Dublin Remembers 1916

Dolphins Barn: Creative Digital Animation Series

Creative Digital Animation title In April and May of 2017 Dolphin's Barn Library hosted a series of workshops where young historians learned how to combine research, storytelling, drawing and digital animation to tell a tale from Irish history.

Expert facilitators included historian Conor Kostick and author and illustrator Alan Nolan.

The result is this exciting video set in Dublin 1920. In it Tadhg undertakes a dangerous mission to deliver a message to Countess Markievicz. On the way he evades policemen, befriends Victoria Jacobs and is shot at by the 'Black and Tans'!

The project was supported by the UNESCO City of Literature office.

John O’Grady (1889 - 1916) & the Jacob’s Garrison

John O'GradyJohn O'Grady was a member of A Company, 3rd Battalion, Dublin Brigade of the Irish Volunteers. He was the only volunteer from the Jacob's Factory Garrison killed in action during the 1916 Rising.

Last year we were honoured to welcome Dermot Hogan, a relative of John O'Grady to our Reading Room, and he kindly showed us some of the 1916 memorabilia carefully preserved by the family for over 100 years. Pictured below is the 1916 medal awarded to John by the President of Ireland. The 1916 Medal is awarded to persons with recognised military service during the 1916 Rising. The medal is bronze and it depicts the death scene of Cú Chulainn, surrounded by a circle of flames. The reverse is inscribed "Seachtain na Cásca 1916 John O'Grady".

2016, the Centenary Year - A Look Back

BannerWhat a memorable year it has been! It being the centenary of the 1916 Rising, Dublin City Council has been proud to support and enable the Ireland 2016 state programme of formal commemorative events that took place in Dublin during this past year. The "Dublin Remembers 1916-2016: Is Cuimhin Linn programme" programme presented a series of lectures, talks by expert historians, exhibitions and conferences in Dublin libraries, City Hall, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane and other venues in the city throughout the year.

Remembering our history

Chambers AwardAt the Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Awards last night Dublin City Council won the “Commemorations and Centenaries 2016” award for its Dublin Remembers 1916-2016: Is Cuimhin Linn programme. Dublin City Public Libraries staff were delighted to accept the reward on behalf of all sections and colleagues in Dublin City Council who made the centenary year of the 1916 Rising in the capital such a memorable one. Within Dublin City Council the Commemorations Committee, the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, the Arts Office, Richmond Barracks, Events, Planning, the Heritage Office, City Hall, Community and Social Development, Environment and Transport, Parks, Dublin Fire Brigade all contributed to this extraordinary and award-winning project.

1916: How will you remember?

Banners"Dublin Remembers 1916" has been an extensive series of lectures, talks by expert historians, exhibitions and conferences in Dublin libraries, City Hall, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane and other venues in the city throughout 2016.

A range of history-based activities and initiatives were delivered, designed to deepen and broaden our understanding of the events of 1916 and that pivotal period in our history.

There were a number of formal commemorative events, focused on remembering and honouring those who took part in the Easter Rising, and especially those who gave their lives.

1916: How will you remember? from Dublin City Public Libraries on Vimeo.

Dublin Time

Time Ireland ActOn 1 October 1916, just five months after the Rising, Ireland relinquished its individual time zone and adopted Greenwich Mean Time. With the introduction of daylight saving and the end of summertime that year Dublin’s time was aligned to that of London.

Right: Time (Ireland) Act 1916 (click to view larger image)

For 36 years Ireland’s time was set on the longitude of Dunsink Observatory, and was 25 minutes 21 seconds later than Greenwich. This had implications for trade and commerce, as well as communications and travel. Up to the late 19th century time was not standardised and each area set its own clocks. The Time Act of 1880 established Greenwich Mean Time for Great Britain and Dublin Mean Time for Ireland.

Remembering 1916 - Easter Weekend, a Look Back

SmithfieldThousands took to the streets on a glorious Easter Monday in March to remember the 1916 Rising. Dublin City Council was in Smithfield Square with library staff and the Dublin Fire Brigade. We unveiled the Learning Bus with its retro-fit Edwardian parlour, author Lia Mills was on hand to promote “Fallen” the One City One Book choice for 2016 and we were serenaded by the Drum and Pipe band from the Dublin Fire Brigade. Re-enactors from both sides, 1916 Rising rebels and First World War troops, joined us to talk to people about their uniforms and kit.

Watch the wonderful video below. And look out for one of the library staff acting the part of a newsboy!

The Kevin Street Librarian and the Rising

James O'ByrneFormally named as Byrne (the family later changed their surname to O'Byrne, a practice not uncommon at that time), James O'Byrne was from Lower Mayor Street in Dublin's North Wall area.

Young James was recruited to the city libraries as a 'boy' library assistant in 1913 and from that time was assigned to the Charleville Mall, North Strand library.  He was 20 years old by Easter Week 1916.

Image: James O’Byrne, AKA James Byrne (1896 to 1947)

As he didn’t provide a witness statement to the Bureau of Military History owing to his untimely death in 1947, details of O'Byrne's Easter week activities are sparse. He was attached to the second Battalion, 'F' Company of the Irish Volunteers Dublin Brigade, a small company which was under the command of Captain Frank Henderson and 1st Lieutenant Oscar Traynor.  O’Byrne attended Fr Matthew Park in Fairview on Thursday evenings for drilling and on Sundays for rifle practice.  In Easter week, he was engaged in combat across a number of sites - at Fairview, the Metropole Hotel, Eason's, the GPO, Moore Street and Henry Place. After the surrender, he was arrested and interned first in Knutsford and later Frongoch Prison from where he was released in July 1916.

1916 Diaries

Fitzpatrick diary pg1During the Easter Rising of 1916 many Dublin residents, caught in the middle of the fighting, recorded their experiences in diaries and journals. Herbert Victor Fleming and Nora Marion Fitzpatrick were among those to do so. Fleming, a store manager, and Fitzpatrick, a V.A.D. nurse, were both loyal to England and regarded the Sinn Féin Rebels as traitors and the enemy. Their vivid descriptions of destruction and survival remain captured in their diaries for generations to come.

Image: Page 1 of Nora Marion Fitzpatrick's 1916 Diary

Herbert Fleming’s Diary excerpt:
"All the roads covered with dead and dying horses and wounded people... I then tried to get home but cannot. The bridges into the city held by Rebels."

The Clontarf Town Hall Caretaker and the Rising

Michael McGinnA native of Omagh, Co. Tyrone, ‘Mick’ McGinn was an ‘old’ Fenian who had been a Tyrone IRB leader since the 1870s and had spent a lot of his life in British jails.  McGinn was a close personal friend of Thomas Clarke, who was seven years his junior.  Indeed, Clarke had joined the Tyrone IRB in 1878 at the request of both leading Fenian John Daly and Michael McGinn. By the late 1890s McGinn was the Fenian Head Centre for Co. Tyrone, based at Dergmoney House in Omagh. 

Image: Michael McGinn 1851-1916, from a photograph of the O'Donovan Rossa Funeral Committee 1915.

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