Manuscript of the Month: Grafton Street (WSC/Maps/564)

WSC Map 564 detailThis map is what we would now call the development plan for what became Grafton Street. The plan is by the Dublin City Surveyor, John Greene, to the scale of 10 feet to an inch and it is dated 17 January 1680. At that date, Grafton Street was a humble country lane, linking the two open spaces of St Stephen’s Green and Hoggen Green.  There was even a municipal dung-heap, known as ‘The Pound’ at the end of the lane.  The Dublin City Assembly’s plan envisaged a new street to be 46 feet wide, with removal of The Pound. As yet the new thoroughfare had not got a name – it would eventually be called after the Duke of Grafton, an illegitimate grandson of Charles II.

News from Nelson: Dublin First and Always

Thomas KirkThe year was 1809 and I stood patiently - enclosed in a block of Portland Stone, waiting to be released by the noted Cork sculptor, Thomas Kirk.  At last my mouth was completed and I opened it and spoke to him: ‘How do, Tom Kirk!’ and he replied ‘Tolerably well, Nelson – my work on you is almost done.’  But I was curious about something, and asked: ‘I presume that as I am the first monument to myself, I am destined for London?’  I was dismayed when he said: ‘No, I am under commission to Dublin.’   Dublin!  I had never been there and though I knew of its fame as ‘The Second City of the Empire’ I also knew that it had lost its Irish Parliament with the Act of Union and that poverty was looming.  And then I thought about it: in spite of its economic difficulties, Dublin had cherished me enough to be the first to raise a Pillar to my goodself.   I would be glad to go there.

Get creative in your library this Autumn!

pencilsBring a little colour and creativity into your life this autumn! We have lots of opportunities for you to get creative at your local library. Why not join one of our friendly groups and try your hand at creative writing, art, knitting, crochet or quilting.  If music is more your thing come along to a drumming workshop at our Central Library. Regular open poetry evenings at Inchicore and Pearse Street Library give voice to poets - new and experienced.

Our popular Children's Art in Libraries programme also returns this Autumn with visual arts, storytelling and music workshops.

Keep an eye on library events and Dublin City of Literature for ideas, inspiration and opportunities.

Knowing Dublin – Know Your City Council

Knowing DublinOn Tuesday, 3rd October, 2017 in the Mansion House, Dawson Street, an tArdmhéara Míchéal Mac Donncha, launched a new Guide ‘Knowing Dublin – Know Your City Council’; an introduction to the work of Dublin City Council and the role of our elected representatives in the life of the city. Download a copy of Knowing Dublin - available in English and Irish.

Knowing Dublin – Know Your City Council is a simple introduction to the work of Dublin City Council and the role of the elected representatives in the life of the city. It is a nuts and bolts piece, told in plain language, designed to inform those with little or no knowledge of the many services that the Council provides. As such, it is relevant for young adults, new citizens, immigrants, and anyone who wants to know more about how Dublin City functions.  It is also a useful tool for teachers as a basis for class lessons.

Digital Magazine of the Month :Good Housekeeping

Good HousekeepingGood Housekeeping Magazine gives you the best recipes, health advice, beauty and fashion expertise, great ideas for your home and real life inspirational stories. In this month's issue Dame Judi Dench talks about celebrating 60 years in show business, finding love again, and stepping back into the shoes of Queen Victoria.

Download Free eMagazines with RBdigital and your Dublin City Public Libraries membership!

Irish author on Goldsmiths Prize 2017 shortlist

Sara BaumeCongratulations to Sara Baume whose second book 'a line made by walking' has been shortlisted for the Goldsmiths Prize 2017. 'A line made by walking' charts a young artist's search for meaning and healing in rural Ireland. Struggling to cope with urban life and life in general, Frankie retreats to her family's rural house on "turbine hill," vacant since her grandmother's death three years earlier.

Listen back to Sara reading from and discussing 'a line made by walking' at our recent Contemporary Irish Authors series at the Central Library.

The Irish Revolution 1917-1923 - Maeve Casserly

The Irish RevolutionWhat happened in Ireland after the 1916 Rising? How did the political, economic and social landscape change and what brought about independence in 1922? Listen back to a three-part lecture series delivered by Maeve Casserly Dublin City Council’s Historians-in-Residence for the South East Area.  The lecture topics are:

  • Lecture 1 - Ireland in 1917
  • Lecture 2 - What was the War of Independence?
  • Lecture 3 - What was the Civil War?

Listen back to Dublin Festival of History 2016

Dublin Festival of HistoryHighlights from the Dublin Festival of History 2016 recorded live at Printworks Venue, Dublin Castle and at Dublin City Public Libraries featuring talks by Saul David, Roger Moorhouse, Alex Von Tunzelmann and many more Irish and International historians. The centenary of the 1916 Rising was marked with talks looking at key figures of the Rising and a panel discussion on how 1916 was commemorated. Other topics covered include Stalin's personal library, the Suez crisis, the First World War and the campaign for truth behind Hillsborough.

Dublin Festival of History is brought to you by Dublin City Council and is managed by Dublin City Public Libraries.

Don't forget Dublin Festival of History 2017 with over 90 free events in Dublin Castle, libraries and other venues begins this Friday, 29 September.

Anthony Horowitz in Conversation with Sinéad Crowley

Anthony HorowitzListen back to bestselling author Anthony Horowitz in conversation with author and RTÉ correspondent Sinéad Crowley, recorded in Dublin City Library & Archive, Pearse St on Thursday 14 September 2017 at 7pm. Hear the wonderfully entertaining Anthony Horowitz​ read from his latest novel 'The Word is Murder' and talk to Sinéad Crowley about what he reads, how he writes and the way he's seeking to change the classic template for murder mysteries.

We love this quote where Anthony remembers when he first discovered libraries and reading as a young boy at boarding school:
"I found a library and I began to read books. And books became to me much more than just a read, they became a lifeline, they became an escape"
 Anthony read from, and talked about his latest novel The Word is Murder, which is the first of a brilliant new detective series set in London featuring Detective Michael Hawthorne.

The Long Gaze Back chosen as Dublin: One City, One Book 2018

The Long Gaze BackDublin City Council’s Public Library Service is delighted to announce that The Long Gaze Back, An Anthology of Irish Women Writers edited by Sinéad Gleeson, is the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2018. Published by New Island, the anthology spans four centuries and features some of Ireland’s most gifted writers.

Sinéad Gleeson said: "I'm thrilled and delighted on behalf of the 30 writers, past and present, that The Long Gaze Back is this year's Dublin: One City One Book choice. Anthologies are a platform for telling multiple stories and so many of the writers and their work included here are intrinsically connected to Dublin and its people. The book arose from a desire to amplify the voices of women who write, and being chosen for Dublin: One City One Book will help to introduce these talented writers to all kinds of new readers."