History eAudiobooks

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Audiobook on the goIt's Dublin Festival of History time and to celebrate we've put together a short list of history eAudiobooks that you may enjoy. Now you can satisfy your curiosity for the past and your interest in history while walking, running, in the car, cooking dinner or even at the gym.  All these titles are available to download or reserve now.  All you need is a WiFi connection and your library membership! So if you haven't signed up already, visit library.bolindadigital.com/dublin and sign in using your library membership card number and PIN. You can borrow up to 5 eAudiobooks at a time to listen on your phone, tablet, mp3 player.

Don't forget we also have hundreds of history audiobooks that you can borrow as CD or Mp3 player from your local library.



A Short History of Nearly EverythingShort History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
Read by William Roberts
A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's fascinating and humorous quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science.




In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel PhilbrickIn the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick
Read by Scott Brick
The number one bestselling, epic true-life story of one of the most notorious maritime disasters of the 19th century.
The sinking of the whaleship Essex by an enraged sperm whale in the Pacific in November 1820 set in motion one of the most dramatic sea stories of all time: the twenty sailors who survived the wreck took to three small boats (one of which was again attacked by a whale) and only eight of them survived their subsequent 90-day ordeal, after resorting to cannibalising their mates.



NemesisNemesis: The Battle for Japan, 1944–45 by Max Hastings
Read by Cameron Stewart
International bestselling author
Max Hastings’ account of the battle for Japan is a masterful military history.
Featuring the most remarkable cast of commanders the world has ever seen, the dramatic battle for Japan of 1944–45 was acted out across the vast stage of Asia: Imphal and Kohima, Leyte Gulf and Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Soviet assault on Manchuria.

 

One Summer American, 1927One Summer: America, 1927 by Bill Bryson
Read by Bill Bryson
In the summer of 1927, America had a booming stock market, a president who worked just four hours a day (and slept much of the rest of the time), a semi-crazed sculptor with a mad plan to carve four giant heads into an inaccessible mountain called Rushmore, a devastating flood of the Mississippi, a sensational murder trial, and a youthful aviator named Charles Lindbergh who started the summer wholly unknown and finished it as the most famous man on earth. (So famous that Minnesota considered renaming itself after him.)




Empress Dowager CixiEmpress Dowager Cixi: The Concubine Who Launched Modern China by Jung Chang
Read by Pik-sen Lim
Empress Dowager Cixi (1835–1908) is the most important woman in Chinese history. She ruled China for decades and brought a medieval empire into the modern age.
In this groundbreaking biography, Jung Chang vividly describes how Cixi fought against monumental obstacles to change China. Under her the ancient country attained virtually all the attributes of a modern state: industries, railways, electricity, the telegraph and an army and navy with up-to-date weaponry. It was she who abolished gruesome punishments like “death by a thousand cuts” and put an end to foot-binding. She inaugurated women’s liberation and embarked on the path to introduce parliamentary elections to China. Chang comprehensively overturns the conventional view of Cixi as a diehard conservative and cruel despot.


Conquistadors by Michael WoodConquistadors by Michael Wood
Read by John Telfer
Conquistadors is Michael Wood at his best - thoughtful, provocative and gripping history. Wood brings these stories to vivid life, highlighting both the heroic accomplishments and the complex moral legacy of the European invasion.  The Spanish conquest of the Americas in the sixteenth century was one of the most important and cataclysmic events in history. Spanish expeditions endured incredible hardships in order to open up the lands of the 'New World', and few stories in history can match these for drama and endurance.



PompeiiPompeii: The Life of a Roman Town by Mary Beard
Read by Phyllida Nash
Pompeii explodes a number of myths - among them, the very date of the eruption, probably a few months later than usually thought…Other exploded myths include the hygiene of the baths, which must have been hotbeds of germs; the legendary number of brothels, most likely only one; and the death count, which was probably less than ten per cent of the population.

 

Dublin Festival of HistoryDublin Festival of History

Dublin Festival of History takes place all over Dublin city from 23 September to 8 October. Once again the Festival programme offers lectures, film, walking tours and exhibitions. History will be brought to people’s doorsteps via the city’s branch library network with a series of talks and workshops.

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