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Dublin: A Year in Words

Darragh O'ReillyDublin: A Year in Words is a Dublin UNESCO City of Literature project which showcased the breadth and diversity of our city’s living poets through a year-long series of poetry videos filmed across 12 Dublin bookshops.

Like the city itself, the poets featured in the series are more than the sum of their parts. Collectively they tell of a Dublin full of light and shade, a city of contradictions, in constant flux. They show us that the story of Dublin is everybody’s to tell. It has no fixed points. Beyond wild, it exists far more in the unspoken and the unseen than any attempt to distil it down to a neat package can do justice to. And yet it is our poets perhaps more than anyone who have grappled with the task of laying our lifelines bare and bringing voice to the city. Dublin A Year in Words presents a cross-section of 12 poets who do just that, filmed in establishments that keep the city’s essence alive.

Here's a playlist featuring all 12 poems from the series:

Making Millions by Erika McGann is 2018 Citywide Reading Choice

Making MillionsWe are delighted to announce Making Millions by Erika McGann as the 2018 Citywide Reading for Children. This exciting adventure story about the Bubble Street Gang is suitable for boys and girls aged 7-9 years.

“I’m so excited and delighted that Making Millions is the 2018 Citywide Read. I live in the heart of the city and I’ve already met and shared stories with a lot of kids through Dublin City Libraries. I’m looking forward to meeting many more and to hearing their stories about secret forts, jumble sales, ghost stories and getting up to (just a little bit of) mischief.” Says Erika.

The campaign is run by Dublin UNESCO City of Literature and Dublin City Council Public Libraries, in partnership with Puffin Books, and runs from January to March 2017.

Living in Victorian Dublin

GPODublin City Hall was the venue for our third Heritage Week event, our seminar ‘Living in Victorian Dublin’. This is the second in our annual series, the first was ‘Living in Georgian Dublin’ in 2016 and the next will be ‘Living in Restoration Dublin’ in 2018.  Our five speakers each spoke on a different topic, in order to cover all aspects of the Victorian city.  Michael Barry was our first speaker.  Author of Victorian Dublin Revealed he gave an overview of the entire city, demonstrating how many buildings, both public and domestic, have remained from that era and introducing them through his own splendid photography. 

The Irish Revolution 1917-1923 - Brian Hanley

The Irish RevolutionWhat happened in Ireland after the 1916 Rising? How did the political, economic and social landscape change and what brought about independence in 1922? Listen back to a three-part lecture series delivered by Brian Hanley Dublin City Council’s Historians-in-Residence for Dublin City Library & Archive.  The lecture topics are:

  • Lecture 1- Ireland in 1917
  • Lecture 2 - What was the War of Independence?
  • Lecture 3 - What was the Civil War?

News from Nelson: my dear old Friend

Bang BangAs regular readers of my Blog will know, I have made many friends down the centuries – but probably my best friend of all was Bang Bang.  Born as Thomas Dudley, I used to follow his escapades from the top of my Pillar by placing a spyglass to my one good eye.  Such adventures as he had!  ‘Shooting’ people with an old church key – and these to be grown-up adults – well they went down like tenpins shouting and roaring with ‘pain’.  Bang Bang’s inspiration was the Westerns which he saw when he went to the flicks – he was usually admitted free of charge and if he went in the afternoon his young friends were also let in with him.  He fancied himself as a cowboy riding a horse but as he couldn’t afford a horse he went for the next best thing – the buses!   In those days (I speak of the 1950s and early 1960s) the buses in Dublin had an open platform at the back and while the bus was already moving Bang Bang launched himself triumphantly onto the platform and from this his trusty steed he resumed ‘shooting’ calling out ‘Bang Bang’!

Kevin Street Library Refurbishment

Kevin St Library[Updated: November 2017] The timetable for completion of the refurbishment works is as follows:

  • Contract commencement date: 30 January 2017
  • Commencement of works: 8 February 2017
  • Completion/handover: 8-9 months
  • Fit-out/move in: 2 months, opening Spring 2018

The Design Concept have been awarded the contract for the fit out of the library. Examples of their previous work can be seen here: thedesignconcept.co.uk/inspiration-gallery

Dublin City Public Libraries apologise for the continued inconvenience caused to the users of Kevin Sreet Library.

A Crackin' New Exhibition Explores the History of Jacob’s Biscuit Factory

Jacob's Biscuits exhibArdmhéara Bhaile Átha Cliath / Lord Mayor of Dublin Mícheál Mac Donncha will officially launch a new exhibition Jacob’s Biscuit Factory & Dublin: An Assorted History, today, Friday, 8 September at 1pm in Dublin City Library and Archive.

Drawing on the vast 330 boxes of Jacob Biscuit Factory Archives held at Dublin City Library, and using beautifully illustrated panels, oral histories, flags and original artefacts, the exhibition tells both a chronological and thematic history of Jacob’s Biscuit Factory. The events of 1913-1922 which impacted on Ireland nationally feature prominently and using the lens of the factory allows the exhibition to provide a unique contribution to the Decade of Commemorations. 

Baby, Wobbler & Toddler Book Club - We’re Back!!!

Babies love booksWe’re back with new toys, new books, new members and a new book club dedicated to wobblers.  Having taken a break over the summer, Ballymun Library is delighted to host weekly book clubs for younger children again.  Attendance is free and no prior booking is required.  At each session, Maria (Library Staff Facilitator) reads a story and provides tips on reading to younger children.  A song or rhyme based on the theme of the story is covered.  Then toys are brought out so that the children have an opportunity to play and the grown ups have a chance to chat. 

Manuscript of the Month: Reformation 02

Francis TaylorAlderman Francis Taylor was a successful and well-respected member of the municipal government, the Dublin City Assembly.  He was born in Swords, Co. Dublin around 1550, at a time of religious controversy.  The Taylors remained loyal to Rome and did not subscribe to the 1536 Act of Supremacy which declared that Henry VIII and not the Pope was the supreme head of the Church.

Francis Taylor became a merchant and settled in Dublin City, where he had a house in Ram Lane.  He married Gennet Shelton, the daughter of a Dublin merchant, and the couple had five sons and a daughter.  Taylor entered municipal politics, was elected Sheriff of Dublin for the civic year 1586-7 and three years later he was elected Alderman on the City Assembly, a post which he held until his death in 1621.  Taylor was highly regarded for his honesty and financial ability and served as Dublin City Treasurer on seven occasions between 1593 and 1616.  The pinnacle of Taylor’s civic career came in 1595 when he was elected Mayor of Dublin.    As a senior member of the City Assembly, Taylor was asked to travel to London in April 1597, to present a petition on behalf of Dublin Corporation at the court of Elizabeth I.

Writer in Residence Position Available!

PenDublin City Council invites applications for a Writer in Residence, as part of its Culture and Creativity Plan under the Creative Ireland programme.  The residency runs for the period October 2017 to September 2018 and will be managed by the City's Library Service through the Director of Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, and will be supported in kind by Irish Writers Centre.

The residency is open to published writers working in any genre of fiction for adults and attracts a fee of €10,000 per annum.

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