children's books

The Children's Book of the Year Shortlist is Announced!

GroundedEight titles have been shortlisted for the 24th CBI Book of the Year Awards. The shortlist was announced on Tuesday, 18th March, and includes such big name authors as Eoin Colfer, Derek Landy and last year's winner, Sheena Wilkinson, to name just three. The award winners will be announced on the 13th May.

Right: 'Grounded' by Sheena Wilkinson, the 2013 Overall Winner.

Now in their 24th year, the awards are made annually by Children’s Books Ireland to authors and illustrators born or resident in Ireland and are open to books written in Irish or English and published in the previous year. The CBI Awards are the only annual Children's Book Awards in Ireland.

The shortlisted titles (with links to the library catalogue) are:

Carnegie And Kate Greenaway Medals Longlists Announced

CILIP Carnegi Greenway MedalToday, (Tuesday 4th February), the longlists for both the CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals are revealed.

New for Children this Christmas!

PosterLest we should forget our younger borrowers this Christmas (Joking! However could we!!), here are just some of the new books and DVDs we have in our branch libraries in readiness for Christmas. Or anytime in fact!

Browse the list of DVD and book titles below, each of which links to its respective catalogue record where you can get further details and check on availability.

Junior Book Club Choices 2013

Roddy Doyle, Roald Dahl and Anne Fine are popular authors among our Junior Book Clubs.

Old favourites such as The Secret GardenThe Hobbit and The Diary of Anne Frank are still going strong.

The most popular books were Roald Dahl's The Magic Finger; Roddy Doyle's Greyhound of a Girl and Wilderness; Louis Sachar's Holes and There's a Boy in the Girl's Bathroom; and Andy Stanton's Mr Gum and the Cherry Tree

Search the library catalogue to check availability or reserve any of these books.

Bookcover The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett Bookcover: A Greyhound of a Girl by Roddy Doyle Bookcover: There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom by Louis Sachar Bookcover: Mr Gum and the Cherry Tree by David Tazzyman 

CILIP Carnegie Greenaway Shortlist Announced Today!

CILIP Carnegie AwardThe CILIP Carnegie Medal and Kate Greenway Medal shortlists for 2013 have just been announced and the former includes award winning Irish writer of both adult and children's books, Roddy Doyle. 

The Carnegie Medal, awarded annually, was established in 1936 in memory of the Scottish-born philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835 - 1919). Carnegie set up more than 2,800 libraries across the English speaking world. The Award is the oldest accolade for children's writing in the UK.

The Carnegie Medal shortlist is as follows (with links to library catalogue where title is in stock):

Dublin's Reading The Nightmare Club: We Dare You to Join!

This is a city-wide children's reading promotion in conjunction with UNESCO City of Literature, Dublin City Public Libraries and Little Island publishers and takes place from mid- January to mid-March 2013. We are asking children all over Dublin to join Annie Graves’ Nightmare Club by reading the short scary stories in the Nightmare Club series.

Nightmare Club. Image: Jason Clarke
Image: Jason Clarke

Brilliant Mid-term Reads from Book Festival Authors

Children's Book Festival PosterDark days, and even darker nights - autumn is the perfect time to curl up with a good book. You might already have a toppling pile of books beside the bed, or sitting on a bookshelf just waiting for you to pick them up and bring the story to life by opening that first page. But if you are finished everything interesting in your 'to read' pile and are looking for a good book to keep you company over this mid-term break, perhaps you will find inspiration in the work of some of the authors who have been visiting Dublin City Libraries during October for Children's Book Festival. Some, like Judi Curtin are very well-known and don't need any introduction from me, while others, like Michael Carroll, who writes science fiction / fantasy novels, are less well-known, but equally engaging writers.

If you were lucky enough to be at Cabra Library or Drumcondra Library to meet popular author Judi Curtin, you will have heard all about how she started writing and how moving schools often as a child helped her become observant and made sure she always had good stories to tell. Judi's most recent book is 'Leave it to Eva' the third book in the 'Eva' series. There are seven books in Judi's earlier 'Alice and Megan' series, as well as a cookbook, so no need to run out of your favourite reads.

do1thing Read a Book

The Unfirgotten CoatThe do1thing campaign encourages us to read a book about the refugee experience. One of the best children's (or adult's) books on the subject is 'The Unforgotten Coat' by Frank Cottrell Boyce. I wrote a story here on the blog on a previous occasion highlighting the UNHCR do1thing campaign, which again this year is taking place in libraries across the country, starting June 18th. 

'The Unforgotten Coat' is available in every branch library in Dublin City - check the link for availability - or call in to your local library - it's a brilliant read! As promised in my previous story, Frank Cottrell Boyce did indeed visit Dublin last October as part of the Children's Book Festival 2011.

'A Monster Calls' - double award winning book that everyone should read.

It's being billed as 'an historic moment in children's literature', as Patrick Ness wins the CILIP Carnegie Medal for his novel 'A Monster Calls' (Walker Books). Patrick also won last year for 'Monsters of Men' the third book in his 'Chaos Walking' trilogy (a feat only achieved once before by Peter Dickinson in 1979/80). Uniquely, 'A Monster Calls' has also been awarded the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal for illustration - the prize going to Jim Kay for his haunting illustrations that perfectly match the mood and subject of the novel.

Book Cover and Author Photograph L.- R. Patrick Ness & Jim Kay  book cover and illustrator photograph

As a huge fan of this book myself, I set my Book Club to reading it some months ago. They are an open-minded group and accepted my recommendation of this 'children's book' with good grace. Any expectations they had harboured of an 'easy read' were soon abandoned as they became engrossed in this challenging and emotionally mature exploration of grief, bereavement, fear and the consolations of family relationships that are 'good enough'. The overall verdict from our Book Club? - 'Everyone should read this book.' Seems like the CILIP judging panel agreed.

Let the Wild Rumpus Start!

Where the Wild Things areMy daughter texted me yesterday...'Maurice Sendak died!'. If she had been at home we would probably have re-read Sendak's classic 'Where the Wild Things Are' and acted out a 'Wild Rumpus' for old times sake. She might even have donned a variation of a wolf suit (as a child she dressed for half a year as Robin Hood and another half a year as Batman, so she has form). Instead, we made do with watching YouTube clips and following #wildrumpus on Twitter.

Feedback