podcasts

Crime and the City: Crime and History

Crime nad the City logoCrime is serious business in Dublin and we love to read about it. From novels about detectives to accounts of serial killers, from gangster biographies to analysis of social issues, we have an appetite for all of it. During October the Central Library hosted 'Crime in the City: Crime and History', a series of talks and readings looking at the broad issue of crime in Dublin through the ages. This series of events brought together writers of fiction, historians, researchers and bloggers to inform, entertain and promote discussion. 

So if you are a lover of crime fiction, historical fiction or just interested in the history of Dublin, you are sure to enjoy listening back to these fascinating talks and readings. 

If you can't get enough crime don't forget the Irish Crime Fiction Festival is on soon! Michael Russell and Kevin McCarthy will join Conor Brady, Stuart Neville and Eoin McNamee to discuss historical crime fiction on Saturday 23rd November 10-11.15am. 

Who Feared to Wear the Red Hand Badge! Songs and Poems of 1913 Lockout

Image from A Capital in Conflict, Dublin City and the 1913 Lockout. Copyright: Dublin City Library & ArchiveThe Lockout 1913 inspired many poems, ballads, songs and rhymes. Many of which were published in The Irish Worker. These poems and ballads provide a vivid portrait of the conditions faced by Dubliners during the Lockout, the battle between the Irish Transport and General Workers’ Union and the Dublin Employers’ Federation and the key personalities of the time.

As part of the City Hall Springtime Lectures Francis Devine and Fergus Russell performed ballads and songs of the 1913 Lockout. Songs include 'Freedom's Pioneers' by James Connolly and 'The Red Hand Badge' by AP Wilson.

Right: Image from A Capital in Conflict, Dublin City and the 1913 Lockout. Copyright: Dublin City Library & Archive

Living History: politics of the USA from the 1950s to the 1970s

Vincent Lavery

Vincent Lavery is a retired secondary school teacher who taught U.S. Government and Economics in the States. He is an active member of the United States of America Democratic Party. He worked with Senator Robert F Kennedy's campaign for president in 1968.  He was a County Chairman in Central California and a delegate to the 1968 Convention in Chicago. He worked for Senator Kennedy for sixteen months. He promoted concerts in California during the 1960s and he turned down the opportunity to manage The Doors and Jim Morrison. He has coedited four books on soccer and football and coached soccer at several levels ranging from under 16 to adult.

Songs of Murder, Madams and Mayhem

To celebrate Culture Night 2013 Marino Library held an evening of Dublin ballads with Anne and Niamh Buckley. The sisters delighted the packed audience with ballads that ranged from hearbreaking to gruesome. With these songs of murder, madams and mayhem perhaps staff member Anne is falling under the influence of the ghost of Marino born Bram Stoker and the library's Gothic Literature Collection!

If you'd like to hear more, good listeners are always welcome at An Góilín, Traditional Singer's Club based in The Teacher's Club, Parnell Square, Dublin. 

Niamh Buckley and Anne Buckley

The Bonny Light Horseman

The Bonny Light Horseman is a traditional English lament from the Napoleonic wars. This version is from Oisín and Geraldine MacGowan's 1980 LP Over the Moor to Maggie. Planxty also recorded a version on their 1979 album After the Break.

Listen to Anne Buckley and Niamh Buckley singing 'The Bonny Light Horseman', a traditional English lament from the Napoleonic wars, in front of a live audience at Marino Library on Culture Night, 20 September 2013.

Pirate Jenny

Pirate Jenny is from The Threepenny Opera by German dramatist Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt Weill. It was adapted from The Beggar's Opera (1728) by John Gay and was first performed in Berlin in 1928. Check availability The Collected Plays of Bertolt Brecht in the library catalogue.

Listen to Anne Buckley and Niamh Buckley sing 'The Pirate Jenny' from The Threepenny Opera in front of a live audience at Marino Library on Culture Night, 20 September 2013.

The Spoons Murder

The Spoons Murder is a grisly murder ballad written by an extraordinary Cork man, Con "Fada" Ó Drisceoil. Con is a singer, songwriter and accordian player and member of The Four Star Trio. Con's humourous songs and ballads are published in Spoons Murder and other mysteries which also features a CD (2006).

Listen to Anne Buckley singing 'The Spoons Murder' in front of a live audience at Marino Library on Culture Night, 20 September 2013.

Madam I'm a Darling

Frank HarteThis is Frank Harte's version of Madam I'm a Darling. Frank Harte (1933-2005) was a Irish traditional singer, song collecter, architect and lecturer from Chapelizod, Dublin. He collected and published traditional folk songs and ballads of Dublin in Songs of Dublin.  He is celebrated every September with the annual Frank Harte Festival.

Listen to Anne Buckley and Niamh Buckley singing Madam I'm a Darling in front of a live audience at Marino Library on Culture Night, 20 September 2013.

The Two Sisters

The Two Sisters is Child Ballad number 10. The Child Ballads are a collection of 305 traditional songs collected by Francis James Child in the 19th century. They were originally published as Popular English and Scottish Ballads between 1882 and 1898. The Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads are available for reference in the Music Library.

Listen to Anne and Niamh Buckley singing Child Ballad number 10, 'The Two Sisters', in front of a live audience at Marino Library on Culture Night, 20 September 2013.

The 16th Annual Sir John T. Gilbert Lecture

"Dublin after Dark: Glimpses of Life in an Early Modern City", by Maighréad Ní Mhurchadha, Local Historian

On 23 January 2013 sixteenth annual Sir John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture was held at Dublin City Library and Archive, Pearse Street. The lecture was given by Maighréad Ní Mhurchadha, who has published many books on the history of Dublin including Early Modern Dubliners (2008) and Fingal, 1603-60, contending neighbours in North Dublin (2005).

Transcript

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