podcasts

Dublin and the Great War 1914-18

Dublin & WW1Listen back to a series of three talks on the topic of Dublin and the Great War hosted by Near FM in Coolock Library this April. The talks looked at a range of subjects including women in war time, anti-war agitation, the influence of the Russian Revolution and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and includes songs from the era performed by An Góilín Singers.

In the first talk, Near FM's Ciarán Murrary talks to Pádraig Yeates about the influence of the Russian Revolution and to John Dorney about anti-war agitation in Dublin, socialists, pacifists and republicans. Fergus Russell from An Góilín sings songs from the era. Recorded at Coolock Library on 5 April 2017.

Dublin Literary Award 2017 Winners Reading and Q&A

Hahn & AgualusaOn the evening of Thursday, 22 June, literary award winners José Eduardo Agualusa and Daniel Hahn gave a reading, followed by a Q&A session, introduced and moderated by Sinéad Crowley, in Dublin City Library & Archive, Pearse Street. Author José Eduardo Agualusa and translator Daniel Hahn were announced as winners of the 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award for Agualusa's novel A General Theory of Oblivion at a ceremony in Dublin’s Mansion House on Wednesday, 21 June 2017.

Listen to the reading and interview [play time: 53:46 minutes]:

Short Stories with Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell

Danielle McLaughlinListen back to authors Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell reading from their collections and discussing their creative writing process. Recorded in the Central Library on 7 April 2017 as part of their Contemporary Irish Literature Series which took place during March and April 2017.

Danielle’s debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs On Other Planets, was published in Ireland in 2015 by The Stinging Fly Press and in the UK, US & Canada by John Murray and Random House in 2016. She has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition, The Merriman Short Story Competition in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition.

Sara Baume reads from 'a line made by walking'

Sara BaumeListen to award-winning Irish author Sara Baume as she reads from her second novel a line made by walking, and discusses how she came to write this, and her debut novel, spill, simmer, falter, wither. Recorded at the Central Library on 9 March 2017, as part of the Contemporary Irish Literature Series.

'A line made by walking' charts a young artist's search for meaning and healing in rural Ireland. Struggling to cope with urban life and life in general, Frankie retreats to her family's rural house on "turbine hill," vacant since her grandmother's death three years earlier.

Hearts and Minds with Donal Ryan and Martin Dyar

Martin Dyar,  Donal RyanBooker-nominated novelist Donal Ryan and Patrick Kavanagh Award-winning poet Martin Dyar visited the Central Library on 2 March 2017 for a special evening of collaborative and interactive explorations of their work. Donal and Martin read from their own works and read excerpts from each others work in a special call and response format.

The two writers also discussed their writing process and the centrality of rural Ireland to their work, before answering questions from the audience.

The 20th John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture

Rocque King St(Podcast) 'Gentlemen’s Daughters in Dublin Cloisters: The social world of nuns in early 18th century Dublin', the 20th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Dr Bernadette Cunningham, Royal Irish Academy at the Dublin City Library and Archive on Wednesday, 25 January 2017.

The lecture looks at the social world of the communities of Poor Clare and Dominican nuns who established themselves in the Oxmantown/Grangegorman area of Dublin in the early eighteenth century.

Conserving Wide Street Commission Maps 1757-1849

WSC MapListen to Liz D’Arcy talk about conserving the Wide Street Commission Maps. Hear how she painstakingly removed sellotape, cleaned, repaired and strengthened these important maps.   Liz D'Arcy, Paperworks, Studio for Paper Conservation is qualified with an MA in Conservation of Fine Art on Paper. Liz is an accredited member of the 'Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic works in Ireland' (I.C.H.A.W.I) and a member of the 'Irish Professional Conservators and Restorers Association' (I.P.C.R.A).

Between 1757- 1851, the Wide Street Commission had a major impact on the development of the city, transforming it from a medieval city to the Dublin we know today.  Its function was to provide “Wide and Convenient Streets” for Dublin and it had extensive powers to acquire property by compulsory purchase, develop new streets, demolish buildings and impose design standards on building lots which were sold to developers. Dublin City Archives hold the Wide Street Commission Archives, which comprises maps, minute books and drawings. www.dublincityarchives.ie

Restoring a Georgian Dublin Residence

No. 19 North Great George's StreetListen to Harold Clarke's charming account of restoring the beautiful Georgian building, no. 19 North Great George's Street.  When Harold first viewed the house it was suffering from 180 years of dereliction but he recognised its beauty and bought it just three days later.

In this illustrated talk, Harold outlines the challenges he faced during his faithful restoration of the house, its long history,  and the delightful features he uncovered, most particularly its beautiful decorative plasterwork. The before and after photographs offer a fascinating insight into this most successful restoration process. I'm sure you will agree the results are splendid, from the beauty of the friezes and plasterwork in the drawing room and dining room, to the library room with its ceiling painted in the Dublin colours, the 100 stepped staircase, the entrance hall and the garden room.

O'Connell Street...the story of the street and its buildings

O'Connell StreetIn this podcast, architects Klaus Unger and Stephen Kane present a history of Dublin City's main thoroughfare, O'Connell Street, formerly named Sackville Street. Hear about the unique design features of some of its famous landmark buildings and the stories behind them.  Klaus and Stephen outline the origins of O'Connell Street area as it evolved from the tangle of medieval Dublin, before discussing the influence of the Wide Street Commission, Lord Gardiner, and renowned architects Edward Lovett Pearce, Richard Cassels, Gandon and Francis Johnston (Nelson's Pillar).

Working on the Railway in Dublin, 1900-1925

Rail car engravingIn the early years of the 20th century, the Great Southern and Western Railway was the largest railway system in Ireland and it was a significant employer in Dublin.  In this talk, Mary Muldowney looks at aspects of the lives of Dubliners who worked for the GS&WR, from the turn of the century to its reinvention by the Dáil in 1925.  Mary looks at working conditions, pay, pension and industrial action, focusing especially on the lives of those who were engaged at the lower levels of the pay scales, men and women who were completely dependent on the railways.  At a time of political, economic and social upheaval jobs on railway were highly prized, as they were relatively stable and often came with accommodation.

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