Blog

Finglas travellers: a snapshot

As part of our commitment to exploring local history, and due to the large Traveller Community in the area, notices were displayed in Finglas Library in early 2019 looking for old photographs of Travellers. Sr. Patricia Lahiff, an educator and community worker based in Finglas since the 1970s, made contact.

 

History Document of the Month: Lepracaun Cartoon Collection

Cover of Lepracaun CartoonBritain faced similar issues ruling Ireland and India: both had to be held to maintain British international credibility and independence movements in both were driven in large part by religion.

Artist Works

Artist Works LogoHave you ever wanted to learn how to sing or to play an instrument? Do you want unlimited access to the best in video-based art & music instruction? Would you like all this for free?

Séamus Ennis, Final Years

Larkin statueThis year marks the centenary of the birth of Séamus Ennis, the renowned musician, singer, folklorist and broadcaster who left behind, to quote from one obituary, “a priceless heritage of Irish tradition to the nation”. Inspired by on-going centenary events taking place across Dublin and at the Séamus Ennis Arts Centre, this blog briefly examines Ennis’s final years and death.

Dublin Cattle Market – A workplace that has disappeared

Historians in Residence Work and the availability of it is one of the features of human society that can be very contradictory in nature but has a huge impact, on the individual, on the community and on the shape of the physical environment in which they are situated. Dublin has expanded enormously since the beginning of the 20th century and many of the industries that were providing employment at that time have changed; either disappearing altogether or adapting to technological and other developments in the intervening century.

 

2019 Award shortlist announced!

Literary Award logoThe shortlist for 2019's International Dublin Literary award has just been announced and it includes two Irish authors! The award is for novels written in English or translated to English. As well as the entries form Ireland this year's shortlist of ten includes books from France, Pakistan, the UK and the USA.

The International DUBLIN Literary Award is proudly sponsored by Dublin City Council and managed by Dublin City Libraries. The award is worth €100,000 to the winner. If the book has been translated the author receives €75,000 and the translator received €25,000.

Womens National Health Association HIR Blog

Monica's BabyclubThis photograph (larger image below) from the Dublin City Library and Archive shows groups of women with their babies and young children outside St Monica’s Babies Club in St. Augustine Street, close to John’s Lane Church in the heart of Dublin’s Liberties.  This club, - one of about 170 set up throughout Ireland - opened in 1909 and aimed to educate mothers in the overall care of their infants by holding classes and appropriate lecture series on the premises.

Dora Maguire Historian In Residence Blog

Black and White portrait of DoraThis week I have had the great pleasure of visiting Massachusetts and presenting a paper at the annual national meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies held in Boston. It was my second time attending such a gathering, having also presented a paper on Dublin poet Maeve Cavanagh MacDowell two years ago, when ACIS met in Kansas City, Missouri. This time around I spoke about the life of Dora Maguire, another woman who happened to be profiled in R. M. Fox’s 1935 book of essays Rebel Irishwomen.

The Magic Table

Magic table thumbnailDo you work with people with dementia or with learning disabilities? If you do, we have an exciting new product available in two of our libraries which you will want to know about.

The Magic Table (or ‘Tovertafel’ in Dutch) is an award-winning innovation from the Netherlands, and it uses specially designed technology to help people with mid-to-late stage dementia and also adults with learning disabilities. 

Collinstown Aerodrome Raid 1919

Old Photo of Dublin AirportThe Soloheadbeg Ambush in January 1919 did not lead to a wide scale conflict immediately. For much of 1919, the Irish Volunteers embarked on a mainly defensive campaign, primarily searching for arms. As a result, some skirmishes broke out leading to some deaths.

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