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Libraries Ireland: Access over 15 million items!

Libraries IrelandAnyone with a Dublin City library card can now use all 333 public libraries across the country, to read, browse, study, borrow items such as books, DVDs, games or other formats, use Wi-Fi, PCs and printing services.

Dublin City, in co-operation with all the public library services in Ireland,  is part of Libraries Ireland, launched in Navan Library on 29 May 2017. Speaking at the launch, Mr Damien English, T.D. Minister for Housing and Urban Renewal said “the introduction of the service by public libraries across the country is an exciting and ground-breaking initiative, the first of its kind in the world.  Every library in Ireland is effectively now your local library”.

Fairies and elves reading experience at Raheny Library

Raheny fairy gardenThis May, children from Raheny and Edenmore schools had fun discovering the magic of reading - with a little help from some fairies and elves! Over 200 children visited Raheny Library where they enjoyed a storytelling session with Lisa Yeates, arts and crafts and a tour of Raheny Library's fairy and elf garden.   Raheny Library's new garden seems to have proved an attractive holiday destination for fairies and elves! It looks like the fairies have been relaxing, pottering in the garden, playing on the swings and slide, playing football and of course catching up on their reading!

Learn any language, any time with uTALK

uTALKDublin Public Libraries welcomes uTalk, a new and innovative way to learn a language. This programme uses verbal, visual and fun exercises to teach language and increase your chance of success. By stimulating both sides of the brain at the same time, the visual \ memory (right brain) and the verbal (left brain). This dual process improves recall and learning dramatically. Adding a fun element helps release the neurotransmitter chemical dopamine. This keeps you motivated and improves memory recall.

News from Nelson: The Greatest?

NelsonOne of the best parts of having ‘retired into the Corpo’ is that I have plenty of time to sit and think of how wonderful I am – it passes the day for me.   Did you know that I am the greatest naval commander who ever lived?  Did I mention this before? Taking part in the Napoleonic Wars, I was victorious in the battles of Cape St. Vincent, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, The Nile, Copenhagen and of course Trafalgar.  Most of these battles were referenced on my Pillar and their names are now on display in the Craft Courtyard in Kilkenny City – the clean lettering is an inspiration to the practitioners there.

Short Stories with Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell

Danielle McLaughlinListen back to authors Danielle McLaughlin and Roisín O'Donnell reading from their collections and discussing their creative writing process. Recorded in the Central Library on 7 April 2017 as part of their Contemporary Irish Literature Series which took place during March and April 2017.

Danielle’s debut collection of short stories Dinosaurs On Other Planets, was published in Ireland in 2015 by The Stinging Fly Press and in the UK, US & Canada by John Murray and Random House in 2016. She has won various awards for her short fiction, including the William Trevor/Elizabeth Bowen International Short Story Competition, The Merriman Short Story Competition in memory of Maeve Binchy, and the Dromineer Literary Festival Short Story Competition.

Letters Patent for the Theatre Royal Dublin, 1957

Theatre RoyalManuscript of the Month, June 2017. 
Dublin’s famous Theatre Royal went through three incarnations before finally succumbing to the developers’ wrecking ball.  The first version was founded in 1820 as the Albany Theatre – based in Hawkins Street, it boasted a 2,000 seater auditorium.  During his visit to Dublin in 1821, King George IV visited the Albany and subsequently issued it with letters patent, conferring the title of Theatre Royal.  This first Theatre Royal was burned to the ground on 9 February 1880 and was replaced on the same site by the second Theatre Royal in 1897.  This was designed by Frank Matcham and seated 2,011 people. But these numbers was not enough for all the people who wanted to enjoy an evening at ‘The Royal’ so in 1935 it was replaced by a behemoth, with room for 3,700 seated and 300 standing.   This third ‘Royal’ survived until 1962 when it was demolished and replaced with an office block, Hawkins House.

Stories for Young Children

Baby with bookHere is a small selection of stories available for young children to borrow at your local Library.  If you don’t see what you’re looking for, please ask a staff member.  Check this page for regular updates.

Colours

Tales from Acorn Wood: Colours (Based on the Tales from Acorn Wood books by Julia Donaldson & Axel Scheffler)
My First Mr Men Colours

Alphabet

ABC by Kim Sebold

Total War in Flanders - the Irish Connection

Edward BrierleyThe Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association Archive held at Dublin City Library and Archive holds the personal papers of a number of Irish men who fought at the Belgium Front in 1917.

Dubliner, Edward Brierley fought at the Battle of Messines during his remarkable army career which included winning three Certificates for bravery. He survived the war and on returning to Ireland he went on to have a second notable career, signing for Shelbourne Association Football Club (AFC) in 1922 and playing in the FAI Cup Final on St. Patrick’s Day 1923. He also played for the Ballsbridge team St. Mary’s United (AFC).

Photo: Edward Brierley seated, in uniform (Ref. RDFA/09/27)

100 Years since start of Battle of Wijtschate /Messines Ridge

Messines Peace ParkThe Battle of Messines (7–14 June 1917) was an offensive conducted by the British Second Army, under the command of General Sir Herbert Plumer, on the Western Front near the village of Messines in West Flanders, Belgium, during the First World War. Today on the centenary of the beginning of the battle, an island of Ireland commemoration, jointly led by the Governments of Ireland and the UK, in partnership with the Mayor of Messines, will take place at 14.00 at the island of Ireland Peace Park in Belgium.

Image: Turning of the first sod on the site of the Island of Ireland Peace Park, performed by representatives of the British and Irish armies. Private Dickenson and Trooper Paul Kellett. (Ref. RDFA.068 pg.14)

'Some good angel'

Strike in Lewes JailHarry Boland, a tailor, originally from Phibsborough, but living in Clontarf was 30 years of age in 1917. He had been prominent in the GAA as a member of the Dublin hurling team and county chairman and was a member of the IRB and the Irish Volunteers. During Easter Week he fought in the GPO and was sentenced to ten years in prison for his role in the Rising. Boland spent the early part of his sentence in Dartmoor alongside Eamon de Valera, Thomas Ashe and Eoin MacNeill. In the spring of 1917 the prisoners were moved to Lewes jail in Sussex. There the authorities tried to clamp down on the increasingly confident republicans who refused to do prison work or obey instructions unless they were treated as soldiers. After several confrontations on 5 June the prisoners were dispersed to other locations. Boland was among those sent to Maidstone.

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