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2017 Gilbert Lecture Publication Available

Gilbert 2017 cover detailThe 20th annual Sir John T. Gilbert Commemorative Lecture,  'Gentlemen’s Daughters in Dublin Cloisters: The social world of nuns in early eighteenth century Dublin', is now available for purchase in book form.  The lecture looks at the social world of the communities of Poor Clare and Dominican nuns who established themselves in the Oxmantown/Grangegorman area of Dublin in the early eighteenth century. The 20th Gilbert lecture was given by Bernadette Cunningham, at Dublin City Library & Archive on Wednesday 25 January 2017.

The book was launched on Wednesday, 24 January, on the occasion of the 21st Gilbert lecture at the Dublin City Library & Archive in Pearse Street. Price is €8 and details are available on how to purchase / check availability in the library catalogue.

Podcast: William Spence Engineering Works Cork Street

William SpenceIn this podcast ‘William Spence: A Victorian engineer in the right place at the right time’, Cathy Scuffil, Dublin City Council Historian in Residence, looks at the history of William Spence Engineering Works Cork Street. 

The Cork Street Foundry and Engineering Works of William Spence and Son was established in Dublin in 1856.  It continued trading over two generations of the Spence family, with no small measure of success until 1930.  The company was situated on a large, circa 3 acre industrial site located at 105 -109 Cork Street, Dublin, on a site that, until the early 1850s, had housed the tanning and currier business of a James O’Neill, who also had a residence at 26 Cork Street.

Who Next…? A guide to children's authors

Children's booksWho Next...? is specially designed to help parents, teachers and librarians in encouraging children and young people to explore the world of reading. When children ask: “Who can I read next?” or “Who writes like my favourite author?”, the answers are in Who Next…? 

This is a great tool to help children explore the world of reading. As the award winning author, Alan Gibbons, says “A reading child is a successful child”. Writers of children’s fiction are listed with suggestions of other authors who write in a similar way, together with key book and series titles.

What did Rathmines Library Book Clubs read in 2017?

booksRathmines book clubs have had a busy year! If you are looking for reading inspiration or ideas for your book club you'll find lots in this list.  Included are a mix of contemporary literary favourites, modern classics and books in translation. Book club favourites from the past ten years such as The Elegance of the Hedgehog, Olive Kitteridge and The Lacuna come highly recommended. It's great to see modern American classics East of Eden, Cider with Rosie and Fahrenheit 451 continue to provoke thought and discussion.

Books clubs are a super way to expand your reading, your mind and your social circle! Why not join one of our friendly book clubs this year? Or if you already have a book club you might consider affiliating with Dublin City Public Libraries. Benefits include ready access to books, priority booking for our annual Readers' Day, copies of Fiction Matters, and advance notification about many book events.

Wondering what to read next?

choosing a book“I’ve read everything written by my favourite authors, what shall I read next?”  Sound familiar? Well this online resource, now available with your library membership, will help answer that dilemma.

Get book recommendations anywhere, anytime with Who Else Writes Like...?

Who Else Writes Like...? is an established reference resource and reading promotion tool. It is designed to help anyone who enjoys reading fiction to expand the number of writers they read.

Story Time project highlights benefits of reading with your children

Story timeRegular reading at home with your child encourages the development of social and communication skills and improves your child's thinking, language and self-expression.

The fantastic Story Time Project aims to support reading at home and gives parents tips and suggestions on ways to read to, and with your children, such as putting on an animated voice to enliven characters.  Pausing to ask open questions such as “I wonder why.....” for instance encourages children to think, talk, ask questions, and relate the story events to their own life – thus internalising the language and using it in a context outside of the book.

This is different than the way most of us might read to our children – I read, you listen. This more interactive storytime is lots of fun and parents often find they learn new things about their children.  Parents are enthused because they understand that this is helping their children - and it is fun. Feedback is incredibly positive.

Marjorie Hasler: A Suffragist Martyr

Marjorie HaslerMarjorie Hasler (c. 1887 -1913) joined the Irish Women’s Franchise League (IWFL), a militant suffrage group, in 1910. She was at the frontline of the women’s suffrage campaign during its explosive pre-war years. She travelled to London in November 1910 to protest against the Liberal Prime Minister H.H. Asquith’s dismissal of a Conciliation Bill that would extend voting rights to women. The suffragists were attacked by the police in an event that became known as ‘Black Friday’. Marjorie was among those injured when her head struck a wall during the agitation. Undaunted she travelled to London once more in November 1911 where she was imprisoned for breaking government windows (the suffragists’ preferred protest strategy). She spent fourteen days in Holloway prison.

Bubble Street Gang return for 2018 Citywide Reading Campaign for Children

Making MillionsOver the next two months, children across Dublin are invited to continue the adventure with the Bubble Street Gang as Making Millions by Erika McGann is the chosen book for the 2018 Citywide Reading Campaign for Children.

The aim of the campaign is to promote reading for pleasure so girls and boys across the city are encouraged to pick up a copy of Making Millions, the second book about Cass and the Bubble Street Gang, in their local library or bookshop. The book is suitable for children 7-10 years.

The launch of the 2018 campaign took place today, 17 January in Pearse St Library, where enthusiastic readers of the book met the author.   

Erika McGann said, “I’m so excited and delighted that Making Millions is the 2018 Citywide Read. I live in the heart of the city and I’ve already met and shared stories with a lot of kids through Dublin City Libraries. I’m looking forward to meeting many more and to hearing their stories about secret forts, jumble sales, ghost stories and getting up to (just a little bit of) mischief.”

ArtistWorks - free online music learning with your library card

ArtistWorksYou can now access thousands of music and art lessons online with ArtistWorks for Libraries and your library card.  Whether you're just starting out or interested in improving your skills, you'll benefit from their step-by-step instruction from some of the world's most sought-after musicians and teachers.  You learn through self-paced video lessons from Grammy Award-winning music and artistic professionals.  As in a real music class you can then get feedback on your progress from your teacher by uploading your own videos. 

ArtistWorks for Libraries offers both musical and artistic instruction, from introduction to advanced performance. The lessons cover guitar, banjo, trumpet, mandolin, electric bass, vocals, percussion, cello, jazz saxophone, ukulele and much more. It's a great way to get to grips with a musical instrument anywhere, anytime and at your own pace and without the high cost of private instruction.

Borrow the Costa Book Award 2017 winners

Reservoir 13Jon McGregor, who won the International Dublin Literary Award in 2012 for Even the Dogs, has won the Costa (fiction) Award for his fourth novel, 'Reservoir 13'. Also among the winners is a book that needs no introduction as everyone is either talking about, reading or trying to get their hands on it - Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. This book is proving immensely popular with readers in our libraries.  Rebecca Stott’s rivetting father daughter book about growing up in a fundamental Christian cult, the Exclusive Brethren won in the Biography section, while Helen Dunmore, who sadly passed away last June, is the posthumous winner of the Poetry award.  The children's book award went to The Explorer by Katherine Rundell, the story of four children's struggle to survive in the Amazon following a plane crash.  Katherine previously won acclaim (and awards) with her novel Rooftoppers (2013).

The Costa Award category winners with links to the library catalogue:

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