creative writing

Writer in Residence Position Available!

PenDublin City Council invites applications for a Writer in Residence, as part of its Culture and Creativity Plan under the Creative Ireland programme.  The residency runs for the period October 2017 to September 2018 and will be managed by the City's Library Service through the Director of Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, and will be supported in kind by Irish Writers Centre.

The residency is open to published writers working in any genre of fiction for adults and attracts a fee of €10,000 per annum.

Feeling the itch to get writing?

Dublin in the Coming TimesBookings are now being taken for a series of Creative Writing Workshops in Rathmines Library. The sessions will be held at 6.00pm on the 8, 15 and 22 May, courtesy of the Dublin in the Coming Times initiative. We are hoping to form a regular creative writing group from those attending the workshops, so if you have ever felt the yen to get your thoughts down on paper or start that novel that has been brewing inside for years, why not come along?

Dermot Healy a new found Treasure.

 Dermot HealyThe first I heard of Dermot Healy was in June 2014. A friend of mine was asked to read through poems to be considered for selection in the Dermot Healy International Poetry Competition. The next day, it was reported on the national news that he had passed away. It had been remarked by another one of my of friends that his work never got the recognition and success it deserved, that he was a much more “interesting” writer than his peers. Interesting can sometimes mean, “you’re not going to understand this…. You thickie!”. I began reading Long Time, No See. Immediately, I got a jolt: the words on the page were formatted like poetry and none of the dialogue was in inverted commas.  I was reluctant to continue as my eyes and brain were in for a different exercise regime. However, my desire to be a know-it-all won through and I’m so glad I persevered.  This is one of the best books I have ever read. Set in an Irish coastal rural community,it starts slowly with a young man visiting his grand uncle.

Rathmines Library Short Story Competition Winners

In conjunction with ‘Rathmines Roar’ Community Information Day, 17th May, Rathmines library invited children to write a short story about their favourite book and to dress up as a character from the book. The winners were presented with their prizes at Rathmines library on Friday 30th May.

View a slideshow of the competition winners and runners up.

Creative Writing in Dublin City Public Libraries

Cabra Library Creative Writers' Group

'In other towns, clever people go out and make money. In Dublin, clever people go home and write their books.' Anne Enright 

Dublin is a city that is famed for its poets, writers and storytellers - it is a city of literature after all.  In Dublin City Public Libraries members of writers' groups meet informally to talk about their writings, improve their skills, and to offer encouragement to one another, facilitated by Orla Ní hAonigh.

Pictured rightMembers of Cabra Library Creative Writers' Group

Like to write? Want to try? Fiction, poetry, it matters not. A little ambition can go a long way!  Meeting times may vary so phone or email in advance if interested in participating in a Writers' Group.

Brian Cushen reading The Chat Show Host

The Chat Show Host

by Brian Cushen

Mario de Salvador was compeering a talk show on the local TV station.  It was a live show with an audience, something similar to any talk show.  The show went on air late at night (clapping).  This particular night he had a mixture of talent on the show.  He had a singer, a dancer, a comedian and an artist.

Kathleen Clifford reading The Boogie Man

The Boogie Man

by Kathleen Clifford

James Connolly reading 'A day in the life of Jimmy Joyce'

My name is James Connolly. I write about a fella called Jimmy Joyce.

A day in the life of Jimmy Joyce

by James Connolly

Joe Donnellan reading Match Day

My name is Joe Donnellan. I’m writing this piece about match day All Ireland this year. It’s written from a neutral point of view even though I’m from Mayo. This is the piece:

Match Day: All Ireland Football Final, 2013

by Joe Donnellan

Francis Lawlor reading The Budget

The Budget

by Francis Lawlor

The problem with any budget is that everyone cannot be satisfied. Following the madness of the Celtic Tiger years, 1994 to 2008, and the collapse of the economy in September 2008, it follows that under the subversion of the bailout and the presence of the Troika every budget that followed since 2008 would mean that there would be more losers than winners, and Budget 2013 was no exception.

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