen book for the 2017 Citywide Reading Campaign for children and Kathleen Watkins' Pigín of Howth is full of warmth and fun. With Christmas just around the corner these books would make ideal presents for readers of all ages and tastes.   And of course all titles are available to borrow/reserve from your local library!

Irish Book Awards 2016 shortlists announced

Bord Gais shortlisted booksIt's that time of year again, when the eagerly awaited shortlists for the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards are announced. As you can see it has been a great year for Irish books. There is something for every taste across twelve adult categories and two children's categories, so that is a lot of reading inspiration! Voting is open for each category so don't forget to vote for your favourites on the award website!

The Irish Book Award categories and shortlisted titles are as follows (with links to our catalogue):-

Goldsmiths Prize 2016 Shortlist Announced

Goldsmiths PrizeThe shortlist for the 2016 Goldsmiths Prize has just been announced and includes Irish authors Mike McCormack and (previous winner) Eimear McBride, as well as Irish-Canadian Anakana Schofield. Indeed McCormack is the only male on the shortlist of six, testimony to the strength of contemporary women's writing.

Eimear McBride's shortlisted novel 'The Lesser Bohemians' is only her second book and tells the story of a young Irish woman who goes to drama school in London and of her intense relationship with an older man. Mike McCormack's 'Solar Bones' is set in the west of Ireland as the recession is about to strike and tells the story of one man's experience as his world falls apart. Anakana Schofield's 'Martin John' traces the lives of a sex offender and his mother as they try to keep him on the straight and narrow.

2016 Man Booker Shortlist

Man Booker Prize 2016There's a certain symmetry to the Man Booker Shortlist this year: three men, three women; two British, two Canadian and two US authors. However, this is where any similarity ends. As you will see, these six novels are set apart by distinct themes and subjects, including the relationship between mother and daughter, a murder in 19th century Scotland,  classical music in Revolutionary China and obsession and crime in 1960s Boston.  Amanda Foreman, chair of judges praised the shortlisted books, commenting that they, "reflect the centrality of the novel in modern culture – in its ability to champion the unconventional, to explore the unfamiliar, and to tackle difficult subjects." We have a couple of months to explore these fascinating themes and subjects - so let's get reading!

Here's the 2016 shortlist (with links to library catalogue):

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