history (podcasts)

Ireland and The Russian Revolutions (Podcast)

Russian RevolutionLast October Dublin City Archives marked the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 with a series of lunchtime talks at Dublin City Hall. The talks curated by Francis Devine examined Ireland's political and cultural reaction to the Revolution.  Here you can listen back to two talks from the series. In the first, Donal Fallon examines witness statements from the Bureau of Military History, contemporary newspapers and ephemera to ascertain what the revolution meant to the Irish Left, the Trade Union movement, Sinn Féin and asks who were the Irish Bolsheviks? Then you can listen back to Dr Brian Hanley as he considers how initial support for the Russian Revolution changed to violent opposition to Communism in Ireland.

Organised by Dublin City Library & Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street Dublin 2. Courtesy of History.com

The 21st John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture

Michael Griffin(Podcast) 'Live from the Conniving House: Poetry and Music in Eighteenth-Century Dublin' the 21st Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Dr Michael Griffin, University of Limerick at the Dublin City Library and Archive on Wednesday, 24 January 2018.

The Conniving House tavern, long since forgotten, opened in 1725. On the water not far from where Sandymount Green is now, it is the cultural and geographical starting point for this lecture on the lively interaction of poetic and musical cultures in eighteenth-century Dublin. The only verbal account that we have of that venue comes from Life of John Buncle, esq. by Thomas Amory, who heard there the famous Larry Grogan playing the pipes while Jack Lattin, ‘the most agreeable of companions’, played matchlessly on the fiddle. Other writers of the period, such as Laurence Whyte and Charles Coffey, recorded an energetic native musical culture. This lecture explores a fascinating moment in the history of Dublin’s poetical and musical cultures, one which yields several compelling instances of cross-cultural connivance.

Podcast: William Spence Engineering Works Cork Street

William SpenceIn this podcast ‘William Spence: A Victorian engineer in the right place at the right time’, Cathy Scuffil, Dublin City Council Historian in Residence, looks at the history of William Spence Engineering Works Cork Street. 

The Cork Street Foundry and Engineering Works of William Spence and Son was established in Dublin in 1856.  It continued trading over two generations of the Spence family, with no small measure of success until 1930.  The company was situated on a large, circa 3 acre industrial site located at 105 -109 Cork Street, Dublin, on a site that, until the early 1850s, had housed the tanning and currier business of a James O’Neill, who also had a residence at 26 Cork Street.

The People, places and historical buildings of Dublin 7

Dublin 7Listen back to local Historian and well-known author Bernard Neary from Cabra West as he brings us on an interesting tour of Dublin 7, including the people, places and buildings of interest. Find out where the writer Iris Murdoch was born, where the poet Austin Clarke grew up and where Matt Kiernan made his Uilleann Pipes.  Discover interesting facts about local landmarks including the Royal Canal, Broadstone Railway Station and The Four Courts. Reminisce about skipping and conkers games played by children and the picturehouses that dotted the area.

Bernard’s new book Dublin 7, published by The Lilliput Press, is available to borrow from your local library and at bookshops.

Walking the Royal Canal

Foster AquaductListen back to a talk by Peter Clarke looking at the 225 year history of the Royal Canal, from its origins in 1789 through all its phases to the present day. The talk traces the planning and construction of the canal and will reference many places, people and events of historical interest along the course of Dublin’s beloved Royal Canal.

Image: Foster Aqueduct and Royal Canal House Phibsboro (see larger image)

Reserve a copy of Walking the Royal Canal by Peter Clarke from the library catalogue.

Recorded at Phibsboro Library on Monday 21 August 2017 as part of Heritage Week 2017.

The Irish Revolution 1917-1923 - Maeve Casserly

The Irish RevolutionWhat happened in Ireland after the 1916 Rising? How did the political, economic and social landscape change and what brought about independence in 1922? Listen back to a three-part lecture series delivered by Maeve Casserly Dublin City Council’s Historians-in-Residence for the South East Area.  The lecture topics are:

  • Lecture 1 - Ireland in 1917
  • Lecture 2 - What was the War of Independence?
  • Lecture 3 - What was the Civil War?

Listen back to Dublin Festival of History 2016

Dublin Festival of HistoryHighlights from the Dublin Festival of History 2016 recorded live at Printworks Venue, Dublin Castle and at Dublin City Public Libraries featuring talks by Saul David, Roger Moorhouse, Alex Von Tunzelmann and many more Irish and International historians. The centenary of the 1916 Rising was marked with talks looking at key figures of the Rising and a panel discussion on how 1916 was commemorated. Other topics covered include Stalin's personal library, the Suez crisis, the First World War and the campaign for truth behind Hillsborough.

Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council and is managed by Dublin City Public Libraries.

Don't forget Dublin Festival of History 2017 with over 90 free events in Dublin Castle, libraries and other venues begins this Friday, 29 September.

Living in Victorian Dublin

GPODublin City Hall was the venue for our third Heritage Week event, our seminar ‘Living in Victorian Dublin’. This is the second in our annual series, the first was ‘Living in Georgian Dublin’ in 2016 and the next will be ‘Living in Restoration Dublin’ in 2018.  Our five speakers each spoke on a different topic, in order to cover all aspects of the Victorian city.  Michael Barry was our first speaker.  Author of Victorian Dublin Revealed he gave an overview of the entire city, demonstrating how many buildings, both public and domestic, have remained from that era and introducing them through his own splendid photography. 

The Irish Revolution 1917-1923 - Brian Hanley

The Irish RevolutionWhat happened in Ireland after the 1916 Rising? How did the political, economic and social landscape change and what brought about independence in 1922? Listen back to a three-part lecture series delivered by Brian Hanley Dublin City Council’s Historians-in-Residence for Dublin City Library & Archive.  The lecture topics are:

  • Lecture 1- Ireland in 1917
  • Lecture 2 - What was the War of Independence?
  • Lecture 3 - What was the Civil War?

The IRA in the Twilight Years

IRA, June 1932Listen back to Dr Brian Hanley discussing the IRA and Nazi Germany during the 1930s and 1940s.  Brian details the growth of the IRA during this era, looks at key IRA figures, and cites examples of conflict with 1932 Fianna Fáil government, the Blue Shirts and the Gardaí.  He discusses IRA contact with Germany in the hope of gaining support and arms to attack Britain. Brian also looks at how an escalating campaign of IRA violence led to politicians fearing it would cause problems for Irish neutrality during the Emergency. 

Brian Hanley is a historian and author. He has written widely on Irish republicanism and radicalism, including The IRA: A documentary history, 1916-2005, The IRA, 1926-36 and (with Scott Millar The Lost Revolution: the Story of the Official IRA and the Workers Party. He is currently Historian in Residence at Dublin City Library and Archives, 2017. His areas of expertise include society, politics and culture of 19th and 20th century Ireland, on the Irish Revolution and Civil War, on the IRA from 1923-2005.

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