local studies

Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies, 2017-2018

Bang Bang*** The Lord Mayor's Certificate course in Local Studies 2017-18 is now full and not taking any more applications.   ***

However there are still places on the Certificate in Oral History. (11 August 2017)

The Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies is offered by Dublin City Council as part of its commitment to life-long learning.  The course examines the local dimension of Ireland’s past and is presented in a lively and accessible manner.  Classes are held on Tuesday evenings to facilitate attendance by a broad range of people.

Commencing in September 2017, the Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies will be taught at Dublin City Library and Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street, Dublin 2.  The closing date for applications is 5.00 p.m. on Friday 1 September 2017. See the following form:-

Jimmy Davenport Photograph Album

Jimmy DavenportJimmy Davenport (pictured here on the left in the unpeaked army hat) was a member of the orchestra and occasional performer at the Capitol and Theatre Royal theatres in Dublin in the 1930s and 40s.

These venues are long gone but the white marble staircase of the Frank Matcham designed Theatre Royal survives as the centrepiece stairway in Marks and Spencer on Grafton Street.

Judging by his autographed photo album which has just been digitised, Jimmy Davenport was a bit of a showbiz addict.  He collected over a hundred signed portraits of visiting celebrities and photos of some set pieces from the Theatre Royal.

No longer faceless or nameless – write the story of your First World War soldier

Assembly exhibitA long, long alphabetical list of 174,000 Allied soldiers who died on Belgian soil in the First World War; this is the new and emotive exhibit on display in Dublin City Library and Archive on Pearse Street until the end of March. The Assembly exhibit has been created by artist Val Carmen, for the In Flanders Fields Museum in Ypres. Consisting of a giant memorial book of the war dead and five old chairs from Passchaendaele Church, the exhibit is travelling around Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales to gather stories and mementoes of these dead soldiers.

Our Digital Repository Now Available Online

ImagesTraffic jams during the 1974 CIE Bus Strikes,  Croagh Patrick Pilgrimages (1958), and jubilant Heffo’s army supporters are among 43,000 historic photographs and documents  which are being made freely available online by Dublin City Council today.  These formerly unseen images date as early as 1757 and include photographs, postcards, letters, maps and historical memorabilia.

Highlights of the collection, which can be found at digital.libraries.dublincity.ie, include the Fáilte Ireland Photographic Collection with images of people, places and tourist locations all across Ireland from the 1930s, the Irish Theatre Archive Photographic Collection, and Dublin City Council Photographic Collection. Much of the material provides photographic evidence of Dublin's ever-changing streetscapes and buildings, as well as significant social, cultural, sporting, and political events in the City. Events as diverse as the Eucharistic Congress (1932), bonny baby competitions in the North Inner City, and the Dublin Football Team of the 1970s all feature, along with sombre Dublin streets in the aftermath of tragedies such as the 1941 North Strand and the 1974 Bombings.

The 20th John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture

Rocque King St(Podcast) 'Gentlemen’s Daughters in Dublin Cloisters: The social world of nuns in early 18th century Dublin', the 20th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Dr Bernadette Cunningham, Royal Irish Academy at the Dublin City Library and Archive on Wednesday, 25 January 2017.

The lecture looks at the social world of the communities of Poor Clare and Dominican nuns who established themselves in the Oxmantown/Grangegorman area of Dublin in the early eighteenth century.

Jonathan Swift’s garden

Bust of Jonathan SwiftJonathan Swift purchased his garden in 1722 and named it ‘Naboth’s Vineyard’; the name taken from the Bible (1 Kings 21). This garden was situated south of the Deanery of St Patrick’s and originally consisted of a large open field on the south side of Long Lane. In the summer of 1724 Swift spent £600 enclosing the field with a wall to protect his horses; a considerable sum which he afterwards claimed ‘will ruin both my health and fortune, as well as humor.’

Image: Bust of Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift’s library

Jonathan SwiftJonathan Swift was one of the most renowned authors of his day, well known in literary circles in Great Britain and Ireland, and an encourager of fledgling writers. Throughout his life he loved and collected books, he subscribed to books by other authors and purchased the books of his contemporaries. Students of Swift have shown how his reading profoundly influenced his own writing.

Swift’s library was sold after his death, on 3 February 1746, by his friend and publisher, George Faulkner in Essex Street, and the catalogue gives us an insight into the books he owned. His extensive correspondence, published in multi volume editions, shows the extent of his acquaintance and his literary discussions. At the time of his death his library contained 657 lots, a large library for an individual at the time. However, it is known that Swift also read books borrowed from friends, and read in the libraries of Trinity College and Archbishop Marsh.

Swift and Voltaire

Jonathan SwiftAt the end of the 1720s Jonathan Swift was at the height of his literary powers, he had published the best-selling Travels into several remote nations of the world by Lemuel Gulliver (Gulliver’s travels) in 1726, which had run to many editions by the end of the decade, he had written extensively on Irish affairs and was a household name in Dublin and London. Swift was well connected in the literary and social world, he was a friend and correspondent of poet Alexander Pope, and dramatists John Gay and William Congreve.

Image right: Engraved portrait of Swift

Jonathan Swift: freeman of Dublin

Jonathan SwiftIn the winter of 1729 – 1730 Jonathan Swift, Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin, was awarded the freedom of Dublin city by special grace. This was the highest honour the city could bestow on him. Members of Common Council put forward the resolution which was agreed unanimously at the Christmas quarterly assembly in 1729. In the citation, quoted in Faulkner’s Dublin Journal on 17-20 January 1729/30, Swift was named as ‘that truly worthy Patriot’.

Image right: Engraved portrait of Swift (click to enlarge)

 

Dublin: the city and the river

Boat Building and Ship Repair early 20th centuryThe area around the mouth of the River Liffey was inhabited from at least Neolithic times by farmers and fishermen. By the 8th century small churches provided the first signs of Christianity, one on the site now occupied by St Audeon’s on the hill above the Liffey. The great arc of Dublin Bay offered an inviting harbour for sea-going vessels, although its sand banks, shallows, slob lands and treacherous currents proved an obstacle to larger shipping in reaching safe anchorage upriver.

View Dublin: the city and the river image gallery.

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