Dublin One City One Book

The Country Girls Trilogy, Dublin One City One Book 2019

The Country Girls trilogyDublin City Council’s Public Library Service is pleased to announce that The Country Girls Trilogy by Edna O’Brien, is the Dublin One City One Book choice for 2019. Dublin One City One Book is a Dublin City Council initiative, led by Dublin City Public Libraries, which encourages everyone to read a book connected with the capital city during the month of April every year. The annual initiative includes a full programme of events based around the book. 

Published by Faber & Faber,  this volume is introduced by Eimear McBride and includes The Country Girls and its sequels The Lonely Girl and Girls in Their Married Bliss, which changed the temperature of Irish literature in the 1960s and inspired generations of readers and writers. The passion, artistry and courage of Edna O’Brien’s vision in these novels continue to resonate into the 21st century.

Dublin: a City Made of Stories?

Pictured left-right: Nessa O'Mahony, Ellen Rowley, Garett Fagan, Kelly Fitzgerald and Niamh PuirséilWhat do we think of when we think of Dublin?

How has the history and physical shape of the city influenced its poems, songs and stories? How do poems, songs, stories, history and the built environment create our sense of Dublin as a city? Join Garrett Fagan, for a lively panel discussion on what makes Dublin the city that it is.

Pictured left-right: Nessa O'Mahony, Ellen Rowley, Garrett Fagan, Kelly Fitzgerald and Niamh Puirséil

Listen to a recording of ‘Dublin: a City Made of Stories?’ Poets, folklorists, historians and city geographers discuss how poems, songs, stories, history and the physical space create our sense of Dublin as a city. This event was organised by Garrett Fagan, and was held in the National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street on Saturday, 12 April as part of Dublin: One City, One Book 2014.

James Joyce Anniversary!

James Joyce(Reproduced with the permission of Dublin: One City One Book.)

Today, Thursday, 2nd February, is the 130th anniversary of the birth of James Joyce!

Arguably Ireland’s greatest literary genius and a leading proponent of modernism in fiction, James Joyce was born at 41 Brighton Square to John Stanislaus Joyce and Mary Jane Murray, and spent his earliest years there and in Castlewood Avenue. He was educated at Clongowes Wood College and at Belvedere College before going on to University College Dublin (on St Stephen’s Green), where he studied modern languages.

Right: James Joyce. Image of Joyce reproduced from the original glass negative held in UCD Library Special Collections by kind permission of Helen Solterer. (click image to enlarge)

Joyce left Ireland with Nora Barnacle in 1904, and was to spend the rest of his life in Italy and France, paying his last visit to Ireland in 1912. Joyce died in Zurich on the 13th January, 1941, and is buried in Zurich's Fluntern Cemetery.

Joyce's collection of short stories, Dubliners, and the choice for Dublin: One City, One Book 2012, was first published in 1914 by Grant Richards Ltd., London.

Becoming John Gray

Bookcover: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar WildeListen to a talk by Jerusha McCormack on John Gray and celebrity culture. The lecture was held at Dublin City Library & Archive on 26 April 2010 as part of Dublin: One City, One Book 2010.

John Gray was an ordinary working-class man who, as the alleged model for the “Dorian” of Oscar Wilde’s novel, became a household name. How did this happen? Did Wilde in fact invent John Gray? What forces colluded to help manufacture this new kind of fame –known to us now as “celebrity culture” – and what was its price? By retelling the story of the man who became Dorian Gray, Jerusha McCormack seeks to throw new light on the power of Wilde’s novel: to create as well as to destroy those around him – and finally to conscript the very life of the author himself.

Listen to the talk [play time: 58:38 minutes]:

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