learning

Artist Works

Artist Works LogoHave you ever wanted to learn how to sing or to play an instrument? Do you want unlimited access to the best in video-based art & music instruction? Would you like all this for free?

Dora Maguire Historian In Residence Blog

Black and White portrait of DoraThis week I have had the great pleasure of visiting Massachusetts and presenting a paper at the annual national meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies held in Boston. It was my second time attending such a gathering, having also presented a paper on Dublin poet Maeve Cavanagh MacDowell two years ago, when ACIS met in Kansas City, Missouri. This time around I spoke about the life of Dora Maguire, another woman who happened to be profiled in R. M. Fox’s 1935 book of essays Rebel Irishwomen.

A Look Back in Books 2018

Staff Picks logoA selection of staff favourites from 2018.

One of the great things about working in a library is seeing all the wonderful new books as they arrive in. It probably won’t surprise you to hear that we do love our books in Dublin City Public Libraries, and so we’ve drawn together a selection of titles that we enjoyed in 2018. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did.

Hoonuit

Hoonuit LogoThe online resource we are looking at this week is Hoonuit  is a web-based repository of online, on demand, technology tutorials. It offers unlimited library member access to video-based software training on hundreds of common software applications and devices, including Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite, Google Docs, and iPad.

History Document of the Month: Rally round the banner boys!

Banner Boys FlyerGerald Crofts (1888–1934) was one of a small group of musicians and lyricists who made a huge contribution to the Irish independence movement in the early 20th century. He came from Capel Street originally, where his family had a shop and he was a popular singer. His brother Joseph was a composer who arranged the words and music for this marching song, which was dedicated to Crofts.

Statue of King William III

Dublin supported James II at the Battle of the Boyne, but following his defeat by William III, a protestant ascendancy resumed control of the city and began to forge links with the new and successful monarchy.  This process intensified after the death of Mary II in 1695 left William III as sole monarch. Dublin Corporation added William’s arms to the City Sword  in 1697 and in the following year, the king presented a chain of office to the Lord Mayor of Dublin, carrying the monarch’s bust on a medallion, which is in use to this day.

Tumble Book

Tumble Book LogoThis week, we are going to take a look at TumbleBooks, an online resource especially designed for the little ones in your life. TumbleBooks are animated, talking picture books which teach children the joy of reading in a format they'll love. TumbleBooks are created by taking existing picture books, and then adding animation, sound, music and narration to produce an electronic picture book which you can read, or have read to you. This resource also includes National Geographic videos and games.

World Book Online

World Book Online LogoThe e-resource featured in this week’s blog is World Book Online. A suite of three websites from the publishers of the famous World Book encyclopedias. Supplying you with accurate information at age appropriate levels in a controlled safe learning environment.

The Great Courses

Great Courses LogoWhatever your area of interest, we have an online resource for you.  Today we’re going to take a look at The Great Courses Library Collection. This resource gives our library members access to an amazing world of knowledge.

The Role of Women in the Revolutionary Decade

Cumann na mBanSometimes we forget that much of what we take for granted today was achieved by the struggle of people who fought against huge obstacles, whether it was in the national struggle for independence that we are commemorating in this decade of centenaries or in the striving to achieve decent working conditions, equality for all citizens and wide-ranging social justice. Despite the fact that women played a significant role in most of those struggles, too often the perception lingers that they were only the passive beneficiaries of men’s activities. One of the reasons for that misperception was the social policy that underpinned the institutionalisation of gender inequality, even after women gained access to the vote in 1918.

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