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New opportunity for Musician in Residence

GuitarDublin City Public Libraries invites applications for Musician(s) in Residence from individuals or groups.  The residency is envisaged as part-time, to engage with different age groups to compose, produce and perform music at the Central Library’s Music Service, other Dublin City Public Libraries and in other Dublin City Council venues as required. The groups will be identified and selected by Dublin City Public Libraries.

Applicants should submit an expression of interest to include the following:

Witnesses to War

Suite FrancaiseAs 2018 marks the centenary of the end of the First World War, Rathmines Library will host a book display called Witnesses to War throughout the month of March. This will include both fiction and non fiction works. These titles include personal accounts that document the callousness, cruelty and tragedy of war while others demonstrate how the experience of war continues to inform a writer’s work long after a war has ended.

Two of our chosen authors, Irene Nemirovsky and Anne Frank did not survive the wars they witnessed. Their accounts demand our attention and demonstrate the enduring power of the human imagination and spirit over the bleak realities, and sense of hopelessness that accompanies war.

The Redmond-O'Brien Press Gang

RedmondJohn Redmond (1 September 1856 - 6 March 1918) was elected as MP in 1881 and became leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) in 1900. Redmond’s public support for the First World War meant the IPP became associated with the high Irish death toll, as depicted above. By 1918 both the party and Redmond himself were in terminal decline. He died of a heart attack on 6 March 1918 and the IPP was decimated in the election the following December.

Dublin: One City One Book 2018

The Long Gaze BackArdmhéara Bhaile Átha Cliath Mícheál Mac Donncha, launches the 2018 Dublin: One City One Book programme of events today on the eve of International Women’s Day.

The Long Gaze BackAn Anthology of Irish Women Writers edited by Sinéad Gleeson, joins a long list of illustrious titles as this year’s featured book in the Dublin: One City One Book Festival. As suggested by the title, this book is rooted in the present with emerging writers, while looking back to the flag bearers of Irish women’s writing.

The month-long festival will feature dramatised readings, music, song and poetry, discussions with the featured authors, walking tours, talks on topics such as the tradition of women’s short fiction in Ireland, gender balance and anthologies, writing workshops, exhibitions and much more.  Many of the events are free. Check out Dublin: One City, One Book events on in our libraries.

Henry Campbell (Town Clerk of Dublin, 1893-1920)

Henry CampbellHenry Campbell was Private Secretary to Charles Stewart Parnell, leader of the Home Rule Party and supported him during ‘The Split’ arising from the controversy over the divorce of Mrs Kitty O’Shea. A native of Kilcoo, Co. Down, where he was born in 1856, Campbell was Home Rule MP for South Fermanagh in 1885 and 1886-92.  But when Parnell died suddenly in 1891, Campbell unexpectedly found himself without a job. He therefore applied for the post of Town Clerk of Dublin, which was the most senior post in Dublin Corporation.  Defeating seven other candidates, he was appointed on 24 May 1893 and, conscious that he did not have a background in local government, he said that he would leave no stone unturned to become a ‘capable and efficient servant in as short a time as possible.’

Drimnagh Castle, Dublin

Drimnagh CastleHidden from view by the more recent school buildings that share the name, Drimnagh Castle is a Norman Castle Keep located on the now named Long Mile Road, Drimnagh, Dublin.  The Castle was once home to the great Anglo-Norman Barnewall – also called deBarnwall or deBerneval -  family all of whom were descended from Hugh de Barnewall, who came to Ireland in 1212.  The influence of this family lasted over 400 years, and by 1395, when Reginald Barnewall held lands in Ballyfermot, Terenure, parts of Finglas as well as Drimnagh.

Drimnagh Castle, 1996. Dublin City Council Photographic Collection.

Sheaves of Revolt: Maeve and Ernest Kavanagh

Sheaves of RevoltDuring the First World War, an estimated 200,000 Irish joined the British forces, a fact that did not sit well with the republican movement. Some dismissed the volunteers as mercenaries or misfits, while others took a more considered view. Maeve Kavanagh, born in South Frederick Street in 1878, was a noted republican poet and she often used her pen to take aim at men who volunteered for the British army. In her 1914 collection of poetry Sheaves of Revolt, she described the brutality and horror of war and its aftermath to dissuade Irishmen from volunteering:

So hurry up and take the ‘bob’
The Butcher cannot wait,
The German guns are talking,
At a most terrific rate.
And if you should crawl back,
Minus arm or minus leg,
You’ll get leave to roam your city
To sell matches – or to beg.

Severe Weather Notice

Snow on bicyclesPlease note, severe weather is impacting adversely on library opening hours.

All library branches will close on Wednesday 28th of February, at 3:00.  We are unable to provide a mobile library service.  Our apologies for inconvenience.

Don't forget you can access our collection of eBooks, eAudiobooks, Digital Magazines and databases this May weekend. www.dublincity.ie/library-eresources

Plus explore Dublin's history through our digital repository with its vast collection of old photos, maps and ephemera http://digital.libraries.dublincity.ie

Please check the Libraries' Twitter account - @dubcilib - for updates regarding opening hours before attempting to visit your library.

Ireland and The Russian Revolutions (Podcast)

Russian RevolutionLast October Dublin City Archives marked the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917 with a series of lunchtime talks at Dublin City Hall. The talks curated by Francis Devine examined Ireland's political and cultural reaction to the Revolution.  Here you can listen back to two talks from the series. In the first, Donal Fallon examines witness statements from the Bureau of Military History, contemporary newspapers and ephemera to ascertain what the revolution meant to the Irish Left, the Trade Union movement, Sinn Féin and asks who were the Irish Bolsheviks? Then you can listen back to Dr Brian Hanley as he considers how initial support for the Russian Revolution changed to violent opposition to Communism in Ireland.

Organised by Dublin City Library & Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street Dublin 2. Courtesy of History.com

A history book club

book club loveI love books; reading books; buying or borrowing books; thinking about what I’ll read next, and of course, talking about books . I think I’ve been part of at least one book club (if not two or three) for the last ten years. Whether its friends, colleagues, my local library or part of an independent bookshop (shout out to Bob in the Gutter Bookshop for the excellent book clubs he runs!), being in a book club has always seemed like a great way to share an experience that can be so personal and make it communal.

As a Historian-in-Residence working with Dublin City Council and through Dublin City Libraries it made perfect sense to me to bring the two together… History + Libraries = a new History book club! But would the book club format work for history books? With fiction, the standard genre for any book club, it’s all about your opinion. Did you like the book, the characters, the plot, the style of writing…etc. You don’t have to be an expert on the subject of the book to discuss it. Whereas with a history book club would people feel that had to already be familiar with the historical content of the book before giving their opinion on it? There is such a huge interest in history in Dublin; in local, Irish and international history, I thought I’d take a chance. So began two new History book clubs in Terenure and Pembroke Libraries. So far they’ve been going great!

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