podcasts

The 19th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture

Gathering firewood(Podcast) "The women were worse than the men: crime in Dublin in 1916", the 19th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Pádraig Yeates at the Dublin City Library and Archive on Thursday, 21 January 2016, at 6:00pm.

Pádraig Yeates is a journalist, trade union activist and distinguished social and labour historian. He is an expert on the history of Dublin in the early decades of the 20th century. He is best known as the author of a series of books on Dublin in the revolutionary period as published between 2000 and 2015: A City in Wartime: Dublin 1914-1918, A City in Turmoil: Dublin, 1919-192 and A City in Civil War : Dublin, 1921-1924. He is the author Lockout, the standard work on the great 1913 labour dispute in Dublin. 

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Poetry Reading with Rosemarie Rowley

Rosemarie Rowley'Girls of the Globe' was a poetry reading by Rosemarie Rowley held at Pearse Street Library on 17 June 2015.

Rosemarie Rowley has been writing for four decades, often in formal verse, and often about women and their experiences.  A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, she has worked abroad and presented papers at conferences worldwide.

Poetry Reading with Iggy McGovern

Mystic DreamThe life of 19th century mathematician and poet, William Rowan Hamilton, was told through a sequence of sonnets by poet Iggy McGovern and friends Paula Murphy and Noel Duffy at Pearse Street Library 26 February 2015.

William Rown Hamilton (1805-65) was the foremost mathematician of the mid nineteenth century.  Iggy McGovern's 'A mystic dream of 4' is a sonnet sequence based on the life and time of this remarkable Irishman.

The Darker Side of Children's Literature

Come CloserCoinciding with the launch of a new database of children's books and accompanying exhibition,  Timothy Young (Yale University) delivered a lecture at Dublin City Library & Archive on 28 September 2015 entitled 'Happy Deaths and Urban Dangers: The Darker Side of Children's Literature'.

Young is curator of the Betsy Beinecke Shirley Collection of American Children's Literature, Yale University.

Transcript

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Ireland's Harp: shaping a nation's identity

Irish HarpMary Louise O’Donnell gave a talk and recital titled "Ireland's Harp: shaping a nation's identity" in the Central Library, Ilac Centre on 12 March. Her talk traces the history and evolution of this treasured national emblem and glorious musical tradition. You can listen to a recording of the event below or download to listen to offline.

The image of the harp – symbolic of the political and cultural landscape of Ireland for centuries – evokes strong sentiments in the collective Irish imagination. This iconic instrument became the emblem on Irish coinage in the sixteenth century. Since then it has been symbolic of Irish culture, music, and politics – finally evolving into a significant marker of national identity in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

The 18th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture

Kevin Whelan"Dublin as a global city: through time and space", the 18th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture, was given by Kevin Whelan at the Dublin City Library and Archive on 22 January 2015.

Kevin Whelan, Director Keough-Naughton Institute, Notre Dame Centre in Dublin, has worked as a visiting professor at New York University, Boston College and Concordia University (Montreal). He has written or edited fifteen books and over a hundred articles on Ireland’s history, geography and culture. He has also lectured in over a dozen countries, and at the Sorbonne, Cambridge, Oxford, Torino, Berkeley, Yale, Dartmouth and Louvain.

Celebrating 75 years of Finnegans Wake

Shannon Colleens May 2014 marked the 75th anniversary of the publication of Finnegans Wake.  To celebrate Dublin City Public Libraries hosted the wonderful Sinead Murphy and Darina Gallagher performing Here's Comes Everybody! a musical journey through Finnegans Wake.  

This performance explores the musical pulse at the heart of Finnegans Wake. The irreverence and subversion of Joyce's comic masterpiece is evoked through parlour song, music hall, nursery rhyme, folk song, street ballads, sea shanties, hymns, carols and the American songbook. James Joyce filled his work with music and in Finnegans Wake there are almost 1,000 song references and allusions. These songs create the dreamlike transformations of the Porter- Earwicker family and express the ambience and cadences peculiar to the city of Dublin.

Rathmines' Literary Heritage: A Sense of Place

Rathmines can boast a rich literary heritage having played host to many leading literary figures including James Joyce, William Carleton, George Russell and Paul Durcan. "A Sense of Place", a literary evening held at Rathmines Library, honoured the rich literary life of the area. Local writers Evelyn Conlon, Adrian Kenny, Siobhán Parkinson and Fintan Vallely read selected pieces of their work and discussed the locality and how it may have influenced their writing. The evening was chaired by Niall MacMonagle and also featured Fintan Vallely playing a jig called "The Barley Grain" on the flute.

Rathmines literary wall

Literary wall at Rathmines Library celebrating the literary heritage of Rathmines and beyond

This event took place on Wednesday, 23 October 2013 at 6.30pm, at Rathmines Library and was part of the programme celebrating Rathmines Library 1913 - 2013 100 Years at the Heart of the Community.

Andrew Carnegie, The Library Man

Andrew CarnegieIn 1902, Rathmines and Rathgar Urban District Council applied for a grant to Andrew Carnegie who was at that time dispensing large sums of money for the building of libraries, the world over. The application was successful and in 1903 a sum of £7,500, later increased to £8,500 was granted. The Library and Technical Institute were opened on October 24th, 1913.

Right: Andrew Carnegie

To celebrate the centenary of Rathmines Library, Brendan Langley gave a talk on the fascinating life of Andrew Carnegie, the industrialist and philanthropist entitled "Andrew Carnegie, The Library Man". Brendan Langley is a local historian with a long association with the Rathmines, Ranelagh and Rathgar Historical Society.

The lecture took place on Tuesday, 15 October 2013 at 6.30pm, at Rathmines Library and was part of the programme celebrating Rathmines Library 1913 - 2013 100 Years at the Heart of the Community.

Irish Carnegie Libraries, An Architectural History

Rathmines LibraryBetween 1897 and 1913, Andrew Carnegie donated over £170,000 to fund the building of eighty libraries in Ireland. Sixty-two of those libraries have survived to the present day including Rathmines Library, which opened on 24 October 1913. To celebrate the centenary of Rathmines Library, Brendan Grimes gave a very interesting talk outlining the history of Irish Carnegie Libraries and detailing the architectural history of Rathmines Library entitled "Irish Carnegie Libraries, an Architectural History".

Brendan Grimes is an architect and former lecturer of the School of Architecture, DIT. His publications include Irish Carnegie libraries, a catalogue and architectural history and Majestic shrines and graceful sanctuaries, the church architecture of Patrick Byrne 1783-1864.

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