Irish fiction

Three stories from The Long Gaze Back

Michelle Read In this episode of the DCLA podcast, Michelle Read reads the first three stories featured in The Long Gaze Back. Michelle Read, is an actor and voice artist and an advocate of reading aloud for adults. She reads ‘The Purple Jar’ by Maria Edgeworth; ‘Frank's Resolve’ by Charlotte Riddell; ‘Poisson d'Avril’ by Somerville and Ross.

Recorded at the LexIcon on 12 April 2018, with thanks to Marian Keyes Dún-Laoghaire Rathdown Libraries for making the audio available to us.

A Feast of Female Voices, Cabra Library

Podcast Logo In this episode of the DCLA podcast, authors Susan Stairs, Nuala O’Connor and Eimear Ryan discuss their short stories in The Long Gaze Back. Chaired by Sinéad Gleeson.

Susan reads from ‘As seen from space’
Nuala reads from ‘Shut Your Mouth, Hélène’
Eimear reads from ‘Lane in Stay’

Women Authors of the Gallery

Jane BarlowIn this episode of the DCLA podcast, art historian Jessica Fahy discusses portraits of Irish women writers in collections of the Hugh Lane Gallery. Jessica focuses on writers and painters who were active from the end of the 19th century to the start of the Second World War including Lady Gregory, Jane Barlow, Dora Sigerson Shorter, Katharine Tynan and Alice Stopford Green.  

A Feast of Female Voices, Blanchardstown Library

Blanchardstown ensembleIn this episode of the DCLA podcast, The Long Gaze Back authors Bernie McGill, Lia Mills and Éilís Ní Dhuibhne read from their work and talk with Sinéad Gleeson about the anthology, their work, and being a female author in Ireland today.

Recorded at Blanchardstown Library on 12 April 2018, with thanks to Fingal Libraries for making the audio available to us.

John McGahern’s Dublin

authorJohn McGahern’s Dublin: the 23rd Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture will take place on Thursday 23rd January 2020 at 6pm.

2019 Award shortlist announced!

Literary Award logoThe shortlist for 2019's International Dublin Literary award has just been announced and it includes two Irish authors! The award is for novels written in English or translated to English. As well as the entries form Ireland this year's shortlist of ten includes books from France, Pakistan, the UK and the USA.

The International DUBLIN Literary Award is proudly sponsored by Dublin City Council and managed by Dublin City Libraries. The award is worth €100,000 to the winner. If the book has been translated the author receives €75,000 and the translator received €25,000.

New Laureate for Irish Fiction - Sebastian Barry.

Sebastian BarryCongratulations to Sebastian Barry, son of Dublin and well regarded around here this long time as he embarks on his three year stint as Laureate for Irish Fiction.

As who for what?

The Laureateship is an initiative of the Arts Council which has the following aims:

  • honouring an established Irish writer of fiction;
  • encouraging a new generation of writers;
  • promoting Irish literature nationally and internationally;
  • encouraging the public to engage with high quality Irish fiction.

Irish Writers of the Fantastic celebrated in new poster

Charles MaturinDublin UNESCO City of Literature have produced a new poster in association with Swan River Press, to celebrate the work of twelve Irish writers of fantasy, from Charles Maturin to Mervyn Wall. Ask in your local Dublin City library branch for a free copy!

Check www.dublincityofliterature.ie for more suggested novels, collections and short stories by the featured writers.

These are the twelve writers, with links to the library catalogue:

Charles Maturin

Charles Robert Maturin, novelist and playwright, was born in Fitzwilliam Street on 25 September 1782. In his youth he had a fascination for the gothic novels of Walpole, Radcliffe, and “Monk” Lewis. His early novel, The Milesian Chief (1812), won the praise of Sir Walter Scott; while his play, Bertram (1816), though successful, drew harsh criticism from Coleridge. A lifelong member of the clergy, serving as curate of St. Peter’s Church on Aungier Street, Maturin is now best remembered for his sprawling gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer (1820). Maturin’s great-nephew, Oscar Wilde, paid tribute to the gothic novelist by adopting the name “Sebastian Melmoth” during his final years of exile in France. Maturin died in his home on York Street on 30 October 1824.

Irish author on Goldsmiths Prize 2017 shortlist

Sara BaumeCongratulations to Sara Baume whose second book 'a line made by walking' has been shortlisted for the Goldsmiths Prize 2017. 'A line made by walking' charts a young artist's search for meaning and healing in rural Ireland. Struggling to cope with urban life and life in general, Frankie retreats to her family's rural house on "turbine hill," vacant since her grandmother's death three years earlier.

Listen back to Sara reading from and discussing 'a line made by walking' at our recent Contemporary Irish Authors series at the Central Library.

Short Stories with Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell

Danielle McLaughlinListen back to authors Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell reading from their collections and discussing their creative writing process. Recorded in the Central Library on 7 April 2017 as part of their Contemporary Irish Literature Series which took place during March and April 2017.

Danielle’s debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs On Other Planets, was published in Ireland in 2015 by The Stinging Fly Press and in the UK, US & Canada by John Murray and Random House in 2016. She has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition, The Merriman Short Story Competition in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition.

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