videos

Dublin: A Year in Words

Darragh O'ReillyDublin: A Year in Words is a Dublin UNESCO City of Literature project which showcased the breadth and diversity of our city’s living poets through a year-long series of poetry videos filmed across 12 Dublin bookshops.

Like the city itself, the poets featured in the series are more than the sum of their parts. Collectively they tell of a Dublin full of light and shade, a city of contradictions, in constant flux. They show us that the story of Dublin is everybody’s to tell. It has no fixed points. Beyond wild, it exists far more in the unspoken and the unseen than any attempt to distil it down to a neat package can do justice to. And yet it is our poets perhaps more than anyone who have grappled with the task of laying our lifelines bare and bringing voice to the city. Dublin A Year in Words presents a cross-section of 12 poets who do just that, filmed in establishments that keep the city’s essence alive.

Here's a playlist featuring all 12 poems from the series:

Highlights from the International Dublin Literary Award 2017

José Eduardo AgualusaOn Wednesday, 21 June author Jose Eduardo Agualusa and translator Daniel Hahn were announced as winners of the 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award for Agualusa's novel A General Theory of Oblivion.  The Award is organised and sponsored by Dublin City Council and at €100,000 is the world's largest prize for a single novel published in English. Uniquely, the Award receives its nominations from public libraries in cities around the globe and recognises both writers and translators.

In case you missed it we have photos and videos from the Award ceremony.

Messines Peace Park: Its contribution to Irish-British reconciliation

speakers & organisersDublin City Library and Archive and The Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association presented a seminar titled 'Messines Peace Park: Its contribution to Irish-British reconciliation' on Friday 19 May at The Council Chamber, City Hall, Dame Street. Many thanks to all speakers, Bertie Ahern, Barabara Walshe, Dr Chris McGimpsey, Dr Alasdair McDonnell and Tom Burke and to the Lord Mayor of Dublin Brendan Carr, who formally opened the seminar. Thank-you to Paddy Harte Junior who read Peace Pledge to formally close the seminar.

About The Messines Peace Park

Messines Peace ParkThe Island of Ireland Peace Park, more usually known as the Messines Peace Park, is a memorial to the soldiers on the island of Ireland who died, were wounded or went missing during World War I. It is located close to site of the June 1917 battle for The Wijtschate -Messines Ridge. The project was initiated by A Journey of Reconciliation Trust, a broadbased cross-border Irish organization which hopes to bring together people of diverse beliefs. The Trust comprised representatives of the main churches in Ireland, with professional and political representatives together with community leaders from both parts of Ireland under the leadership of Paddy Harte and Glenn Barr.

Conserving Wide Street Commission Maps 1757-1849

WSC MapListen to Liz D’Arcy talk about conserving the Wide Street Commission Maps. Hear how she painstakingly removed sellotape, cleaned, repaired and strengthened these important maps.   Liz D'Arcy, Paperworks, Studio for Paper Conservation is qualified with an MA in Conservation of Fine Art on Paper. Liz is an accredited member of the 'Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic works in Ireland' (I.C.H.A.W.I) and a member of the 'Irish Professional Conservators and Restorers Association' (I.P.C.R.A).

Between 1757- 1851, the Wide Street Commission had a major impact on the development of the city, transforming it from a medieval city to the Dublin we know today.  Its function was to provide “Wide and Convenient Streets” for Dublin and it had extensive powers to acquire property by compulsory purchase, develop new streets, demolish buildings and impose design standards on building lots which were sold to developers. Dublin City Archives hold the Wide Street Commission Archives, which comprises maps, minute books and drawings. www.dublincityarchives.ie

Restoring a Georgian Dublin Residence

No. 19 North Great George's StreetListen to Harold Clarke's charming account of restoring the beautiful Georgian building, no. 19 North Great George's Street.  When Harold first viewed the house it was suffering from 180 years of dereliction but he recognised its beauty and bought it just three days later.

In this illustrated talk, Harold outlines the challenges he faced during his faithful restoration of the house, its long history,  and the delightful features he uncovered, most particularly its beautiful decorative plasterwork. The before and after photographs offer a fascinating insight into this most successful restoration process. I'm sure you will agree the results are splendid, from the beauty of the friezes and plasterwork in the drawing room and dining room, to the library room with its ceiling painted in the Dublin colours, the 100 stepped staircase, the entrance hall and the garden room.

1916: How will you remember?

Banners"Dublin Remembers 1916" has been an extensive series of lectures, talks by expert historians, exhibitions and conferences in Dublin libraries, City Hall, Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane and other venues in the city throughout 2016.

A range of history-based activities and initiatives were delivered, designed to deepen and broaden our understanding of the events of 1916 and that pivotal period in our history.

There were a number of formal commemorative events, focused on remembering and honouring those who took part in the Easter Rising, and especially those who gave their lives.

1916: How will you remember? from Dublin City Public Libraries on Vimeo.

Come to Libraries, Come to Life

4 faces'Come to Libraries, Come to Life' is a series of video interviews with users of library services in Dublin City Public Libraries, in partnership with Ballyfermot College of Further Education. The goal of the project is to show the diversity of the kinds of people that use libraries, and to demonstrate what the services mean to them. Eva in Pembroke library is a regular visitor, and has come with her family for many years, enjoying the wide variety of events that the library has held; she is also a regular attendee at the Pembroke book club. In Cabra Library, Teresa is a regular visitor with her three children; their voracious appetites for reading are more than satisfied by the varied and extensive book selection. Pat in the Business Library uses the many databases and newspaper archives that are available, and believes that the services public libraries provide are vital in providing free education for anyone who wants to access it. Lastly Tatiana has been coming to the Open Learning Centre for a number of years, having arrived in Ireland with very little English – you can see in her interview that her hard work in the learning centre has paid off as she expresses herself very well and shares her experience of how the libraries have influenced her life.

View the four videos below (scroll through the playlist):

Remembering 1916 - Easter Weekend, a Look Back

SmithfieldThousands took to the streets on a glorious Easter Monday in March to remember the 1916 Rising. Dublin City Council was in Smithfield Square with library staff and the Dublin Fire Brigade. We unveiled the Learning Bus with its retro-fit Edwardian parlour, author Lia Mills was on hand to promote “Fallen” the One City One Book choice for 2016 and we were serenaded by the Drum and Pipe band from the Dublin Fire Brigade. Re-enactors from both sides, 1916 Rising rebels and First World War troops, joined us to talk to people about their uniforms and kit.

Watch the wonderful video below. And look out for one of the library staff acting the part of a newsboy!

Literary Award Winner's Acceptance Speech

Akhil SharmaOn Thursday, 9 June 2016, in the Mansion House in Dublin, Family Life by Akhil Sharma was announced as the winner of the 21st International DUBLIN Literary Award. Akhil Sharma was born in Delhi, India, and moved with his family to the United States when he was eight. He is also the author of An Obedient Father, winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He lives in New York City and is an assistant professor of English at Rutgers University, Newark.

Commenting on his win, Akhil Sharma said: “To be acknowledged by people I respect is a strange thing. I can’t say I fooled them. I feel abashed by this honor.”  

Watch Akhil deliver his acceptance speech:

Dublin: A Great Place to Start (Video)

Dublin Gereat Place to beThe 'Dublin: A Great Place to Start' digital storytelling project celebrates some of the new beginnings that happen every day in Dublin 1 where plans are being developed for the City Library at Parnell Square Cultural Quarter.

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