local studies

Tipping off de Valera

de ValeraEamon de Valera was one of the republican prisoners who arrived back in Dublin to a tumultuous welcome on 21 June 1917. Already popularly known as one of the most senior veterans of the Rising, he became a nationwide personality when elected as MP for East Clare on 10 July 1917. At this point de Valera was living in Phibsborough, at the family home of his wife Sinead.

Image: "Irish Rebellion, May 1916. Ed. de Valera (Commandant of the Ringsend Area) Sentenced to Death; sentence commuted to Penal Servitude for life." (see larger version)

Historians in Residence – exciting new public history project

HistoriansDublin City Council has put history and communities at the heart an innovative new project which builds on last year’s commemoration of the 1916 Rising. The centenary of the Rising saw unprecedented engagement with history in the city as hundreds of thousands of citizens, visitors and community groups remembered this pivotal moment in our history.  Now Dublin City Council has recruited six Historians-in-Residence to build on this enormous public interest in history. The historians are working across the city and are talking history with the general public, community groups and schools from now until January 2018 and can be contacted at commemorations@dublicity.ie<--break->.

Historians-in-Residence pictured l-r:  Back row: Brian Hanley, Cormac Moore and Donal Fallon; Front row: Maeve Casserly, Cathy Scuffil and Darragh Gannon

The History of Social Housing in Inchicore

HI001 Riversdale House, 40 Old Kilmainham, 1914This photo gallery tells the history of social housing in Inchicore which is a suburb of Dublin, 5km west of the city centre. It traces the history of the area from tenements and one of Dublin Corporation’s first social housing schemes to the conversion of Richmond Barracks to Keogh Square then St Michael’s Estate and beyond. It challenges some of the negative perceptions about Keogh Square and St Michael’s Estate and hopes to encourage former residents to share their memories. Although Keogh Square and St Michael’s Estate dominate the narrative, they are not the only social housing in Inchicore so this gallery also includes Tyrone Place, Bulfin Court, Emmet Crescent and Thornton Heights.

View History of Social Housing in Inchicore Image Gallery.

'Some good angel'

Strike in Lewes JailHarry Boland, a tailor, originally from Phibsborough, but living in Clontarf was 30 years of age in 1917. He had been prominent in the GAA as a member of the Dublin hurling team and county chairman and was a member of the IRB and the Irish Volunteers. During Easter Week he fought in the GPO and was sentenced to ten years in prison for his role in the Rising. Boland spent the early part of his sentence in Dartmoor alongside Eamon de Valera, Thomas Ashe and Eoin MacNeill. In the spring of 1917 the prisoners were moved to Lewes jail in Sussex. There the authorities tried to clamp down on the increasingly confident republicans who refused to do prison work or obey instructions unless they were treated as soldiers. After several confrontations on 5 June the prisoners were dispersed to other locations. Boland was among those sent to Maidstone.

All-Ireland Days: The Pursuit of Liam and Sam (1953-1984)

Anton O'TooleSummer comes around, the ground hardens, and the thoughts of many people turn to the playing fields of Clones, Thurles, Castlebar, and other venues throughout the land. All dream of a visit to Croke Park in September. These photos from the Fáilte Ireland Tourism Photographic Collection celebrate the lucky few who played in All-Ireland Finals in the second half of the twentieth century.

View All-Ireland Days Image Gallery.

Dining in Dublin: 150 Years of Eating Out in Ireland’s Capital

Coffee InnWhat’s it like to eat in Dublin? As this image gallery shows, Dublin boasts a rich and varied food history that includes everything from haute cuisine to kosher pickles to a “Wan an’ Wan” by the Liffey. Some of the Dublin eateries in these pictures came in and out of existence within just a few years, making their stories harder to trace. Others evolved into cultural institutions, famous not only for their food but for their contribution to the vibrancy of Dublin life. All have enriched the flavour of the city on the Liffey.

View the Dining in Dublin Image Gallery

Lord Mayor's Certificate in Oral History, 2017-2018

Oral HistoryThe Lord Mayor’s Certificate in Oral History is offered by Dublin City Council as part of its commitment to life-long learning. The course will equip participants with skills in the preparation and conduct of oral history projects, including best practice in the collection and archiving of oral history interviews. It examines the wealth of recorded oral narrative sources in Ireland in both oral history and folklore. Commencing in Sept 2017 the Lord Mayor’s Certificate in Oral History will be taught at Dublin City Library & Archive,138–144 Pearse Street, Dublin 2.  Classes are held on Monday evenings to facilitate attendance by a broad range of people. 

** The deadline for applications is 5.00pm on Friday 15th September 2017 **

Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies, 2017-2018

Bang Bang*** The Lord Mayor's Certificate course in Local Studies 2017-18 is now full and not taking any more applications.   ***

However there are still places on the Certificate in Oral History. (11 August 2017)

The Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies is offered by Dublin City Council as part of its commitment to life-long learning.  The course examines the local dimension of Ireland’s past and is presented in a lively and accessible manner.  Classes are held on Tuesday evenings to facilitate attendance by a broad range of people.

Commencing in September 2017, the Lord Mayor's Certificate in Local Studies will be taught at Dublin City Library and Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street, Dublin 2.  The closing date for applications is 5.00 p.m. on Friday 1 September 2017. See the following form:-

Jimmy Davenport Photograph Album

Jimmy DavenportJimmy Davenport (pictured here on the left in the unpeaked army hat) was a member of the orchestra and occasional performer at the Capitol and Theatre Royal theatres in Dublin in the 1930s and 40s.

These venues are long gone but the white marble staircase of the Frank Matcham designed Theatre Royal survives as the centrepiece stairway in Marks and Spencer on Grafton Street.

Judging by his autographed photo album which has just been digitised, Jimmy Davenport was a bit of a showbiz addict.  He collected over a hundred signed portraits of visiting celebrities and photos of some set pieces from the Theatre Royal.

No longer faceless or nameless – write the story of your First World War soldier

Assembly exhibitA long, long alphabetical list of 174,000 Allied soldiers who died on Belgian soil in the First World War; this is the new and emotive exhibit on display in Dublin City Library and Archive on Pearse Street until the end of March. The Assembly exhibit has been created by artist Val Carmen, for the In Flanders Fields Museum in Ypres. Consisting of a giant memorial book of the war dead and five old chairs from Passchaendaele Church, the exhibit is travelling around Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales to gather stories and mementoes of these dead soldiers.

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