podcasts

Selected Shorts, part 1

the panelThe latest Dublin City Libraries and Archives podcast is the first of a two part episode, "Selected Shorts", we hear actors Rose Henderson, Susie Lamb, Katie O'Kelly and Geraldine Plunkett perform readings from The Long Gaze Back – stories by Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Lia Mills, Christine Dwyer Hickey and Anne Devlin. The second part will feature a discussion with the authors, chaired by Catherine Dunne. 

 

Natural Selection

Farmleigh line-up In this episode of the Dublin City Libraries and Archives podcast Lia Mills talks to Sinéad Gleeson, Alan Hayes, Rob Doyle and Eimear Ryan about all things anthology. How do you start to compile an anthology? What do you need to think about (before and during)? Who do you include or exclude – and how do you handle the fallout?

Recovered Voices

PanelIn this episode of the Dublin City Libraries and Archives podcast Lisa Coen, Louise Kennedy and Kathleen McMahon discuss the forgotten writings of Charlotte Riddell, Norah Hoult and Mary Lavin. Ger Ryan reads some of the works under discussion. Sinéad Gleeson chairs.

Letters of Distinction: Somerville and Ross

The Irish RM book coverIn this episode of the Dublin City Libraries and Archives podcast novelist and journalist Martina Devlin discusses the fascinating letters from Somerville and Ross to their literary agent in the early 1900s.

City of Books: New Episode

‘I am Tatty and Tatty is me’ Christine Dwyer Hickey spoke these words at the launch of Dublin One City One Book in February and she explains more about this in the 3rd episode of the City of Books podcast, which is produced and presented by Martina Devlin for Dublin UNESCO City of Literature in association with MoLI.

Get Creative in our new Recording Studios!

Creative StudioGet ready to be creative in the wonderful new recording studios located in Ballyfermot Library and soon to be available for library patron use! Aspiring musicians, podcasters, film makers, broadcasters even, take note, our Creative Studio is about to excite and delight! 

What is the Creative Studio?

It is a digital maker space facilitating the creation of music recordings, podcasts, videos, digital stories and oral histories. And more besides. At the centre of this space are two recording booths providing library patrons with access to a variety of audio and video recording equipment and software.

Women of the Brigade: St John Ambulance & The First World War

St John Ambulance bookFrom working in munitions factories, V.A.D. nursing, supporting the war effort through charitable works, and leading the anti-conscription movement, World War 1 led to a multitude of different experiences for Irish women. In this talk Pádraig Allen looks at some women of St John Ambulance who contributed to the war effort during the First World War.

Recorded at Dublin City Library and Archive on 17 April 2018.

Ireland and The Russian Revolutions (Podcast)

Russian RevolutionLast October Dublin City Archives marked the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 with a series of lunchtime talks at Dublin City Hall. The talks curated by Francis Devine examined Ireland's political and cultural reaction to the Revolution.  Here you can listen back to two talks from the series. In the first, Donal Fallon examines witness statements from the Bureau of Military History, contemporary newspapers and ephemera to ascertain what the revolution meant to the Irish Left, the Trade Union movement, Sinn Féin and asks who were the Irish Bolsheviks? Then you can listen back to Dr Brian Hanley as he considers how initial support for the Russian Revolution changed to violent opposition to Communism in Ireland.

Organised by Dublin City Library & Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street Dublin 2. Courtesy of History.com

The 21st John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture

Michael Griffin(Podcast) 'Live from the Conniving House: Poetry and Music in Eighteenth-Century Dublin' the 21st Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Dr Michael Griffin, University of Limerick at the Dublin City Library and Archive on Wednesday, 24 January 2018.

The Conniving House tavern, long since forgotten, opened in 1725. On the water not far from where Sandymount Green is now, it is the cultural and geographical starting point for this lecture on the lively interaction of poetic and musical cultures in eighteenth-century Dublin. The only verbal account that we have of that venue comes from Life of John Buncle, esq. by Thomas Amory, who heard there the famous Larry Grogan playing the pipes while Jack Lattin, ‘the most agreeable of companions’, played matchlessly on the fiddle. Other writers of the period, such as Laurence Whyte and Charles Coffey, recorded an energetic native musical culture. This lecture explores a fascinating moment in the history of Dublin’s poetical and musical cultures, one which yields several compelling instances of cross-cultural connivance.

Podcast: William Spence Engineering Works Cork Street

William SpenceIn this podcast ‘William Spence: A Victorian engineer in the right place at the right time’, Cathy Scuffil, Dublin City Council Historian in Residence, looks at the history of William Spence Engineering Works Cork Street. 

The Cork Street Foundry and Engineering Works of William Spence and Son was established in Dublin in 1856.  It continued trading over two generations of the Spence family, with no small measure of success until 1930.  The company was situated on a large, circa 3 acre industrial site located at 105 -109 Cork Street, Dublin, on a site that, until the early 1850s, had housed the tanning and currier business of a James O’Neill, who also had a residence at 26 Cork Street.

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