Irish fiction

Irish Writers of the Fantastic celebrated in new poster

Charles MaturinDublin UNESCO City of Literature have produced a new poster in association with Swan River Press, to celebrate the work of twelve Irish writers of fantasy, from Charles Maturin to Mervyn Wall. Ask in your local Dublin City library branch for a free copy!

Check www.dublincityofliterature.ie for more suggested novels, collections and short stories by the featured writers.

These are the twelve writers, with links to the library catalogue:

Charles Maturin

Charles Robert Maturin, novelist and playwright, was born in Fitzwilliam Street on 25 September 1782. In his youth he had a fascination for the gothic novels of Walpole, Radcliffe, and “Monk” Lewis. His early novel, The Milesian Chief (1812), won the praise of Sir Walter Scott; while his play, Bertram (1816), though successful, drew harsh criticism from Coleridge. A lifelong member of the clergy, serving as curate of St. Peter’s Church on Aungier Street, Maturin is now best remembered for his sprawling gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer (1820). Maturin’s great-nephew, Oscar Wilde, paid tribute to the gothic novelist by adopting the name “Sebastian Melmoth” during his final years of exile in France. Maturin died in his home on York Street on 30 October 1824.

Irish author on Goldsmiths Prize 2017 shortlist

Sara BaumeCongratulations to Sara Baume whose second book 'a line made by walking' has been shortlisted for the Goldsmiths Prize 2017. 'A line made by walking' charts a young artist's search for meaning and healing in rural Ireland. Struggling to cope with urban life and life in general, Frankie retreats to her family's rural house on "turbine hill," vacant since her grandmother's death three years earlier.

Listen back to Sara reading from and discussing 'a line made by walking' at our recent Contemporary Irish Authors series at the Central Library.

Short Stories with Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell

Danielle McLaughlinListen back to authors Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell reading from their collections and discussing their creative writing process. Recorded in the Central Library on 7 April 2017 as part of their Contemporary Irish Literature Series which took place during March and April 2017.

Danielle’s debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs On Other Planets, was published in Ireland in 2015 by The Stinging Fly Press and in the UK, US & Canada by John Murray and Random House in 2016. She has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition, The Merriman Short Story Competition in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition.

Love Leabhar Gaeilge

Cluiche na CorónachTá leabhair Ghaeilge den scoth le fáil i leabharlanna áirithe Bhaile Átha Cliath an Seachtain na Gaeilge seo i gcomhar le Love Leabhair Gaeilge.

Seo rogha de leabhair Ghaeilge le daoine fásta a fháil ar iasacht:

 Cluiche na coronach. George R.R. Martin
Úrscéal fantaisíochta móréilimh, agus an chéad imleabhar sa tsraith eipiceach ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ leis an úrscéalaí iomráiteach Meiriceánach George R. R. Martin — agus é aistrithe ag Oisín Ó Muirthile. Tá an tsraith aistrithe go hiliomad teangacha agus tá leagan scannánaithe ag HBO á chraoladh ar an teilifís go hidirnáisiúnta. I mBéarla, in 1996 a foilsíodh ar dtús é, faoin  teideal A Game of Thrones.
Seo chugainn an Geimhreadh!

Echoland is Dublin: One City, One Book 2017 Choice!

EcholandWe are delighted to announce that Echoland by Joe Joyce, published by Liberties Press, is the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2017. Echoland is the first novel in the Echoland series by Joe Joyce. Set in Dublin in the 1940s, with the threat of British or German invasion hanging over the country, it features young lieutenant Paul Duggan, who is tasked with investigating a suspected German spy. An addictive thriller about the double-dealing world of spies and politics, it shines a light on an exciting period in Ireland’s history.

The announcement follows a highly successful Dublin: One City One Book Festival in 2016, when the book choice was Fallen by Lia Mills, and the festival became Two Cities One Book, when it twinned with Belfast for the commemorative year.

Magical book found in Dublin - READ All About It!

The Boook of LearningWe invite children to delve into the world of Ebony Smart, a 12-year old girl whose world has just changed forever  - a new home in Dublin that is full of secrets, a magical book that unlocks the mystery to her past and a mysterious boy called Zach who befriends her – for the Citywide Reading Campaign for Children 2016.

The campaign is run by Dublin UNESCO City of Literature and Dublin City Public Libraries, in partnership with Mercier Press, and runs from January to March 2016.

New Author Sara Baume is Getting Noticed!

Sara BaumeSara Baume was yesterday awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature in recognition of her outstanding achievement as a fiction writer. The prize is awarded annually to an emerging Irish writer under forty years of age for a body of work that the selection committee considers shows exceptional promise. However the Prize website does state that 'a single exceptional work may warrant an award'.

Right: Sara Baume (photo: Tramp Press)

Moone Boy Thrills Hundreds!

Moone BoyThere were some 400 children in the audience at a special 'Moone Boy' event in Dublin's Liberty Hall yesterday (14th October). Chris O'Dowd and Nick V. Murphy, co-authors of 'Moone Boy: The Fish Detective' were there entertaining the children and reading from the second in the hilarious illustrated series inspired by the Sky TV series they co-wrote.

The event was organised by the Dublin UNESCO City of Literature Office in conjunction with Dublin City Public Libraries.

Fallen is One City One Book Choice for 2016!

FallenWe are delighted to announce that Lia Mills’ novel Fallen, published by Penguin Ireland, is the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2016.

We are also delighted to announce that, for the first time, Dublin will team up with Belfast for a 'Two Cities One Book' Festival.  2016 will see a partnership with Libraries NI (the library authority for Northern Ireland) so that next April readers in Dublin and Belfast will engage with the same book at the same time. The initiative was launched at noon today (14th) by an tArdmhéara Críona Ní Dhálaigh and the Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Heather Humphreys TD.

Dubliners by James Joyce

DublinersDubliners is Joyce at his most direct and his most accessible. Any reader may pick it up and enjoy these fifteen stories about the lives, loves, small triumphs and great failures of its ordinary citizens without the trepidation that might be felt on opening, say, Ulysses, famed for its impenetrability and stream-of-consciousness hyperbole. At the same time, although simply written, there is great depth and many levels to the stories, in which the characters – young, middle-aged and old – are revealed, to themselves, or sometimes only to the reader, in all their frail humanity.

Feedback