history (podcasts)

The Irish Revolution 1917-1923 - Brian Hanley

The Irish RevolutionWhat happened in Ireland after the 1916 Rising? How did the political, economic and social landscape change and what brought about independence in 1922? Listen back to a three-part lecture series delivered by Brian Hanley Dublin City Council’s Historians-in-Residence for Dublin City Library & Archive.  The lecture topics are:

  • Lecture 1- Ireland in 1917
  • Lecture 2 - What was the War of Independence?
  • Lecture 3 - What was the Civil War?

The IRA in the Twilight Years

IRA, June 1932Listen back to Dr Brian Hanley discussing the IRA and Nazi Germany during the 1930s and 1940s.  Brian details the growth of the IRA during this era, looks at key IRA figures, and cites examples of conflict with 1932 Fianna Fáil government, the Blue Shirts and the Gardaí.  He discusses IRA contact with Germany in the hope of gaining support and arms to attack Britain. Brian also looks at how an escalating campaign of IRA violence led to politicians fearing it would cause problems for Irish neutrality during the Emergency. 

Brian Hanley is a historian and author. He has written widely on Irish republicanism and radicalism, including The IRA: A documentary history, 1916-2005, The IRA, 1926-36 and (with Scott Millar The Lost Revolution: the Story of the Official IRA and the Workers Party. He is currently Historian in Residence at Dublin City Library and Archives, 2017. His areas of expertise include society, politics and culture of 19th and 20th century Ireland, on the Irish Revolution and Civil War, on the IRA from 1923-2005.

Dublin and the Great War 1914-18

Dublin & WW1Listen back to a series of three talks on the topic of Dublin and the Great War hosted by Near FM in Coolock Library this April. The talks looked at a range of subjects including women in war time, anti-war agitation, the influence of the Russian Revolution and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and includes songs from the era performed by An Góilín Singers.

In the first talk, Near FM's Ciarán Murrary talks to Pádraig Yeates about the influence of the Russian Revolution and to John Dorney about anti-war agitation in Dublin, socialists, pacifists and republicans. Fergus Russell from An Góilín sings songs from the era. Recorded at Coolock Library on 5 April 2017.

Messines Peace Park: Its contribution to Irish-British reconciliation

speakers & organisersDublin City Library and Archive and The Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association presented a seminar titled 'Messines Peace Park: Its contribution to Irish-British reconciliation' on Friday 19 May at The Council Chamber, City Hall, Dame Street. Many thanks to all speakers, Bertie Ahern, Barabara Walshe, Dr Chris McGimpsey, Dr Alasdair McDonnell and Tom Burke and to the Lord Mayor of Dublin Brendan Carr, who formally opened the seminar. Thank-you to Paddy Harte Junior who read Peace Pledge to formally close the seminar.

About The Messines Peace Park

Messines Peace ParkThe Island of Ireland Peace Park, more usually known as the Messines Peace Park, is a memorial to the soldiers on the island of Ireland who died, were wounded or went missing during World War I. It is located close to site of the June 1917 battle for The Wijtschate -Messines Ridge. The project was initiated by A Journey of Reconciliation Trust, a broadbased cross-border Irish organization which hopes to bring together people of diverse beliefs. The Trust comprised representatives of the main churches in Ireland, with professional and political representatives together with community leaders from both parts of Ireland under the leadership of Paddy Harte and Glenn Barr.

The 20th John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture

Rocque King St(Podcast) 'Gentlemen’s Daughters in Dublin Cloisters: The social world of nuns in early 18th century Dublin', the 20th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Dr Bernadette Cunningham, Royal Irish Academy at the Dublin City Library and Archive on Wednesday, 25 January 2017.

The lecture looks at the social world of the communities of Poor Clare and Dominican nuns who established themselves in the Oxmantown/Grangegorman area of Dublin in the early eighteenth century.

Conserving Wide Street Commission Maps 1757-1849

WSC MapListen to Liz D’Arcy talk about conserving the Wide Street Commission Maps. Hear how she painstakingly removed sellotape, cleaned, repaired and strengthened these important maps.   Liz D'Arcy, Paperworks, Studio for Paper Conservation is qualified with an MA in Conservation of Fine Art on Paper. Liz is an accredited member of the 'Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic works in Ireland' (I.C.H.A.W.I) and a member of the 'Irish Professional Conservators and Restorers Association' (I.P.C.R.A).

Between 1757- 1851, the Wide Street Commission had a major impact on the development of the city, transforming it from a medieval city to the Dublin we know today.  Its function was to provide “Wide and Convenient Streets” for Dublin and it had extensive powers to acquire property by compulsory purchase, develop new streets, demolish buildings and impose design standards on building lots which were sold to developers. Dublin City Archives hold the Wide Street Commission Archives, which comprises maps, minute books and drawings. www.dublincityarchives.ie

Restoring a Georgian Dublin Residence

No. 19 North Great George's StreetListen to Harold Clarke's charming account of restoring the beautiful Georgian building, no. 19 North Great George's Street.  When Harold first viewed the house it was suffering from 180 years of dereliction but he recognised its beauty and bought it just three days later.

In this illustrated talk, Harold outlines the challenges he faced during his faithful restoration of the house, its long history,  and the delightful features he uncovered, most particularly its beautiful decorative plasterwork. The before and after photographs offer a fascinating insight into this most successful restoration process. I'm sure you will agree the results are splendid, from the beauty of the friezes and plasterwork in the drawing room and dining room, to the library room with its ceiling painted in the Dublin colours, the 100 stepped staircase, the entrance hall and the garden room.

O'Connell Street...the story of the street and its buildings

O'Connell StreetIn this podcast, architects Klaus Unger and Stephen Kane present a history of Dublin City's main thoroughfare, O'Connell Street, formerly named Sackville Street. Hear about the unique design features of some of its famous landmark buildings and the stories behind them.  Klaus and Stephen outline the origins of O'Connell Street area as it evolved from the tangle of medieval Dublin, before discussing the influence of the Wide Street Commission, Lord Gardiner, and renowned architects Edward Lovett Pearce, Richard Cassels, Gandon and Francis Johnston (Nelson's Pillar).

Working on the Railway in Dublin, 1900-1925

Rail car engravingIn the early years of the 20th century, the Great Southern and Western Railway was the largest railway system in Ireland and it was a significant employer in Dublin.  In this talk, Mary Muldowney looks at aspects of the lives of Dubliners who worked for the GS&WR, from the turn of the century to its reinvention by the Dáil in 1925.  Mary looks at working conditions, pay, pension and industrial action, focusing especially on the lives of those who were engaged at the lower levels of the pay scales, men and women who were completely dependent on the railways.  At a time of political, economic and social upheaval jobs on railway were highly prized, as they were relatively stable and often came with accommodation.

May and James's Love Letters during the Rising

Letters - May & James by Tessa FinnWhen May Finn died after 50 years of widowhood, her family found a hidden trove of more than 90 love letters carefully tied in ribbons.  They had been written in 1916 as she and her fiancé approached their wedding day that June. Great historic changes were playing out in Ireland at the same time. Their world was being “changed utterly” but did they really understand it?

Listen to Tessa Finn, talk about and read from the extraordinary exchange of love letters between her grandparents which took place during the turbulent year of the Rising.  The letters provide an intimate glimpse into the lives of two people growing in love, not involved in the conflict but touched by it in many ways.

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